The old rustic bridge below the town

Download this image

More from this collection

Related by When

Related by Where

Research Help!

Where: Unknown

Try to find the spot where the photographer was standing.

When: Unknown

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
Yet another visit this week to the Fergus O'Connor collection with a beautiful image of a bridge over a river with lots of onlookers. This is described as an "unknown location" but I think that this will not last too long?

Photographer: Fergus O’Connor

Collection: Fergus O’Connor Collection

Date: Circa 1900 - 1920

NLI Ref: OCO 265

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 10673
ferguso’connor ferguso’connorcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland bridge river boat group onlookers road town r572

Add Tags
  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 21/Aug/2020 07:26:27

    I don't recognise it off the top of my head, but it has plenty of identifying features. It's beside the sea, for a start.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 21/Aug/2020 07:28:55

    And we're looking south-east(-ish) Edit: Assuming it's not mirrored.

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 21/Aug/2020 08:01:44

    I think it's a reverse-view of here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/16108717789

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 21/Aug/2020 08:04:11

    Both https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley and https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia felt the same when I now read the comments.

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 21/Aug/2020 08:06:48

    About the closest I can get to a Streetview that isn't just trees.

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 21/Aug/2020 08:12:17

    Here's a matching Lawrence photo, confirming that it's the (Brandy Hall) Bridge in Castletownbere.

  • profile

    Foxglove

    • 21/Aug/2020 08:17:33

    at first I thought it could be Glenarm, (co Antrim), totally lost as ever; lockdown has its benefits beyond public health

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 21/Aug/2020 08:24:06

    Yes, I am getting déjà vues all over again. I like how the arches are not symmetrical and different sizes. For some reason the NLI is not letting me into their site today. It is The Beginning Of The End Of Civilization As I Know It.

  • profile

    cargeofg

    • 21/Aug/2020 08:30:38

    In the Lawrence photo the hull of the ship furthest away seems to be subjected to been dismantled( Stern section removed down to keel) In the O 'Connor photo all that is left is keel and ribs. The other ship in the Lawrance photo has a S prefix to its registration number denoting it was from Sligo.

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 21/Aug/2020 08:32:12

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Anti-Australian bias? I've not had problems today (yet). Though, you are in the future, so maybe I'll only start getting problems this evening.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 21/Aug/2020 08:51:01

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet Phew! Seems to be working now. Touching wood.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 21/Aug/2020 09:06:20

    The bridge seems to have been widened since Mr O'Connor's day; newer, slightly different stonework is evident on the downstream side. Glad they copied the asymmetrical arches. In 2011 via https://www.flickr.com/photos/henrylyne/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/henrylyne/6076233099/

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 21/Aug/2020 12:02:36

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet] Did Mr. French climb a tree with his tripod for this shot? catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000332761 I think it's called the Aghakista Stream, tidal at this point. White building on left is a school, long closed. Bridge seems to have been widened on seaward side, upstream side in your streetview looks original. Ed. The school on left is the Brandy Hall boy's school, an 1830s example of the new national school system. It appears that the local landowner, Lord Bantry, didn't hold with educating the peasantry as he refused to allocate a site. However, a local landowner donated this site for the school. www.irishidentity.com/extras/saints/stories/brandy.htm Has anybody wondered where the Brandy Hall name came from? It reminds me of the Brandy Hole inlet beneath Bray Head in Co. Wicklow. That river looks like the perfect smuggler's creek for landing a few barrels of duty free spirit. The Aghakista bridge is actually a protected structure being a rare example of a 17th century pack horse bridge. These were the only means of transport due to the poor quality of the roads. The bridge is just wide enough for a horse and rider., no parapets were provided to avoid obstructing the load on the horse. In its day this was the main access to Castletownbere and the local tuck mill.

  • profile

    henrylyne

    • 21/Aug/2020 14:28:18

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ my photo is looking East at Brandy Hall bridge. I think the photo above is looking west at Brandy Hall bridge. Thanks for tagging me and sharing my photo.

