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Where: Munster, Waterford, Ireland

Try to find the spot where the photographer was standing.

When: 11 October 1928

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
Virtual sticky buns to the first contributor who posts the correct number and species of the dead animals on view in this photo. I would have to say that this is not one of the best produced by the Poole organisation. What were they doing (or trying to do) with the whiteout above the heads in the back row? Perhaps it was because the building looks like an animal shelter of some kind?

This is a fancy, and by the look of it, a wealthy group indeed. The photo was commissioned by Miss Moore, Ocean View, Tramore. We fully expect the detailed family histories of all involved to magically appear in the comments below.

Photographer: A. H. Poole

Collection: Poole Photographic Collection, Waterford

Date: Thursday, 11 October 1928

NLI Ref: POOLEWP 3586

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 11938
ahpoole arthurhenripoole glassnegative nationallibraryofireland tramore waterford missmoore moore oceanview munster weddinggroup wedding furs fox tophats hats bouquet flowers spaceagehat spats frocks marymoore henryboardman gilbertboardman johnmoore peopleidentified thursday october 1928 1920s poolephotographiccollection 20thcentury

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  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 12/Aug/2020 05:58:12

    Notice how I never once mentioned the space age hat!

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    davehanley1

    • 12/Aug/2020 06:23:39

    A pretty grim looking lot!!

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 12/Aug/2020 06:48:38

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] You might say that I couldn't possibly comment.

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    Foxglove

    • 12/Aug/2020 08:02:24

    I could push for "dog" but it's a related canine - fox

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 12/Aug/2020 08:06:35

    11 October 1928 was a Thursday . . . No expense spared on the background. Even worse here - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000594203 . Not to mention the bridesmaid's frocks!

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 12/Aug/2020 08:10:49

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia I agree, surely they could have found a better location to take the photos!

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    sharon.corbet

    • 12/Aug/2020 08:18:55

    Here is the marriage record. The wedding was between Mary Moore and Henry Boardman, in the Methodist Church in Tramore.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 12/Aug/2020 09:22:12

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet Thanks, Sharon.

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    John A. Coffey

    • 12/Aug/2020 09:22:59

    Skulk marbh ?

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    sharon.corbet

    • 12/Aug/2020 09:25:00

    According to an article in the Waterford Standard of 13th October 1928, the wedding party included: Best Man: William G. Martin (cousin of the Bride) Bridesmaids: Miss Beth Moore, Miss Anna Moore, Miss Marie Moore, Miss Beenie Moore, Miss Gretta Moore (sisters of the Bride) Miss Patricia Watt (niece of the bridegroom) Page: Master Daniel Moore (brother of the bride) Celebrant: Rev. W.S. Morris The bride wore a cream satin medieval frock embroidered with pearls and a Limerick Lace veil. The bridesmaids wore Kate Greenaway frocks of pale pink and white organdi with poke bonnets. The bride's mother wore a powder blue lace frock embroidered in silver, with hat to match and white fox fur. The groom's mother wore a black corded silk coat and smart black hat.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 12/Aug/2020 09:28:33

    Oh, and the reception was held at the home of the bride's mother, which would have been Ocean View.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 12/Aug/2020 09:41:29

    Here they are at the Methodist Church Tramore, with confetti - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000594205

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    sharon.corbet

    • 12/Aug/2020 09:44:30

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Featuring the "spectacular and imposing" bodyguard of Girl Guides.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 12/Aug/2020 09:45:36

    Ocean View Guest House was still owned by the Moores in 2000 and housed asylum-seekers - www.irishtimes.com/news/tramore-locals-make-asylum-seeker... Streetview - goo.gl/maps/Acqmh4VyyQ9mTTwF8. The building behind (ed. marked as a Lifeboat House on the old maps) looks like it might be guilty of this backdrop (?)

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 12/Aug/2020 09:56:50

    Tramore Methodist Church on the OSI 25" (it's now gone and replaced by shops.) Ocean View on the OSI 25"

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    sharon.corbet

    • 12/Aug/2020 10:07:26

    Here are Mary Moore and family in the 1911 Census with two of the bridesmaids (Elizabeth and Anna).

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 12/Aug/2020 10:47:14

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Great work, A+

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    derangedlemur

    • 12/Aug/2020 13:09:19

    2nd from the right in the front row looks like Timothy Dalton has stolen Professor Jimmy Edwards' moustache.

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    Bernard Healy

    • 12/Aug/2020 13:12:10

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet] I feel as though the dress choices say something about the bride's taste. The fact that her own dress is described as being "medieval" is rather telling. I know _nothing_ about wedding fashions, but going for a medieval style frock strikes me as something I'd associate with the late-Victorians rather than 1928. Ditto the bridesmaids' dresses. I looked up Kate Greenaway on Wiki en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kate_Greenaway She was an illustrator of childrens' books who died in 1901. The following paragraphs touch on her influence on fashion: Greenaway's paintings were reproduced by chromoxylography, by which the colours were printed from hand-engraved wood blocks by the firm of Edmund Evans.[21] Through the 1880s and 1890s, her only rivals in popularity in children's book illustration were Walter Crane and Randolph Caldecott. "Kate Greenaway" children, all of them girls and boys too young to be put in trousers, were dressed in her own versions of late 18th century and Regency fashions: smock-frocks and skeleton suits for boys, high-waisted pinafores and dresses with mobcaps and straw bonnets for girls. The influence of children's clothes in portraits by British painter John Hoppner (1758–1810) may have provided her some inspiration. Liberty of London adapted Kate Greenaway's drawings as designs for actual children's clothes. A full generation of mothers in the liberal-minded "artistic" British circles who called themselves The Souls and embraced the Arts and Crafts movement dressed their daughters in Kate Greenaway pantaloons and bonnets in the 1880s and 1890s. The style was often used by painter Maude Goodman in her depictions of children. I'm not sure whether the outfit worn by the pageboy is exactly a "skeleton suit" or not, but it's certainly in the same neighbourhood & seems to reflect a style that is not the norm for the late 1920s. Likewise the "poke bonnets" worn by the girls - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poke_bonnet They were in fashion in the early 1800s - around the same time period as Jane Austen's novels. I'm not sure what conclusions one wants to draw from the style in this photo, but it strikes me as being different to the more conventional designs worn in most of the other wedding portraits we see coming from the Poole studio.

