West Bridge, Enniskillen

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Interesting that the daughter of yesterdays subject, Mr. A.E. West Esq., was notorious for skippering her motor yacht on the Erne in 1922 and today's shot shows the same river with a steam boat in all it's glory? West Bridge, Enniskillen in this fine Royal plate from the Lawrence Collection looked very good in this shot!

Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Circa 1865 - 1914

NLI Ref: L_ROY_11548

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 10319
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio glassnegative nationallibraryofireland enniskillen cofermanagh ulster northernireland westbridge lougherne erneriver steamboat paddlesteamer ladyofthelake lawrencephotographcollection

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 01/Sep/2020 07:44:44

    Have we met the Lady of the Lake before? She seems familiar . . .

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 01/Sep/2020 07:59:45

    Some 10 year old discussion here - www.iwai.ie/forum/read.php?1,25102

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 01/Sep/2020 08:09:38

    Here she is again - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000338647

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    derangedlemur

    • 01/Sep/2020 08:23:00

    Curious looking funnel - is it retractable?

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    derangedlemur

    • 01/Sep/2020 08:27:30

    www.clydeships.co.uk/view.php?ref=1288? It's a bit lost if it is.

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    derangedlemur

    • 01/Sep/2020 08:30:16

    if anyone has a login for JSTOR, we can read all about it here: www.jstor.org/stable/27695617

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    suckindeesel

    • 01/Sep/2020 08:31:07

    West Bridge rebuilt 1892, www.fermanaghlakelands.com/Trail-2-Enniskillen-Town-A402 So 1892 - ?

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    cargeofg

    • 01/Sep/2020 08:31:12

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Yes. That one looks like it is a telescopic funnel so height can be reduced to pass under bridges. Guinness barges on the Liffey were hinged. I am sure NLI has some photos of them passing under O'Connell bridge at high water with funnel lowered. Crew on board got covered in soot and smuts.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 01/Sep/2020 08:32:52

    Oh wow! Via Trove, a glowing description of a Mr Taylor's trip on the Lady of the Lake in 1899, including a novel way of delivering the mail - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/214375843?searchTerm=e...

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    sharon.corbet

    • 01/Sep/2020 08:35:58

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] According to that article, this is actually the boat that later became Hazel West Laverton's flagship.

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    derangedlemur

    • 01/Sep/2020 08:40:02

    This would seem to be the one: www.clydeships.co.uk/view.php?official_number=&imo=&a... It doesn't match the lough gill one above. I guess Lady of the lake was just a popular name.

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    derangedlemur

    • 01/Sep/2020 08:41:40

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet Continuity'R'Us!

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    sharon.corbet

    • 01/Sep/2020 08:44:16

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I don't think this is the former Devinish. The article mentions yet another Lady of the Lake, that was formerly the Rossclare, which was in operation as the Lady of the Lake from 1898 to 1914.

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    suckindeesel

    • 01/Sep/2020 09:19:23

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] The former Rossclare, renamed Lady of the Lake 1898, entered tourist traffic. From a quick scan of JSTOR. Currently possible to login via your Google a/c for online viewing only

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    sharon.corbet

    • 01/Sep/2020 09:40:46

    There is another article about public transport in Fermanagh, that gives more info. It claims that the former Rossclare went into operation as the Lady of the Lake on 1st June 1896. She sailed from Shore Road Pier at 10 am and arrived at Castlecaldwell at 12. Round trip fares cost 12 1/2p for saloon and 7 1/2p for steerage. There were also rail/steamer tickets available to Bundoran, and a season family ticket for 1 pound. It mentions as well that it was laid up at the end of the 1915 season, then bought by Hazel Laverton, who had it converted to screw propulsion, and changed it from steam to internal combustion. She renamed it Pandora, and planned to use it as a houseboat.

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    derangedlemur

    • 01/Sep/2020 09:41:12

    I wonder where it was built. It's not either of the usual suspects of Belfast or Clydeside.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 01/Sep/2020 09:42:00

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Lewis and Stockwell of London.

