Adieu, my friends, adieu!

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I have no plans of going anywhere but Mr. Mason’s ship leaving harbour prompted the title! The title in the catalogue speculates that this may indicate a new process, perhaps the rivetting? The actual title is “Workman Clark & Co. 4: Belfast. Looks rivetted; new process?”. Can anyone throw some light on that?

Collection: Mason Photographic Collection

Date: 1890 - 1910

NLI Ref: M3/14

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 8747
thomasholmesmason thomasmayne thomashmasonsonslimited lanternslides nationallibraryofireland workmanclarkco belfast belfastlough ship shipbuilding stern screw wake ulster northernireland

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    John Spooner

    • 24/Jul/2020 07:54:29

    The name on the stern looks as if it ends "... Ireland". Workman Clark built a "Star of England" so I guess this might possibly be a sister ship, built for J P Corry From www.red-duster.co.uk/wp/2016/02/11/james-p-corry-co/ (which shows that most if not all of their ships were Star of ..)

    STAR OF IRELAND was built in 1903 by Workman, Clark & Co. at Belfast with a tonnage of 4331grt, a length of 380ft, a beam of 48ft 8in and a service speed of 12 knots. She was built specifically for the South American meat trade and virtually an updated version of the Star of Victoria. Although she was refrigerated and as large as some of the other vessels in the fleet she was not transferred to the Commonwealth & Dominion Line and in 1915 was sold to Nelson Steam Navigation Co. of Belfast with H & W Nelson Ltd as managers for use on a similar trade. She was renamed Highland Star by the new company in 1916. In 1927 she was laid up at Dunston-on-Tyne and broken up in 1930 by Thos. W. Ward at Inverkeithing.

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    John Spooner

    • 24/Jul/2020 07:58:17

    Launched at high water on 29th June 1903 according to the report in the Northern Whig on Tuesday 30 June 1903 with an extensive description, but no mention of a new process or rivetting

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    Foxglove

    • 24/Jul/2020 08:09:49

    as the image proceeds from stern to bow (I have googled me nautical terms me lads) the riveted plates become almost like cladding, this looks unusual to my totally untrained eye

  • profile

    Foxglove

    • 24/Jul/2020 08:11:05

    oh oh ! there are no (sea) dogs visible

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    O Mac

    • 24/Jul/2020 08:17:53

    It's possible that the catalogue person found the ship riveting.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 24/Jul/2020 08:22:10

    Via Trove - 1903 description with some technical details (nothing riveting) - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/14567095 1904 visit to Sydney, Australia, with names of crew (sea dogs) - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/14644655 Edit - And she departed Brisbane for London via South African ports in January 1906 carrying ... 1,500 bales of wool 1,200 boxes of butter 3,050 quarters of frozen beef 450 carcass of pork 60 crates of frozen sundries trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/174723142

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    John Spooner

    • 24/Jul/2020 08:32:16

    Trials in Belfast Lough and adjustment of compasses on August 18th 1903, then off to the Bristol Channel to pick up cargo for her maiden voyage Barry to New York, under the command of Kearney (Lloyd's List - Saturday 22 August 1903)

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    John Spooner

    • 24/Jul/2020 08:39:05

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/foxglove Same here, but probably normal for the time because the (odd to us and the NLI cataloguer) hull gets no mention in the descriptions in the press, which do, however, have some ripe nautical terms, favourite being "long topgallant forecastle".

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    cargeofg

    • 24/Jul/2020 08:53:09

    Ships were riveted up to the Second World War. Welding then became the norm as it was faster. German U boats were sinking ships faster that the Allies could build them. There were 2710 Liberty ships built between 1941-1945. The Calfifornia Shipbuilding Corp holds the record for delivering 20 Liberty ships in the month of June 1943.

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    John Spooner

    • 24/Jul/2020 09:15:43

    "Rivet boy" was an occupation in shipbuilding at least as early as 1869 (when a Jarrow shipbuilding company was prosecuted for employing an 11-year-old for more than 6 hours a day), and was also used to describe workers on the Britannia Bridge 20 years earlier. If only I could ask my great-grandfather who was a shipsmith/blacksmith in King's Lynn and London east-end shipyards from the 1840s to about 1900.

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    John Carson Essex UK

    • 24/Jul/2020 09:35:42

    Lovely photo but sadly is nothing to do with Tall ships so we must remove it from the Tallships group if you keep posting non topic Photos we will be forced to remove you from the group

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    John Spooner

    • 24/Jul/2020 09:55:22

    Workman and Clark riveters in action. (Sunday Post - Sunday 09 June 1918) Sunday Post - Sunday 09 June 1918 For his world records John Moir drove in 1,115 rivets in one hour then followed it up with the nine-hour record, 11,209 seven-eighth inch rivets in nine hours. Four boys supplying red-hot rivets, men fanned him as he worked, and juice was piped to him through a rubber tube. Everything for the record was set up by the company, there was an observer from Lloyds, and after the day's work he was carried shoulder-high by his fellow workers. This effectively brought an end to the rivetting rivalry between the great shipbulding companies. In early 1918 the record had passed from William Moses of Barrow (5894), William Smith of John Brown, Clydebank (6783) and John Lowry of Harland and Wolff (7841). It may be a coincidence, but following his record, John Moir's health suffered (in one case requiring a blood transfusion).

