Sitting on the bridge below the town...

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Where: Leinster, County Wexford, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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The bridge in Enniscorthy beneath the shadow of the castle is today’s image from the Poole Collection. I love the corner boys sitting on the parapet of the bridge, sharing that male companionship of gossip, slagging, and watching the world go by!

Photographer: A. H. Poole

Collection: The Poole Photographic Collection, Waterford

Date: Deffo after 1919 (Frigidaire brand)

NLI Ref: POOLEWP 3854

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 9094
ahpoole arthurhenripoole glassnegative nationallibraryofireland enniscorthy wexford castle bridge cornerboys motorcars phonelines poolephotographiccollection leinster ireland kelly kellysmedicalhall medicalhall dogs bicycles johndowling meat butches victualler buttle buttlesbarleyfedmeatco wmartin pork veal sausages puddings fish wi1047 20thcentury

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  • profile

    Foxglove

    • 09/Jul/2020 08:48:28

    yes there is a dog

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    Foxglove

    • 09/Jul/2020 08:50:44

    and it's an identifiable breed, this looks like a setter; edit, (thanks George Fitzpatrick) its a springer spaniel

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    Foxglove

    • 09/Jul/2020 08:53:24

    the men sitting on the bridge brings to mind the series of "lunch a top the skyscrapers" in 1930s new york

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    DannyM8

    • 09/Jul/2020 08:54:12

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ I saw it First!!!

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    Foxglove

    • 09/Jul/2020 08:57:35

    danny, sometimes the finger is mightier than the .... I just love to see that a man can feel comfortable parking himself and wheelbarrow in the road for a chat with the (fantastic description that my dad also used) ... cornerboys

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    abandoned railways

    • 09/Jul/2020 09:01:58

    Car registrations. Waterford City: WI WI 1 to WI 9999 (Jan 1904 – Jan 1966). WI 1047 looks parked. Is it the photographers. www.google.ie/maps/@52.5025535,-6.5656419,3a,60y,219.98h,...

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    derangedlemur

    • 09/Jul/2020 09:08:31

    Ah, Enniscorthy. I once saw a fellow catch an eel off that bridge, I first had chicken and chips on an oval plate in the Bridge Restaurant on the corner, and I trod on a plank with a nail in it that went right through my foot while trying to catch a kitten in a barn just up the road. Now don't even drive through on my way to the ferry any more.

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    O Mac

    • 09/Jul/2020 09:09:48

    I like the two stacks of binder twine...most important use being to keep trousers up.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 09/Jul/2020 09:27:27

    No horse apples!

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    John Spooner

    • 09/Jul/2020 09:31:25

    There was an auctioneer and valuer named John Dowling** in Enniscorthy, advertising a furniture sale at Aughrim on 25th September (Fair Day)* , in the Wicklow People - Saturday 14 September 1929. He may or may not be the same John Dowling of Enniscorthy who owned the greyhounds Doctor Dolittle (New Ross Standard - Friday 26 October 1934) and the disappointing favourite Kanter's Double (New Ross Standard - Friday 29 June 1928) * "At One o'clock (New Time)" ** but he wouldn't be selling cocoa, unless one or other was a sideline

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    DannyM8

    • 09/Jul/2020 09:32:56

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ I did see it first, but I forgot to press enter!!

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 09/Jul/2020 09:41:38

    *NERD ALERT* WI 1047 could well have belonged to Mr Poole. Here is is again, parked on the bridge without a driver (duh!) - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000594489 And also here - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000594488

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    cargeofg

    • 09/Jul/2020 09:46:57

    catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000594488 Reverse view for your Convenience. WI 1047 also in shot parked with no driver

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    Foxglove

    • 09/Jul/2020 09:49:15

    this begs the question, what kind of **model** is the car ha!!

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    cargeofg

    • 09/Jul/2020 09:55:21

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/foxglove https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] English Springer Spanial.

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    cargeofg

    • 09/Jul/2020 10:03:56

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/foxglove Looks like a Ford Model A

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 09/Jul/2020 10:17:17

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ That reverse view shows a Morris bullnose which was made between 1919 and 1926.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 09/Jul/2020 10:24:28

    per the archive, this shot was commissioned by the British Reinforced Concrete Engineering Company, the modern BRC, incorporated in 1920.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 09/Jul/2020 10:32:49

    Did BRC do work on the bridge or Castle, I wonder?

