Traffic Jam at Kilmacow

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Where: Unknown

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When: 18 May 1924

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From the reluctant Khan in far off Persia, to the cans of milk at Kilmacow Creamery for today's image from the Poole Collection. A lovely scene that many who grew up in rural areas will have been familiar with in the early mornings. This scene had not changed much by the mid to late 1960s.

Photographer: A. H. Poole

Collection: Poole Photographic Collection, Waterford

Date: ca. Sunday, 18 May 1924

NLI Ref: POOLEWP 3169

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 10594
ahpoole arthurhenripoole glassnegative nationallibraryofireland kilmacow cowaterford creamery donkeys carts boys wall peccavi may 1924 1920s sunday poolephotographiccollection waterford munster ireland milk churns cans dairy peopleidentified 20thcentury

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    O Mac

    • 16/Sep/2020 07:51:06

    18th May 1924 was a Sunday. Did creameries work on Sundays? I doubt it.

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    colm.walsh

    • 16/Sep/2020 07:56:14

    My Great Grandfather Richard Walsh the Manager far left of the stage

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    Foxglove

    • 16/Sep/2020 07:59:55

    kill ma cow - dangerous place if you are a member of the dairy gang: if you think that is weak what about ... Khan to Can as a link. seriously though, this is a great rural scene with so much to visually dissect

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    O Mac

    • 16/Sep/2020 08:19:43

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ They were "Cans" in some places and "churns" in udder places.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 16/Sep/2020 08:30:41

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Hi Colm, please do tell us more about your Great Grandfather. Mary

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 16/Sep/2020 08:32:20

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] https://www.flickr.com/photos/foxglove We do still have the pun "SIN BIN", just saying! Mary

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 16/Sep/2020 08:57:38

    I wonder if Mr Poole said "SAY CHEESE!".

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    Foxglove

    • 16/Sep/2020 08:59:13

    peccavi ....

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    Foxglove

    • 16/Sep/2020 09:00:05

    my favourite pun

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    colm.walsh

    • 16/Sep/2020 09:13:14

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland He was born in Ballygorey, Mooncoin in 1870, He attended the small college next to the church in Kilmacow for a while, possibly beeing lined up for the priesthood.He emigrated to Boston around 1897 and was only there a while when word came back of a job for an educated man as manager of the local creamery. He held that position from 1898 to 1945 Dick passed away in 1950.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 16/Sep/2020 09:22:35

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] 47 years at the same job, hard to match!

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    Foxglove

    • 16/Sep/2020 09:41:56

    the photo has captured a large number of the local (male) population, because of the photos age and the young age of the younger men, others could be identified via family/ friends of Colm ??

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 16/Sep/2020 10:18:53

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/foxglove I have tagged Peccavi. I was thinking that the men in this photo have a Latin common!

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    colm.walsh

    • 16/Sep/2020 10:50:46

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/foxglove We have checked this photo before and bar the dairymaid and foreman it is hard to pinpoint exactly who the rest are. I tried looking for his milk invoices for that week as It could list the same people but I had no joy finding it.

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    O Mac

    • 16/Sep/2020 10:57:55

    €200,000 will buy it today.. touch.daft.ie/for-sale/site-dangan-kilmacow-co-kilkenny/2...

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    Niall McAuley

    • 16/Sep/2020 11:21:02

    Richard Walsh, Creamery Manager in the census of 1901 and (married) in 1911

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    Niall McAuley

    • 16/Sep/2020 11:25:39

    I think this must be him marrying Elizabeth Connolly in 1906, although it lists him as a farmer. Birth record here.

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    colm.walsh

    • 16/Sep/2020 11:51:39

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Married in 1904 in St Mary's Church Kilkenny City. I think he was pals with a priest in St Kiearns college who preformed the task. Elizabeth was from Cappagh in Kilmacow and we think they met in night school learning Irish.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 16/Sep/2020 12:06:20

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Yes, that record is for Mary's in the city. Priest was a John Doody, about the same age as Richard, recorded in 1901 as a Professor of Classics at Kieran's. In 1911, he is Priest and President of College. Wikipedia says he was President from 1903-11, so at the time of the wedding.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 16/Sep/2020 12:18:26

    Here is Eliza in 1901 at home in Cappagh.

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    suckindeesel

    • 16/Sep/2020 12:36:23

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I suppose that cows don't take Sunday off, so maybe it was a 7-day operation before the days of local refrigeration.

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    O Mac

    • 16/Sep/2020 14:57:33

    suckindeesel I agree. Too many white shirts for a weekday.... and taken before mass.

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    rpgvlwqt88

    • 16/Sep/2020 15:35:27

    The Church of Ireland have just released some slides of Ireland and are looking to find the locations and individuals and any more detail. I suggested they look here but if anyone wants to review - see here - www.flickr.com/photos/churchofireland/albums/721576646014...

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    O Mac

    • 16/Sep/2020 16:07:45

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Dodgy link,?

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    suckindeesel

    • 16/Sep/2020 16:10:22

    I wonder what that weighing scales was for?

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 16/Sep/2020 16:13:13

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Thanks a million for the information, Colm. We love to identify people, and information from a relative is cat nip to us. I put a note on the photo indicating which one is your great-grandfather. Would you please mind checking that I've put a note on the right man?

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    rpgvlwqt88

    • 16/Sep/2020 16:13:35

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] www.flickr.com/photos/churchofireland/24461491454/in/albu...

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    suckindeesel

    • 16/Sep/2020 16:49:10

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Certainly a swarthy looking lot, but they were all men of the soil. They don't call it the sunny south-east for nothing.

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    colm.walsh

    • 17/Sep/2020 07:40:15

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Yes that's Dick. Dairymaid Helena Timmony (Fermanagh) to her right is Patrick Walsh (Upper Street Kilmacow)

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    Dr. Ilia

    • 17/Sep/2020 08:00:06

    superb capture

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    Niall McAuley

    • 17/Sep/2020 10:18:35

    Helena Timmoney was 6 in 1911, 19 here.

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    cargeofg

    • 17/Sep/2020 11:07:15

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Spoke with my father this mormng(17-9-20) He lived near a creamery in Co Clare and my Uncle Frank worked there (Early to mid 1940s) as a clerk and my Grandfather would have brought milk to it. Milk and cream was collected from the creamery (every day in summertime and every second day in wintertime) and brought to a bigger creamery in Ennistymon. No lorry collection on Christmas Day but milk was collected on St Stephens Day. They did not have refrigeration at Ballynacaragh Creamery hence the collection.. It is between Corrofin and Kilfenora. They could separate the milk there. The system worked that you unloaded your churns of whole milk and when emptied and recorded you could get skimmed milk back to feed pigs. People who did not want the skimmed milk could sell it to people who did. My Dad seems to think it cost 1d a gallon for the skim milk.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 17/Sep/2020 16:03:59

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Really obliged to you, Colm! Great to put even more names to faces. Helen was very far from her Fermanagh home...

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    JohnFinn

    • 18/Sep/2020 07:22:23

    "Cans" of milk? They are churns! I remember them being used up to the 1960s.

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    cargeofg

    • 18/Sep/2020 09:20:39

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnfinn I remember having to wash them !