Poor old Papin had indigestion...

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Poor old Papin had indigestion so he worked out a way to solve the problem! Apply some heat, create some pressure, and “Hey presto” problem solved?? Well, it’s as good a way to start the week as any. What was Mr. Papin’s digester for, and did it solve his problem?

Collection: Mason Photographic Collection

Date: 1890 - 1910

NLI Ref: M23/56/7

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 7694
thomasholmesmason thomasmayne thomashmasonsonslimited lanternslides nationallibraryofireland papinsdigester engineersdrawing pressurechamber heat papin

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 06/Jul/2020 07:54:41

    *burp*

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    Foxglove

    • 06/Jul/2020 08:24:38

    there is a protein in the juice of papaya, named and sold as 'Papain', it has a "digester" role

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    suckindeesel

    • 06/Jul/2020 08:30:04

    Here's a modern reconstruction www.scienceandsociety.co.uk/results.asp?image=10182360&am...

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 06/Jul/2020 08:47:13

    Flickr is sometimes close! Via [https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/] from a 1878 book 'The Growth of the Steam Engine' by Robert Thurston - archive.org/stream/cu31924031167632/cu31924031167632#page... [https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/14803630533/]

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 06/Jul/2020 08:49:44

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Not quite what I was thinking but along the same lines;-)

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    John Spooner

    • 06/Jul/2020 09:48:18

    From The Daily Telegraph 30 September 1893, about a dinner attended by members of the Royal Society

    Soon after their first incorporation by charter, the convivial members of the society determined to make gastronomy subservient to the purposes of science. In 1682, at a supper where several doctors and philosophers were present, everything was dressed, fish, fowl, and flesh, in Papan's sic Digester, then newly invented, and the sages ate the bones of pike and the other fishes without impediment, nay, the hardest bones of beef and mutton were served as soft as cheese, and pigeons were stewed in their own juice without the addition of water. From this merry scientific meeting one of the guests sent home a glass of jelly to his wife, in order to show her that hartshorn could be turned to a nobler use than that of being sniffed by ladies when they had the "vapours".
    That raises the knotty question of what ladies were expected to sniff when they suffered an attack of the "vapours", now that hartshorn was being put to an (unspecified) nobler use? NB the article actually (mis)spells it Papan's. I wouldn't have found it if I could type properly.

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    John Spooner

    • 06/Jul/2020 10:57:28

    A figurative Papine's sic digester. From a lively and frank exchange of views carried out in the letter columns of the Brighton Patriot, this on Tuesday 23 May 1837. Written by someone signing himself "Vindex", it concerns remarks a Mr Horne had made ("marrowless bones") about his criticism of Mr Horne's works.

    Does Mr Horne know the culinary vessel called a Papine's digester? It is a vessel which has the power of extracting good nutriment from marrowless bones. It would be well for Mr. Horne if he could convert his dull noddle into a Papine's digester, and from the marrowless bones of my criticism extract a few lessons for his future literary attempts.

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    suckindeesel

    • 06/Jul/2020 11:32:49

    Looks like an illustration from L'Eau, by G. Tissandier, Hachette, Paris, 1873 PS, Not, as I first thought, an illustration archive.org/details/bub_gb_EWo8EsfZshgC/page/n209/mode/2up from L'Eau, but probably a copy in a later English language scientific publication. He was an early pioneer in steam power, and incorporated a pressure relief valve in his 'Marmite de Papin' an invention which saved many, but not all, steam boilers from exploding. His later papers were released by the Royal Society without payment or permission. Newcomen probably based some of his early steam designs on Papin's work. He died a pauper, fulfilling the heading 'Poor old Papin' His statue in Blois in France goo.gl/maps/K9xLCs7DndQQHaht9

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 06/Jul/2020 11:54:29

    Pressure cooker? I thought it was a metal working furnace thing.

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    John Spooner

    • 06/Jul/2020 12:14:07

    The 'nobler use' for hartshorn jelly produced by Pipin's invention referred to in the Daily Telegraph article above is explained by a line in the wikipedia entry for hartshorn:

    "Hartshorn jelly or a decoction of burnt hartshorn in water was used to treat diarrhea."
    instead of its use for the vapours
    "Salt of hartshorn refers to ammonium carbonate, an early form of smelling salts obtained by dry distillation of oil of hartshorn."
    and so back to human the digestion system, but the other end from https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia 's burp.

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    cargeofg

    • 06/Jul/2020 12:21:36

    blackcountryhistory.org/collections/getrecord/WASMG_WASMG... A "modern" one for your bacon cabbage and spuds.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 06/Jul/2020 12:27:46

    Can anyone read the engraver/illustrator's signature (see note)? À la .... ??

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    derangedlemur

    • 06/Jul/2020 12:58:05

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] It is a pressure cooker, and it looks from the length of the release valve lever as though it operates at a significantly higher pressure than a modern one, unless there isn't a great fit on it. I wonder how often they blew up.

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    derangedlemur

    • 06/Jul/2020 13:04:40

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia It seems there are dictionaries of engravers' marks, but they don't seem to be available online (or not without putting in more effort than I can be bothered with).

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    derangedlemur

    • 06/Jul/2020 13:07:26

    Here's an interesting treatise on how hard done by engravers were for recognition: www.nms.ac.uk/collections-research/our-research/highlight...

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 06/Jul/2020 21:47:51

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Fascinating!

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    Dr. Ilia

    • 08/Jul/2020 08:00:05

    Wonderful details!