  • profile

    henrylyne

    • 21/Aug/2020 14:36:17

    I grew up near Brandy Hall bridge in Castletownbere, this does look like it was taken just East of the bridge, looking west. The bridge was widened I think, maybe in the 2000s. The road and wall looks familiar, it leads up to an area called Droum. The stream going under the bridge pours into an inlet and then harbour with the main town to the north, or right from the photo perspective.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 22/Aug/2020 05:43:41

    In the reverse shot, I suggested that the woman on the right is Annie Breen with her children and a servant. In the 1911 census we have John Paul (13), James Dominick (12) and Annie Elizabeth (9). the 3 living children of 5. Perhaps the younger boy here is a cousin or friend. Or maybe that is one of the children who did not live to the census?

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 22/Aug/2020 05:52:51

    Here is the marriage record for James Breen marrying Anna McCarthy. John Paul was born in Castletown, although James was in Bandon constabling. James Dominick in 1898. Birth record of a Mary Agnes 21/1/1900. Mary Agnes appears in the 1901 census. She died in 1904 of Tubercular Enteritis. Birth record of Anne Breen on 30/7/1901 in Bandon where James was an RI man. No, my theory is wrong - here is the death of Kathleen Mary on 20/7/1904 aged 13 months, also from tubercular enteritis. I am blind: Kathleen Mary and Mary Agnes are literally one after the other on the same page in the record of deaths, they both died in July 1904.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 22/Aug/2020 06:06:12

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] Not forgetting your date range of 1904 - 1910 (church not yet built, see note) Interesting aside - 50 metres behind the camera is another older and more rustic bridge which caught Mr French / Lawrence's eye. The photos look identical except the boy on the left has moved his left leg - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000319275 catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000331774 Streetview - goo.gl/maps/Fg5hYkExCjC3QRsN6

  • profile

    cargeofg

    • 22/Aug/2020 10:35:20

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia WBC style Beehive in the background of the boys leg.

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 23/Aug/2020 14:13:36

    Rather incongruously, Florence M'Carthy Esq of Brandy Hall was listed as sending apologies for absence to a grand soirée of Teetotallers of Bearhaven, as reported in the Southern Reporter and Cork Commercial Courier on Saturday 04 February 1843. 200 attended the meeting. After numerous speeches "dancing commenced, and was kept up 'till a late hour". Is Florence male of female? 'Florence' was apparently not unknown as a boy's name in the 19th century www.babycenter.com/baby-names-florence-628395.htm

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 23/Aug/2020 14:24:12

    A letter to the Cork Examiner on Tuesday 11 February 1862 illustrated the enthusiasm of the local police, prosecutors and magistrate and mentions the bridge and its parapet.:

    Some time ago a respectable inhabitant of Bere Island, while waiting for some of his boat's crew, happened to lean against the parapet of Brandy Hall Bridge, upon which he beat time with his cane to some old Irish tune which he whistled for his amusement. He was seen by a policeman, questioned, summoned "for maliciously injuring the public works" and fined.

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 23/Aug/2020 14:48:51

    Skibbereen & West Carbery Eagle; or, South Western Advertiser - Saturday 20 January 1866 Skibbereen & West Carbery Eagle; or, South Western Advertiser - Saturday 20 January 1866 Is the 'parapet' referred to here the wall in the foreground, looking somewhat the worse for wear after 50 years or so? [Edit] No, because as far as I can see, it isn't the Castletown to Bantry road.

  • profile

    henrylyne

    • 25/Aug/2020 14:34:32

    John Spooner the Castletownbere to Bantry road runs from right to left in this photo and I expect the parapet is the wall on the sides of the bridge that you can see some people leaning on. The photo is taken from a side road.

  • profile

    Dr. Ilia

    • 02/Sep/2020 08:00:07

    Great shot!