  • profile

    cargeofg

    • 24/Jul/2020 09:56:42

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosie_the_Riveter [https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] Rivet girls. The mother of a friend of mine in Wiltshire was a riveters mate in the GWR railworks in Swindon during the Second World War

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 24/Jul/2020 10:12:44

    🐸 rivet rivet 🐸

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    cargeofg

    • 24/Jul/2020 10:13:45

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Probably suffered from Vibration White finger (VWF) or Hand/Arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) Industrial injury from prolonged use of vibrating hand held machinery. Loggers suffered it from chainsaws and miners from drills.

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    John Spooner

    • 24/Jul/2020 10:15:33

    In one of the reports, there's a possible clue to what the catalogue person may have been referring to. In making a speech to John Moir after his record, Sir William Clark said it was a record for hydraulic riveting. Could it be that the Star of Ireland was an early example of hydraulic riveting rather than bashing with a big hammer or some sort of non-hydraulic machinery? Much learned discussion here www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/antique-machinery-and-histo... Shipbuilders were using hydraulic riveting machines in the 1880s, but newspaper reports, as far as I can see, describe them as being used in boilermanking. Perhaps riveting the hulls hydraulically came later? 1903?

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    John Spooner

    • 24/Jul/2020 10:28:26

    A long report on the construction of the Celtic, in the Belfast News-Letter of Friday 05 April 1901 states:

    "Long gap hydraulic riveters and electric drilling machines were used extensively ... It should be noticed in passing that, as in the case of the Oceanic, machine riveting was adopted wherever possible in the keel, double bottom, hull and stringer"
    So if it was worthy of note in 1901, it might still be regarded as a new process in 1903?

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    John Spooner

    • 24/Jul/2020 10:45:35

    In September 1902 the New Ross Standard pointed out that the thick hull of such vessel as the Cedric could not be achieved without a hydraulic riveter, (i.e. hydraulic riveting enabled much thicker steel to be used) and perhaps the cataloguer was speculating from the appearance of the hull and its thick plates that the new hydraulic process had been used.

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    John Spooner

    • 24/Jul/2020 11:47:14

    The description of this British Pathe clip says "Riveting. Location of events unknown." but I'm sure this must be John Moir setting the riveting record youtu.be/wv7r71s2yls

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 24/Jul/2020 11:56:31

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner I was thinking "Empress of Ireland" but she had two stacks. This is probably the Star.

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    John Spooner

    • 24/Jul/2020 13:01:36

    She looks very clean and new - the white bits of paintwork look unblemished. And she's sitting high in the water. Which lead me to wonder if this is the trial trip in Belfast Lough on August 18th 1903.

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    suckindeesel

    • 24/Jul/2020 19:47:50

    Although all iron ships were riveted at the time, there does seem to be something different about this one as the plates appear more prominent than usual. Perhaps a new method of caulking was employed?

  • profile

    CASSIDY PHOTOGRAPHY

    • 25/Jul/2020 01:39:05

    Are any of the folks viewing and commenting on this photograph, photographers? Can anyone tell from a photographic perspective why the panels seem to be more pronounced? Look on the right side of the ship and then on the left side. The Sun is on the right side of the ship and reflected off the water. Thus, more contrast is created in any shadow. So, the aft facing seams, away from the Sun have deeper shadow and give the optical impression of being deeper and thicker. They might be, but that is the reason for it. If the ship was coming into port, then the panels would appear smoother and less rough hewn. Refer to this website- www.red-duster.co.uk/wp/2016/02/11/james-p-corry-co/ It states the Star of Ireland Steam Ship was built in 1903. "STAR OF IRELAND was built in 1903 by Workman, Clark & Co. at Belfast with a tonnage of 4331grt, a length of 380ft, a beam of 48ft 8in and a service speed of 12 knots. " "She was renamed Highland Star by the new company in 1916. In 1927 she was laid up at Dunston-on-Tyne and broken up in 1930 by Thos. W. Ward at Inverkeithing." 2 February 1905 has this- trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/192235494

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    nintytwo

    • 31/Jul/2020 20:11:59

    I sailed as a Radio Officer in the 1960s. One ship I sailed on was riveted and at sea in the Pacific she sprung a plate i.e. the riveting gave way. The standard repair procedural was used. The ships carpenter made a wooden frame around the offending plate and mixed up cement and and poured it in and made a big concrete patch which served us for the rest of the voyage. As far as I can remember this had been a liberty ship and was still sailing in the 60s. In Newport News in Virginia whilst anchored in the river we saw one liberty ship a day being towed down the river to a breakers, and they had been doing this every day since the end of the war 17 years previously. There apparently was a huge graveyard of Liberty ships somewhere upriver. If those ships had made one transatlantic crossing they had fulfilled their purpose.