A fine set of fetlocks!

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Where: Unknown

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When: 01 January 1917

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Captain W.J. Baird, Aide de Camp to the Lord Lieutenant sits astride a really fine looking horse in this carefully posed image from the Poole Collection. Now we know the name of the soldier so now we want to know is the name of the horse???

+++ UPDATE +++
Thanks everyone, for confirmation that Captain James Baird was aide-de-camp to Lord Wimborne, Lord Lieutentant in Ireland, and that he was in that post in 1917 (newspaper reports). O Mac suggests Busoni as the horse's name, but we'd need some hard evidence. We're a tough crowd. Oh, and we always love to see John Spooner waxing lyrical about movable boudoirs!

Photographer: A. H. Poole

Collection: Poole Photographic Collection, Waterford

Date: 1915 - 1917, most likely 1917

NLI Ref: POOLEWP 2734

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 9742
ahpoole arthurhenripoole glassnegative nationallibraryofireland captainwjbaird aidedecamp adc lordlieutenant viceregallodge phoenixpark dublin horse uniform wjbaird ireland 1917 1910s 20thcentury poolephotographiccollection

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  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 18/Nov/2020 09:23:06

    👀 Yikes! We've been indented!

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    O Mac

    • 18/Nov/2020 09:27:38

    I can see now why the carpet in Pooles studio looks so treadbare at times. This photo also tells us that his studio was on the ground floor. Busoni might have been the name of the horse?

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    cargeofg

    • 18/Nov/2020 09:31:11

    No Carpet Required with apologies to Phil Collins

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    sharon.corbet

    • 18/Nov/2020 09:33:05

    W. J Baird was ADC to Lord Wimbourne, the Lord Lieutenant from 1915 to 1917. This not yet digitised photo is also dated approx. 1917.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 18/Nov/2020 09:52:59

    ?? William James Baird 1893 - 1961 on The Peerage - www.thepeerage.com/p5730.htm#i57295 "William James Baird was born on 8 November 1893. He was the son of William Baird and Caroline Muriel Burn-Callander. He married Audley Josephine Helen Porter, daughter of John Porter Porter and Josephine Henrietta Lloyd, on 28 May 1918.1 He and Audley Josephine Helen Porter were divorced in 1936.1 He died on 2 February 1961 at age 67. He lived at Elie, Fife, Scotland. ... "

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/Nov/2020 10:05:19

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Indented indeed, I thought it was just me.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/Nov/2020 10:05:47

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Lots of photoshopping going on.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/Nov/2020 10:07:38

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Wow, It never crossed my mind that this might be a studio photo!

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/Nov/2020 10:08:45

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia It indents when you make a comment. Disappears when refreshed, strange.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/Nov/2020 10:12:06

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet is 1915 - 1917, most likely 201917 our updated date?

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 18/Nov/2020 10:28:29

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland As far as I can see from the newspapers, he may have only been ADC during 1917. So yes, 1915-1917, most likely 1917.

  • profile

    cargeofg

    • 18/Nov/2020 11:21:32

    Very appropriate to have an equine theme today in light of the news this morning that there are a pair of Connemara ponies from Kylemore Abbey going up to the Aras.

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 18/Nov/2020 11:56:14

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] In 1895 (so a long time before this photograph and probably irrelevant), Poole enigmatically advertised his studio as being on the "Drawing Room floor,"

    We beg to intimate that our Studios are on the Drawing Room floor, and have the advantage of the best light, softened by the use of ground glass, which is of the utmost importance for first class Photography
    (Waterford Standard - Wednesday 04 September 1895) Whereas the Waterford Portrait Co in Rose Lane didn't mince its words:
    The studio being on the ground floor, Children in Perambulators, Bicyclists, Dogs, &c can be Photographed with the greatest ease.
    No mention of horses though And of course, further afield, I don't need to remind anyone about the arrangements of Chancellor& Son of 57 Lower Sackville Street * (photographers to HRH the prince of Wales, portraits in platinotype a speciality)
    A MOVABLE BOUDOIR conveys SITTERS to the Galleries, thus obviating the trouble of ascending the stairs.
    (Irish Times - Tuesday 09 June 1891) * just round the corner from the Gunpowder Office

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 18/Nov/2020 12:14:19

    Busoni seems to have been a favourite name for a horse over the years. Was there a famous horse of that name in the past

  • profile

    cargeofg

    • 18/Nov/2020 12:16:48

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner A Movable Boudoir ??

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 18/Nov/2020 12:30:00

    A few stairs didn't stop Buck Whaley's horse.

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 18/Nov/2020 13:31:17

    Where did Busoni go? Maybe I'm wrong but it looks like a studio photo. There's some scratching where cloth touches ground.

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 18/Nov/2020 13:36:46

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Previously discussed in the picture entitled "Gunpowder Office" Gun Powder Office This is what I wrote 8 years ago: "I used to work in a building which had a movable boudoir, but we called it the 'lift'. The OED has citations for 'lift' in the sense of "An apparatus for raising or lowering persons or things from one floor or level to another" from 1851, so 'movable boudoir' sounds like a bit of creative excess by an advertising copywriter. Nevertheless, it's the phrase I am going to use from now on. And I can't help thinking that Library Towers must have its fair share of movable boudoirs."

