Mount Jerome Cemetery

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Where: Leinster, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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Sometimes I think it is a little bit ghoulish but I find visiting cemeteries quite fascinating! Seeing the details of those residents/citizens who have passed on to their eternal reward can give you such an insight to the place and the people that often you cannot obtain from the buildings! Mount Jerome is out there on the south side so I am not too familiar with it, and will watch with interest to see what develops!

Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Circa 1865-1914 1879-1914 (thanks BeachcomberAustralia)

NLI Ref: L_CAB_02861

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 8632
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio glassnegative nationallibraryofireland mountjeromecemetery graveyard tombstones headstones monuments johnireland herculesellis dublin ireland leinster mountjerome haroldscross cemetery graves lawrencephotographcollection

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 07/Aug/2020 08:13:29

    Oooo! My g-g-g-g-uncle Jonathan Henn resides in Mount Jerome Cemetery since 1873. Part 23, No. 3428. *hastens to megazoom ...*

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    suckindeesel

    • 07/Aug/2020 08:27:08

    As do my parents and grandparents

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 07/Aug/2020 10:37:21

    There is a GoogleMaps googlesphere 2018 very close by, where eight paths meet and a fountain marked on the 25" map. I think this is the right direction for this photo - goo.gl/maps/3NJcJTErg1VGBx79A And this view, a quarter turn to the right - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000337599 - is more easily recognizable - goo.gl/maps/PUU43EqLvgM3w28s7

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    cargeofg

    • 07/Aug/2020 10:53:07

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia On the photo 2860 via your link you can now see two other compass points N and W. I shall remove the ? from the photo note.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 07/Aug/2020 10:57:04

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Indeed. Likewise this - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000337597 on the googlesphere - goo.gl/maps/zKsxWYNfJsFXMSxt7

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    suckindeesel

    • 07/Aug/2020 13:01:10

    I think this is the spot, looking north, this was the centre of the original Victorian cemetery, where the main avenues intersected. Map: www.mountjerome.ie/?map=mount-jerome-cemetery-map On extreme magnification it is possible to see what might be St. Patrick's Tower in Thomas St. with a church steeple behind. Google Earth Link earth.app.goo.gl/nw2P4u #googleearth

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    Bernard Healy

    • 07/Aug/2020 13:27:47

    I've marked the Clock from what is now Griffith College on the picture. It used to be the Wellington Barracks. www.buildingsofireland.ie/buildings-search/building/50080... Can anyone identify the church tower next to it?

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    Bernard Healy

    • 07/Aug/2020 13:40:54

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I'm sorry that I didn't see your comment. I think you're right about it being St Patrick's Cathedral. I think the angles line up if you take the clock tower to be at Wellington Barracks. I was looking for a candidate closer than the Cathedral, but I don't know what else it could be.

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    cargeofg

    • 07/Aug/2020 14:23:52

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy St Patricks on the RTE News this morning about is roof and associated refurbsishments.

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    suckindeesel

    • 07/Aug/2020 17:24:52

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy Yes, has to be the Wellington Barracks clock tower (0.8-km approx) and St. Patrick's (1.8-km approx) as they both line up on the map. Hard to date photo by the gravestones as the scene looks much the same today. These monuments etc would be among the original markers from the early to late 19th century. A necropolis with a pop. of 300,000

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    suckindeesel

    • 07/Aug/2020 17:40:42

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I remember the street outside St Patrick's being altered to move it further away in order to protect its foundations from damage caused by the vibration of passing traffic.

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    suckindeesel

    • 07/Aug/2020 20:09:55

    'The living come with grassy tread To read the gravestones on the hill; The graveyard draws the living still, But never anymore the dead' Robert Frost

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 07/Aug/2020 21:42:05

    Guessing all these photos are the same day sometime in the 1880s, due to the presence of 'ghosts' (in a cemetery!) caused by long exposure even though outside on a bright day. Has to be after 1879 because of the memorial on the right, which is new but not sparkling new. Also the 'condensed' typeface used in the photos' titles seems to have been the style in earlier decades (pre 1890s?). The letters are elongated 'portrait' style rather than square. I have noticed this in old photos of Australia too. Could well be wrong - discuss! Interested by the various shield-shaped white signs with forbidding information about the grave plots. The place was a flourishing business. Easiest to see on this one - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000337597 . Right of burial is granted for one year within which period grave can be purchased for £4. SECTION B After one year no further interments will be permitted unless the grave is purchased.

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    suckindeesel

    • 08/Aug/2020 12:36:06

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Bit of a bargain that £4, equivalent to about £500 today. Current prices in Mt. Jerome range from €5,000 to €15,000 for a 3 coffin grave. This is just another sign of inflation as 4 coffins was the tradional capacity of graves in the past.

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    suckindeesel

    • 08/Aug/2020 16:18:46

    RTE video of Mt.Jerome facing closure in 1984 www.rte.ie/archives/2019/0724/1065009-mount-jerome-cemete... It was subsequently purchased by Masseys undertakers Another RTE video, from 1971: 'Digging graves for a living' www.rte.ie/archives/2016/0601/792504-paudge-the-gravedigger/ The first Catholic burial was in 1920 when Glasnevin was temporarily closed due to industrial action. It also contains a small Muslim plot since 1968. Some famous people interred there: William Carleton (1794-1869) Writer and Poet Thomas Kirk (1781-1845) Sculptor William Wilde (1815-1876) Doctor ad Father of Oscar Wilde Alexander Findlater (1797-1873) Food and Drink Merchant Arthur Guinness the Second (1768-1855) Guinness Brewery Jacob Owen (1778-1870) Architect and Engineer Sir Richard Griffith (1784-1878) Geologist Sir Richard Morrison (1767-1849) Architect William C. Plunket (1828-1897) Fourth Lord Plunket and Archbishop of Dublin John Millington Synge (1871-1909) Writer Jack Butler Yeats (1871-1957) Artist George Fitzmaurice (1877-1963) Playwright Robert Graves (1796-1853) Physician Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu (1814-1873) Writer AE Russell (1867-1935) Writer and Artist Sir William Rowan Hamilton (1805-1865) Mathematician and Astronomer Thomas Davis (1814-1845) Writer and Irish Patriot Thomas Drummond (1797-1840) Under Secretary of Ireland 1835-1840 The Huguenots (1713-1830) Bindon Blood Stoney (1828-1909) Engineer Abraham Colles (1773-1843) Surgeon RIC DMP

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    RETRO STU

    • 09/Aug/2020 11:20:38

    Looks so well kept then!