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    derangedlemur

    • 09/Jul/2020 10:36:37

    The road surface looks like concrete. Maybe they were proud of it. I wonder was it them who put him on to the British Portland Cement Association? www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/28019114532

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    John Spooner

    • 09/Jul/2020 10:37:09

    Available from Kelly's Medical Hall on the other side of the river (Enniscorthy Guardian - Saturday 26 May 1917). Not much use to me I'm afraid. Enniscorthy Guardian - Saturday 26 May 1917

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    Niall McAuley

    • 09/Jul/2020 10:45:46

    Lady in a cloche hat at right suggests late 1920s to 1930s

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    Niall McAuley

    • 09/Jul/2020 10:48:32

    The butcher brags about his Frigidaire, brand dates from 1919

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 09/Jul/2020 10:55:10

    That reverse view also includes a spectacularly ugly metal pissoir, about where this sign now is (for www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ !) - goo.gl/maps/Rj11xzDCHWSPVZ2N6

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    cargeofg

    • 09/Jul/2020 10:59:59

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia As I said above for your convenience. Did not tag you last time as I could not remember who was the person who spotted these.

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    cargeofg

    • 09/Jul/2020 11:08:27

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Bullnose looks a little work worn with slightly bent offside wing.Ford Model A 4.8m produced in different styles inc pick up/ Flatbed 1927-31. Replacement for Model T. One of the signs on the post is an AA one.

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    derangedlemur

    • 09/Jul/2020 11:54:30

    Anyone know what the half beer sign in the reverse is advertising?

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    John Spooner

    • 09/Jul/2020 12:03:22

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Frigidaire seems to have appeared on this side of the Atlantic in about 1925: "A refrigerator without ice is a novelty in domestic hygiene which is rapidly coming into favour in this country. This machine, which is known as a Frigidaire, runs of the ordinary electric-light circuit" (Westminster Gazette - Tuesday 23 June 1925)

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    suckindeesel

    • 09/Jul/2020 12:04:42

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] looks like a sign for Pratts High Test, catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000594488 , is it dateable?

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    derangedlemur

    • 09/Jul/2020 12:39:56

    Pratts Hight Test Sealed 1896 Began marketing Pratt's motor spirit. Later introduced Taxibus, Valor and Royal Daylight Lamp Oil. 1899 introduced the use of sealed two-gallon cans for petrol distribution. Through its commercial policy and by the acquisition of competitors the company achieved a dominant position 1935 Anglo-American Oil Co replaced the brand name Pratt's by Esso, to align with other products such as Essolube, Essolene, etc Doesn't tell us a huge amount.

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    derangedlemur

    • 09/Jul/2020 12:42:17

    Going by the advertisements, High Test may have appeared in 1929. www.gracesguide.co.uk/Anglo-American_Oil_Co Edit: None of the memorabilia being hawked online seems any earlier than 1929.

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    Foxglove

    • 09/Jul/2020 12:58:23

    oh earlier, I was really just joking that if the car was repeatedly in Poole photos maybe it was his "model" .....T 🐐

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    O Mac

    • 09/Jul/2020 12:58:50

    The steel electricity pole seen in the other views would appear to be of a type commonly used by the ESB.. ( similar one outside my house today which can be seen in photo I have from 1932 when houses being built..Galway) If ESB then I'd suggest photo is post 1927.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 09/Jul/2020 13:10:53

    Aha! Via Trove - Before July 1928 ... "England's[sic] Longest Concrete Road Opened The Enniscorthy - Wexford Road, which is the longest stretch of all-concrete road in the British Isles, being 11 1/4 miles long, was opened by the Irish Free State Minister of Local Government." From - nla.gov.au/nla.obj-344037772/view?sectionId=nla.obj-34746... Local newspapers should have much more detail of this important event...

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 09/Jul/2020 13:23:13

    The first concrete road in Ireland in 1927 in Cork - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carrigrohane_Straight#Surface

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    John Spooner

    • 09/Jul/2020 13:28:56

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Concrete roads: The Wexford - Enniscorthy road (11½ miles) was stated to be "the largest stretch of all-concrete road in the British Isles" . The tone of the article was that concrete roads were the future. (The Sketch - Wednesday 27 June 1928). Would that include this bit? Rebuilding the road using concrete was being proposed in early 1927 (New Ross Standard). Something to show off to prospective clients (if you ignore the 29 cracks reported on it in January 1928).

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 09/Jul/2020 13:37:23

    British Reinforced Concrete also built this concrete road bridge nearby in 1915 - books.google.com.au/books?id=nfTy6VSUDqMC&pg=PA122&am... Streetview - goo.gl/maps/a5Bpzdsf4DDs66a37

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    John Spooner

    • 09/Jul/2020 13:52:04

    8th August 1930 - proposals were being discussed at a meeting of Enniscorthy Urban Council to resurface numerous streets with "6-inch slab" including Island Road, Bridge and Shannon Quay and parts of Templeshannon. (New Ross Standard - Friday 08 August 1930)

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    derangedlemur

    • 09/Jul/2020 14:18:39

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Surely after 1928 if this is the road in question?