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 12/Aug/2020 13:21:49

    I'll add that a quick look at the 1911 Census shows only about a dozen Methodist households in Tramore. www.census.nationalarchives.ie/search/results.jsp?census_... One can only imagine that a local wedding was a big deal for the local Methodist community at the time. One can also understand why the Methodist Church/Meeting House failed to survive in Tramore. The minority Protestant denominations found it hard to sustain themselves after the foundation of the Free State. Note how most of the Tramore Methodists in 1911 were born elsewhere. There are probably a whole variety of social and political reasons for the unusual profile of the community.

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    derangedlemur

    • 12/Aug/2020 13:23:12

    If that's the medieval frock in the picture then "medieval" is either a misprint of some sort or an outright lie.

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    Bernard Healy

    • 12/Aug/2020 13:49:33

    BTW, what happened to the Methodist church in Tramore? There's a useful resource here: methodisthistoryireland.org/index-of-irish-methodist-chur... Built by Thomas Wilson, local preacher. CHC.iii.329; In 1863 he contributed £1,000 at Jubilee Missionary Meeting. Sold 1995 to Mr Patrick Early for £37,000. It was built in 1831 per the same page.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 12/Aug/2020 14:02:10

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] I double-checked the article, and the typo wasn't on my side at least. I'd possibly put it down to journalistic "license". [https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy] According to Streetview, the site of the Methodist Church has looked like this for the last 10 years at least.

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    Bernard Healy

    • 12/Aug/2020 14:22:04

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet I'd love to know what it looked like before it was sold/demolished, and until when it was in operation as a church... Can't even find a decent picture online. Re: the medieval dress, you'd have to think that the newspaper description came from the bride or one of her family. It strikes me as being medieval in the sense of being like something that a pre-raphaelite artist would paint rather than medieval medieval, if you know what I mean.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 12/Aug/2020 15:22:09

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy] Yeah, I went looking earlier, and only found where the church was by wandering around the OSI map. However, I did find a A Glimpse of Other Days from 1987 in the Waterford Library local history library. The Methodist Church is mentioned on page 48, and it sounds like it was still in use, though shared with the Presbyterians.

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    suckindeesel

    • 12/Aug/2020 16:34:31

    Could it possibly be a style of old-fashioned dress favoured by a small isolated religious sect?

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    Bernard Healy

    • 12/Aug/2020 18:15:13

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ I’ll happily defer to anyone who knows better, but that’s not the reputation that Irish Methodism would have. Whilst relatively small in number, it would have been a pretty ‘mainstream’ kind of Protestantism.

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    derangedlemur

    • 12/Aug/2020 18:54:43

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet I was, of course, not suggesting that you would be misrepresenting the dress. It would appear to be a dress in the style of art nouveau representations of medieval - common enough in pictures by the likes of W. H. Robinson, Rackham, Beardsley et al, but not by any stretch representative of actual medieval dress.

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    silverio10

    • 12/Aug/2020 19:27:22

    Buena serie de fotos antiguas .

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    suckindeesel

    • 12/Aug/2020 19:45:23

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy You're correct I'm sure, just mere speculation on my part. They are an oddly dressed bunch of people all the same.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 12/Aug/2020 21:06:43

    Interesting about Kate Greenaway; lots of her 'stuff' on Flickr, including an 1899 calendar via https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/2719045199/ And the 'Ocean View' in 2009 via https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/3486592377/

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 12/Aug/2020 21:21:58

    What about the dead animals? How fugly was that? As always, Oscar said it best, "And, after all, what is a fashion? From the artistic point of view, it is usually a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months.” Oscar Wilde, 'The Importance of Being Earnest'

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    Secret Sheridan

    • 13/Aug/2020 08:10:36

    The gentleman at the front with the moustache reminds me of Patrick Stewart if he had hair!

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    runningwithbulls.com

    • 14/Aug/2020 07:33:00

    I fully expect the Tramore crowd to leap into action and provide detailed history. I'm from Tramore, but been living away for +15 years, so my information may be sketchy. I'm presuming these ancients are the relatives of the Moore family who still own the Ocean View house. @sharon.corbet: That corner of priest's road has been like that for 20+ years. I've been trying to find older photos of the corner but can't yet.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 14/Aug/2020 08:02:24

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet https://www.flickr.com/photos/runningwithbulls I have added Sharon to this comment so that she get a notification to have another look. Thanks for your comment, Mary

  • profile

    runningwithbulls.com

    • 14/Aug/2020 08:35:48

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ ah couldn't figure out how to mention someone in my comment on the Flickr mobile app. Thanks Mary.