Val Doonican’s “Marvellous Toy”!

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Where: Unknown

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When: 01 January 1900

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We opened the week with an engineering drawing of Monsieur Papin’s “Digester”, and so we end the week with another engineering drawing of a very complex piece of machinery. It reminded Morning Mary for one, of a song by the late Waterford-born singer Val Doonican, “The Marvellous Toy” – www.youtube.com/watch?v=BdJ0m8Rj5-Y

Collection: Mason Photographic Collection

Date: 1890 - 1910

NLI Ref: M23/56/8

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 9159
thomasholmesmason thomasmayne thomashmasonsonslimited lanternslides nationallibraryofireland engineeringdrawing machineplans flywheel gauge valdoonican marvelloustoy engineering

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  • profile

    Auparavant

    • 10/Jul/2020 08:05:19

    Interesting explanations. Thank you

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    Foxglove

    • 10/Jul/2020 08:10:09

    does it spin a "yarn" and wooley jumpers

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    Niall McAuley

    • 10/Jul/2020 08:15:12

    First impression is a vertical twin cylinder steam engine driving a generator.

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    cargeofg

    • 10/Jul/2020 08:20:53

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley On the buttons a bit quicker that me. Just the same comment as I was going to post. Steam intake pipes at top and you can see some wires leading away from stator/field coils.

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    cargeofg

    • 10/Jul/2020 08:30:20

    www.smithsonianmag.com/history/charles-proteus-steinmetz-... The initials on the drawing are not the same but based on the link the generator in the Ford Plant was called a Steinmetz but Charles P Steinmetz was called in to fix it.

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    CASSIDY PHOTOGRAPHY

    • 10/Jul/2020 08:32:07

    Electrical Generator.

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    O Mac

    • 10/Jul/2020 08:49:32

    looks like it's driving a tachometer.

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    John Spooner

    • 10/Jul/2020 09:38:44

    Another Steinmetz engraving

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    Carol Maddock

    • 10/Jul/2020 10:06:29

    Apologies for veering wildly off-topic, but if there are any cricket buffs among you, could you please have a glance at this photograph below, and tell us what Ned Murphy's bumpy rubbery thing is. It's for a sports thing... https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/5945646503/

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    John Spooner

    • 10/Jul/2020 10:35:46

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] It's the back of his batting glove. I remember playing with similar gloves, but individual fingers with rubber spikes rather than the whole back of the hand. Nowadays the protection on the backs of gloves resembles sausages. There are sets of batting gloves for right handers and left handers. A right hander needs protection for his or her right thumb, but not the left. And vice versa. The ones I remember were like this ehive.com/collections/3255/objects/281052/gloves-early-20...

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    suckindeesel

    • 10/Jul/2020 10:43:04

    Two centrifical governors

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    John Spooner

    • 10/Jul/2020 10:46:52

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] The left glove looks as if it offers more substantial protection to the back of his hand than what we can see of the right glove (which need to protect the fingers more), so I'd guess tentatively that Ned was right-handed.

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    John Spooner

    • 10/Jul/2020 11:01:07

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] And it looks as if his is of a type where the thumb is separate from but connected by a strap to the finger bit. From what I recall, you put the fingers in their bit, then wound the strap round your wrist and put the thumb in its place. It meant that your palms were bare when gripping that bat.

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    suckindeesel

    • 10/Jul/2020 12:20:28

    Looks earlier than C.P., could it be an engraving by E. Steinmetz who did technical stuff? Here's one of his engravings www.ssplprints.com/image/113587/steinmetz-e-the-wimshurst...

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    Carol Maddock

    • 10/Jul/2020 12:51:03

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Thanks a million, John! Lovely gem that Ned may have been right-handed...

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 10/Jul/2020 13:37:39

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley The large "wheel" to the right looks like it has copper-wound blades in it, generator would be my thought or an electrical engine if you supplied current to it.

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 10/Jul/2020 13:41:41

    It looks a lot like this generator shown here, circa 1895. Steinmetz was from Schenectady, New York. edisontechcenter.org/CharlesProteusSteinmetz.html and this photo of steam generators at a plant in New York City, look almost identical. dailygazette.com/article/2017/09/03/from-home-to-space-ge...

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    jamica1

    • 10/Jul/2020 15:00:45

    Very nice item

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    suckindeesel

    • 10/Jul/2020 20:02:45

    Doesn't look like any AC generator, which CP helped to develope, that I'm familiar with, the rotor windings are unusual, appear to have two,sets of windings.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 10/Jul/2020 21:14:08

    I wonder if "Ned Murphy's bumpy rubbery thing" also made weird noises ...

    🎶 It went "zip" when it moved And "bop" when it stopped And "whirr" when it stood still I never knew just what it was and I guess I never will. 🎶

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    arensee

    • 10/Jul/2020 21:56:48

    Lovely drawing ! Reminds me of a poem called "The Diagonal Steam Trap " by Crawford Howard ! Listen to it here.. youtu.be/IxUXviafW94 Enjoy !