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    cargeofg

    • 09/Jul/2020 14:43:30

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Just back and saw all this work done re Pratt's sign in reverse view. I will see if I can add anything.

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    John Spooner

    • 09/Jul/2020 14:52:30

    If the photo is dated after November 1928, the photographer was not A H Poole, but probably one of his children.

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    cargeofg

    • 09/Jul/2020 14:59:09

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I would go along with 1929/30 Found a can dated as 1930 Pratts also produced a collection of road maps for the British Isles with High Test on them. These seem to be well documented and dated. They were printed by A E Taylor. First edition ones are about 1930/31 and there is one dated 1931 of Scotland in The National Library of Scotland. https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]

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    cargeofg

    • 09/Jul/2020 14:59:47

    maps.nls.uk/scotland/rec/6043 Link to Pratt's High Test Petrol road map of Scotland. Dated 1931

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 09/Jul/2020 15:47:22

    the lady's hat suggests the 1920s, very far right of the image

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    suckindeesel

    • 09/Jul/2020 16:27:56

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Could be a Red Setter there behind the bailing twine.

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    suckindeesel

    • 09/Jul/2020 16:32:28

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] That's some quirky map, I wonder how many early motorists would have toured Scotland using that map, not many I suspect.

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    rpgvlwqt88

    • 09/Jul/2020 17:01:03

    Additionally the number plate of the truck is ZI6167

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    rpgvlwqt88

    • 09/Jul/2020 17:09:45

    Dáil Éireann debate - Wednesday, 19 Oct 1988 Deputy Ivan Yates gave me notice of his intention to raise on the Adjournment the subject matter of the loss of some 30 jobs at Buttles bacon factory, Enniscorthy, County Wexford. The Deputy has some 20 minutes to make his case and the Minister of State has some ten minutes to reply. [www.oireachtas.ie/en/debates/debate/dail/1988-10-19/18/]

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    suckindeesel

    • 09/Jul/2020 17:29:50

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Grace gives 1928 for 'ethyl " , I.e. leaded petrol, Grace doesn't mention 'High Test' which was also marketed by Pratts. I suppose a leaded fuel could be described as High Test, an Americanism. But they advertised both types. [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] The earliest High Test map I could find was published 1930. Here's an Ireland map www.ideararemaps.com/en/prodotto/pratts-high-test-plan-of...

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    suckindeesel

    • 09/Jul/2020 17:44:02

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Frigidaire, the company who introduced the use of CFCs in fridges.

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    suckindeesel

    • 09/Jul/2020 19:50:02

    Here's a start date anyway: Nov 1929 for Buttles Barley Fed Bacon Co. app.duedil.com/company/ie/7942/buttle-s-barley-fed-bacon-... which is on the right of picture. C. 1930 seems about right. Edit, site quoted above say incorporated 1929. NIAH www.buildingsofireland.ie/buildings-search/building/15603... says established 1869. So, not so conclusive. NIAH says photographed by Eason and Son and A.H. Poole. Is that plausible?

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    suckindeesel

    • 09/Jul/2020 20:04:42

    An ad for Pratts/Esso High Test and Ethyl, Motorsport magazine 1935 www.motorsportmagazine.com/archive/article/may-1935/15/pr... So, they sold both High Test and Ethyl , must be a date for the introduction of the High Test

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    suckindeesel

    • 09/Jul/2020 21:32:20

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] This looks like that sign autohistorysigns.co.uk/product/pratts-high-test-enamel-si...

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    cargeofg

    • 10/Jul/2020 09:10:39

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I had found a map of the West Country also dated 1930 but link came across in plain text only. NLS worked better. A touch of the J R R Tolkien type of mapping by A E Taylor methinks. Highly collectable now going by prices on ABE Books. I had found a Pratt's High Test sign but it seemed to be square. It was from a US auction house website and only a thumbnail image. https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Grocery shop that my Dad was manager of had a Mini estate and you could fold down the back seat. It was used for delivering boxes of groceries to customers. All the major food retailers in Ireland and UK are doing nothing new.

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    suckindeesel

    • 10/Jul/2020 11:05:45

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] That sign was unusual, according to the site, in having a red not white background. Described as "1930s"

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    Foxglove

    • 11/Jul/2020 14:34:53

    Kelly Medical Hall www.buildingsofireland.ie/buildings-search/building/15603...