Beetles, points and Foynes.

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Where: Munster, Limerick, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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For some reason O'Dea has made the trip down to Foynes in Co. Limerick to view a "Beetle" moving an empty wagon which can only mean that a new piece of kit is being trialed? Foynes was always a small town well down the Shannon Estuary from Limerick City and the ships passed it by to get to the port in the city. This has all changed now and today Foynes is a fine deep water port taking ships that could never have navigated the winding estuary!

Photographer: James P. O'Dea

Collection:James P. O'Dea

Date: iNovember 5, 1968

NLI Ref.: ODEA 62/1

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie


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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 15429
jamespo’dea o’deaphotographiccollection nationallibraryofireland foynes colimerick munster shannonestuary deepwaterport limerickcity portoflimerick beetle points rails wagon kit 1968

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  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 06/Oct/2020 08:07:09

    5 November 1968 was a Tuesday . . . Can we blame Guy Fawkes?!

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 06/Oct/2020 08:08:54

    Might be some bit of marshalling kit, what with the looped chain in the middle and the row of wheel ratchets on the rail.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 06/Oct/2020 08:15:28

    It doesn't line up with the map very well. Maybe if it was flipped, though it's still not great even then. There may be some map between the Cassini and the modern that we need.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 06/Oct/2020 08:23:32

    Railbrakes at Moyne plant, Foynes, Co. Limerick catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000307570

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 06/Oct/2020 08:47:56

    An Irish version of the "hump"?

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 06/Oct/2020 10:02:50

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] That's what I'm guessing. There's not much room behind it, though.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 06/Oct/2020 10:07:10

    I can't see where it would be in Foynes. It's on the seaward side of the wall, but with silos or tanks on the landward side, and with a hill full of trees behind the cameraman. Here bit.ly/33wUQng is a possibility, but where are the silos?

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    derangedlemur

    • 06/Oct/2020 11:31:59

    If it is there, it's not much like it now: goo.gl/maps/3NRrKviEQeYfUX398 Edit: I reckon it is here, but the tanks on the far side of the road have been replaced with different ones since then.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 06/Oct/2020 11:38:55

    "In many places rail systems are being replaced by trackless vehicles, conveyor belts or pipelines. Rakes of wagons in a Lorraine (France) iron ore mine are moved by powered rubber tyred wheels strategically located at the side of the track which drive on the sides of the wagons. This type of system can be remotely controlled and operate where conveyor or cable haulage is impracticable. Cable systems have been used for many years on industrial railways, but usually not for train-marshalling except at mainline goods depots where capstans have been employed. Several modern systems have been introduced, mostly with a winch-worked trolley or "beetle" running on narrow gauge rails inside the standard gauge track. The "beetle" is able to accurately position the wagons – an important requirement at container depots and oil terminals." www.irsociety.co.uk/Archives/37/Letters_37.htm

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 06/Oct/2020 13:09:51

    Here it is looking the other way in colour: www.geograph.ie/photo/2862798

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    metrovick

    • 06/Oct/2020 16:56:58

    Looks like a zinc ore wagon which was a flow that operated from Silvermines and exported through Foynes. No rail freight in Foynes now but hopefully we will see it return in the future.

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    suckindeesel

    • 06/Oct/2020 19:05:31

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Here's some nice aerial shots from a decade earlier, showing the Esso tanks, some distance up from the actual station. The tanks are now mostly all gone, there is a large modern concentration nearer the coastline. catalogue.nli.ie/Collection/vtls000033928/CollectionList?...

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    derangedlemur

    • 07/Oct/2020 07:07:34

    It doesn't look as though they got much use out of this installation; it hasn't been built yet in https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]'s 1955 shots of the Esso terminal, and it's gone now.

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    Flickr

    • 08/Oct/2020 04:37:54

    Congrats on Explore! ⭐ October 7, 2020

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    gato-gato-gato

    • 08/Oct/2020 06:04:39

    Klasse!

  • profile

    le cabri

    • 08/Oct/2020 14:00:52

    Great catch

  • profile

    Wesley214

    • 08/Oct/2020 19:20:40

    Excellent capture!!!!

  • profile

    jamica1

    • 14/Nov/2020 15:01:08

    Nice item

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 15/Nov/2020 10:51:20

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/jamica1 Thank you for your nice comments