  • profile

    cargeofg

    • 18/Nov/2020 13:49:38

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Indeed, I sort of suspected it was a lift. I knew the Gunpowder Office as Knapp and Petersen Tobacconists early 70s to 80s

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/Nov/2020 14:07:12

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner I wonder did they take Horses in the Movable BOUDOIR?

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/Nov/2020 14:09:21

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner 8 years, have we been at this for 8 years, we are getting OLD.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 18/Nov/2020 14:14:10

    "William's son, William Baird (1848-1918) and grandson William James Baird (1893-1961) were both addicted to foxhunting, and moved to Rutland, where they both served as masters of the Cottesmore hunt. "

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/Nov/2020 14:23:00

    With all the kerfuffle recently about The Queens Gambit I came across The Queen of Chess Edith Baird, who was married to a W. J. Baird, I do not think she is connected to our W.J.?

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 18/Nov/2020 14:54:30

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland My first comment (and newspaper cutting) was nine years ago. Under an O'Dea of Harcourt St station,

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 18/Nov/2020 19:34:08

    next day Phew! We've been un-indented. And un-Busonified. And the horse still has no name . . .

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 18/Nov/2020 23:36:29

    Somebody wrote a song about him m.youtube.com/watch?v=na47wMFfQCo I wonder if it was his polo pony, after all, he did live in the Park. Odd that none of the family histories make any mention of his army service, have we got the right one?

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 19/Nov/2020 08:45:22

    Can anyone spot the Martingale?

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    CASSIDY PHOTOGRAPHY

    • 19/Nov/2020 09:50:18

    Great photo.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 19/Nov/2020 09:51:34

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] No? Mary Of course I did! Mary. The two most common types of martingale, the standing and the running, are used to control the horse's head height, and to prevent the horse from throwing its head so high that the rider gets hit in the face by the horse's poll or upper neck.

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    O Mac

    • 19/Nov/2020 10:19:48

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Impressed...you certainly know your martingales :) which is it above? standing or running?

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 19/Nov/2020 10:32:36

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I think running!

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 19/Nov/2020 10:41:20

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ yep... it is running.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 19/Nov/2020 10:49:31

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Top of the class ;-)

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 19/Nov/2020 10:54:01

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Hay!!! hold your horses..

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 20/Nov/2020 05:17:07

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Owen i'm running late again, I better hoof it, I need to stirrup some interest in a new photo.

  • profile

    bobgbennett

    • 23/Nov/2020 10:09:23

    Can anyone confirm his regiment, I’m not sure due to the oblique angle of viewing his cap badge, but it might be Royal Dublin Fusiliers, or Royal Artillery from its rough shape. The breeches he wears with turned up cuffs and ankle boots were not regulation with uniform and look decidedly odd.

  • profile
  • profile

    CASSIDY PHOTOGRAPHY

    • 24/Nov/2020 03:43:10

    www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Horse = Cavalry = Light Horse Regiment. Looks to me like an on the spot staged corporate-type photo. The "set" is a painted wall. He should be wearing riding boots, but this seems more a photo taken for posterity. Trousers might not even be his own, were too long and turned up or it might be his style. Notice his gloves are turned down. In fact, I wonder if the horse is a prop. Not one whisker out of place and the lines of the horse are too sharp. Or, maybe even this Captain W.J. Baird might have been photographed separately and put on the horse in the darkroom. While it seems a nice photo, something does not add up.

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 24/Nov/2020 10:09:40

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] The W.J. Baird in [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia]'s peerage link was in the 12th Royal Lancers, from 1914. However, I'm a bit confused as he's still described as a Lt. in the Lancers in newspaper articles in 1918 on the occasion of his wedding. On the other hand, his wife Audley Porter-Porter of Belle Isle was previously one of Lady Wimborne's Ladies-in-Waiting.

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 24/Nov/2020 10:38:22

    The other photo of him has a different view of the badge, and it does look to me like it could be the 12th Royal Lancers badge.

  • profile

    bobgbennett

    • 24/Nov/2020 15:56:36

    Thank you Sharon, I looked at the other photo and, as with you, the badge certainly seems to me to be that of the 12th (Prince of Wales’s Own) Lancers. His ankle length riding breeches are a specific type originally known as Jodhpurs that came from India (it’s a term now used for almost all riding breeches, but originally meant just the ankle length type). They became highly fashionable among the equestrian set, and help to confirm the period for the photo. A particular, handsome, superstar polo player from India, who underwent a tour of Britain was largely responsible for their popularity. NB. The horse is equipped with civilian rather than military saddle and tack and his dress, absent Sam Browne belt and military netherwear, is a form of equestrian ‘mufti’ that, had he not been an officer, would have left him open to a charge (breach of discipline) of ‘mixed dress’.