Jaywalkers Central in the southern capital

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A lively scene on the quays in Cork is today's image from the seldom visited O'Connor Collection. The rules of the road are being abused left, right and centre with one man reading his paper as he walks along. In the meantime some dockers are busy watching the action in the boats below the quay wall!

Photographer: Fergus O’Connor

Collection: Fergus O’Connor Collection

Date: Circa 1900 - 1920

NLI Ref: OCO 314

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 8991
ferguso’connor ferguso’connorcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland corkcity countycork quays tram motorcar jaywalkers pedestrians ships pi317 π

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  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 18/Aug/2020 08:00:02

    PI 317 . . .

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 18/Aug/2020 08:03:01

    Second thoughts, pi = 3.1415926535 8979323846 2643383279 5028841971 6939937510 5820974944 5923078164 0628620899 8628034825 3421170679 . . .

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    Foxglove

    • 18/Aug/2020 08:05:15

    barefoot child, right corner, no dogs with " docked" tail

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    cargeofg

    • 18/Aug/2020 08:30:21

    Bitumen boiler on quayside. Dockside area is cobbled. But there is a pile of sand in background. Roadmending or been used to do caulking on ships decks or between planks if carvel built.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 18/Aug/2020 08:52:07

    Streetview

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    sharon.corbet

    • 18/Aug/2020 09:13:28

    The original City Hall seen here was destroyed in 1920 by the Black and Tans, and replaced in 1932-6 by the one in the Streetview.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/Aug/2020 09:16:19

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia I thought you were finally cracking up on us there for a moment but I see that you figured out that the Cork people are natural mathematicians and understand PI to the nth degree!

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    John Spooner

    • 18/Aug/2020 09:19:02

    If I'm not mistaken (and I might well be), as featured in The Young Offenders, although I admit I recognised it from [https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet]'s streetview . Screenshot_2020-08-18_10-05-17 And by the way I spotted the Gunpowder Office in an episode of the current series.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 18/Aug/2020 09:29:01

    I think this is after 1911 'cos of that weird bridge, but I can't find the link I had . . . Ed - www.buildingsofireland.ie/buildings-search/building/20508... Clontarf Bridge - Scherzer rolling lift bascule bridge, erected 1911. 197 feet long, four span (opening span of 62 feet) bridge resting on six concrete filled steel caissons having cast iron parapets. Bridge reconstructed in 1981, and no longer opening. ... ... Its mechanism is the same as that of the Chicago River Bridge, and the steel spans were supplied by the Cleveland Bridge and Engineering Company. The bridge has important links to this part of the city, having been driven in the past by current received from the former Albert Road power station.

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    CASSIDY PHOTOGRAPHY

    • 18/Aug/2020 09:30:08

    The best thing about this photo, nobody wearing headphones or using a mobile phone.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 18/Aug/2020 09:35:20

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/cassidyphotography Instead there's a guy walking across the road, while intent in a newspaper. Technology may change, but behaviour obviously doesn't.

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    cargeofg

    • 18/Aug/2020 10:08:16

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/cassidyphotography https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet There is also a boy next the lampost looking at a book. Nothing changes only the medium that you are distracted by.

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    O Mac

    • 18/Aug/2020 10:56:30

    PI 317, was registered to one J. Jermyn, Mahon, Blackrock, Cork.................1914 -1915 Irish Motor Directory Photo taken post 1913

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    abandoned railways

    • 18/Aug/2020 11:55:44

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet The guy in street view is a well known bus driver, carrying his change box, on his way to the depot.

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    suckindeesel

    • 18/Aug/2020 17:41:29

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] Are we sure that is Clontaf Bridge and not the earlier Parnell swing bridge? bit.ly/3gcB2bM

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    sharon.corbet

    • 18/Aug/2020 19:40:45

    On the same spot in 1883: https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/11081361686/

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    sharon.corbet

    • 18/Aug/2020 19:48:29

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] This is taken at the corner of Parnell Bridge - it’s directly to the left, where the tram tracks are headed. [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] is referring to the bridge in the background, which isn’t on the 25” but is on the Cassini. You can watch a video of the old Parnell Bridge being demolished in 1968. Further discussion of the history of the bridges at this spot can be found here: [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/27319173083]

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 18/Aug/2020 19:55:18

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I’m a bit confused where 1913 is coming from, did you mean 1903?

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    suckindeesel

    • 18/Aug/2020 19:56:52

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet How could I ever doubt him?

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    O Mac

    • 18/Aug/2020 21:06:45

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ That car in front of the tram, PI 317, is not listed in the 1911-1912 Irish Motor Directory ( as registrations only go up as far as PI 80 something) It could be listed in the 1912-1913 directory but unfortunately that's not available online.. NLI have their own private, won't show it to anyone, copy.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 18/Aug/2020 21:57:45

    The π-mobile looks very new underneath, via megazoom. Mr O'Connor thoughtfully supplied a 'Similar Item', at 12:30, from the other side of the water. Might provide a few more clues; the Parnell Bridge is open (how did that work for electric trams on the rest of the line?) and that weird Clontarf Bridge is closed. Anyone find an explanation how it worked; which bit went where, as the actress said to the bishop? Was the tank on top filled with water as a counterweight? - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000290337

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 19/Aug/2020 08:15:03

    How the Scherzer rolling lift bascule bridge worked - this is a model of a 1913 one - youtu.be/Zue6eoTtKIY . That thing on the back is a heavy counterweight and it rolls on the large curve instead of a pivot point, so that a relatively small electric motor could work it. Evidently they are susceptible to wind!

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 19/Aug/2020 08:24:52

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Ah, I missed that there was a 1911-12 directory available, and thought you might have meant from 1903 when the PI started being used. It's interesting seeing how fast the number of cars increased between 1911 and 1914, compared to between 1903 and 1911.

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 19/Aug/2020 08:34:07

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] There are 2 in the docklands area of Dublin - see here complete with a 1913 Scherzer Rolling Lift Bridge Co. ad.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 19/Aug/2020 10:05:17

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet Thank you!

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    suckindeesel

    • 19/Aug/2020 16:29:35

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Or 22/7, close enough for government work

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    suckindeesel

    • 19/Aug/2020 17:13:09

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] Here's a link to an article about the swivel bridge archiseek.com/2010/1880-parnell-bridge-cork/ From that other view with the bridge open, it looks like the swivel portion has its own separate catenaries for the tram. How they rejoined the other catenaries when the bridge closed beats me. However, services on each side of the open bridge wouldn't necessarily be affected as it would be normal practice to supply the overhead and rail at several points to reduce voltage drop and more importantly reduce voltage drop in the return (rails) to limit the return current flowing to ground resulting in electrolytic corrosion in buried service pipes.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 19/Aug/2020 21:43:41

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Thanks - you are a bright spark!

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    suckindeesel

    • 19/Aug/2020 22:18:28

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia The 25" also shows two "landing piers", one each side of bridge, which look like they would have met the open ends of the swivel section and allowed access. Of course, could simply have been to stop ships mooring to close.