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    derangedlemur

    • 01/Sep/2020 10:00:24

    The Erne’s first steam boat voyage was at Christmas 1842 by William Dargan’s Countess of Erne, a paddle steamer,, 32 tons, 20 HP, from the newly opened Ulster Canal lock to Enniskillen, calling at Lord Erne’s new quay for Lisnaskea. Later Lord Erne flew his Commodore’s flag on his own paddle steamer, Elgington, LEYC’s first powered craft, built 1859 in Scotland. Some other LEYC steam launches were Firefly at Crom, Edward Sauderson’s Filibuster, he being an MP, band the work boat Wide-Awake, seen at the starts of early Fairy races/b, and abandoned today in Enniskillen. Most famous was the Rossclare, later Lady of the Lake and Pandora, built 1868 and scrapped 1957, so the new Portora Lock need not be big enough to take her. Her funnel, wheel and deck rail stanchions all folded flat to get under the West Bridge in floods. Her stanchions survive, a rope strung through them, fencing off today’s LEYC lawn. Edward Archdale’s steam launch was kept afloat in a fine boathouse, still there beside today’s big slip way in Castle Archdale caravan site. He was a keen Victorian engineer who once served on Brunel’s mighty Great Eastern. The Erne’s most recent steamer voyages were only in 1996, when ten home built boats in a Steam Boat Association of Great Britain rally took part in the LEYC Summer Regatta– a fine sight, hissing steam and gleaming varnish. Early motor cars and boats were at the first Fairy regattas. Lough Erne Motor Boat Club emerged, running speed and reliability trials and cruises. It wound up and passed some assets to LEYC. AGM 1964 then changed rules to add a motor boat Fleet Captain and this fleet grew strong. Forty years later, a valuable LEYC feature is a larger proportion of power craft than have most yacht clubs. Most are for cruising and moor at LEYC Marina or elsewhere about the lake.

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    derangedlemur

    • 01/Sep/2020 10:12:00

    Lough Erne Paddle Steamer PS Rossclare was built by Lewis & Stockwell of London for service with a hotelier at Ballinamallard in County Fermanagh, Ireland in 1866-68. After a relatively short period in operation and entered a prolonged period of idleness that lasted to 1896. In that year she was thoroughly refurbished by Belfast shipbuilders Workman Clark. She took up service between Enniskillen and Castlecalwell on Lough Erne. Also at that time she was renamed Lady of the Lake. The picture shows her on a sailing after having passed under the West Bridge at Enniskillen around 1905. She continued in that service until the start of WW1 when she was laid up again. After the war she was purchased by a lady who converted her to a houseboat and screw-propelled motor yacht, renaming her Pandora. During the Irish 'Disturbances' in 1921-23 she was used by the government to enforce law and order on lower Lough Erne. She took part in the Siege of Pettigo and the Battle of Belleek. At this time she was painted battleship grey and referred to as the "Ulster Navy"! She appeared to retire into static use after that until finally scrapped in October 1956 in her 91st year.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 01/Sep/2020 10:46:54

    " ... Lady of the Lake ... plies between Enniskillen and Castle Caldwell in connection with circular tours from Bundoran, etc., from June 1st until September 14 (week days only). ... " From that 1908 book about Picturesque Donegal; there is a map a few pages earlier - archive.org/stream/picturesquedoneg00shru/picturesquedone...

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    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Sep/2020 11:14:03

    In Streetview, the bridge is the only structure still standing. [https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet] EDIT: No, I am facing the wrong way! Streetview doesn't have this angle, but in this view many of the buildings are visible.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 01/Sep/2020 11:18:49

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley I thought we were on the other side of the bridge, and the collection of houses on the right are all still there.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Sep/2020 11:45:50

    Bridge is visible at extreme right here: Enniskillen, Co. Fermanagh, late 19th century

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    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Sep/2020 11:51:12

    Aerialview in the archive from 1955.

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    suckindeesel

    • 01/Sep/2020 20:16:05

    According to that JSTOR article, The Navigation of Lough Erne in the 18th, 19th & 20th centuries by Mary Rogers www.jstor.org/stable/27695617?read-now=1&refreqid=exc... The steamer started life in 1886 as the 59 ton Rossclare. It was provided by a Major d'Darcy Irvine for the hotel of the same name. Subsequently purchased by a Capt. Archdale as a private yacht. Sold to the Lough Erne Boat Co. in 1898 for £50 who renovated her, renamed her The Lady of the Lake and built a dry dock at Pontora Point. They operated summer tourist runs between Enniskillen and Castle Caldwell. A family season ticket for 3 cost 15/- One could return by rail or go on to Bundoran. Laid up in 1914 until after the war when she was sold again, converted to screw propeller and renamed Pandora. Scrapped in 1956. So, date 1898 - 1914

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    an poc

    • 01/Sep/2020 20:41:34

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Judging by the large cap in the man's hand I'd say it was taken closer to 1914 than 1898. But perhaps large caps came into fashion earlier than I think.

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    suckindeesel

    • 01/Sep/2020 22:31:38

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Yes, probably later in date range, the collars have an Edwardian look to them. Just outlining the limits of the possible date range

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