The DOG, the DONKEY, and the HORSE.

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Where: Connaught, County Roscommon, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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For our second offering on this momentous day when the National Library of Ireland reopens, we have this lovely image from the Eason Collection of Main Street, Roscommon!

Photographer: Unknown

Collection: Eason Photographic Collection

Date: between 1900-1920

NLI Ref: EAS_3360

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 8850
eason easonson easoncollection easonphotographiccollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland mainstreet roscommon coroscommon dog donkeycart horses carts 20thcentury

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  • profile

    Foxglove

    • 29/Jun/2020 09:02:51

    not just a dog, it's a greyhound. recognised breed ! rather than the wee scruffies that sometimes appear. I hope you all have a quiet day and that the buildings are not overrun with desperate parents looking for a form of state assisted childcare

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 29/Jun/2020 09:02:53

    CORK RIOT on the newspaper poster?

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 29/Jun/2020 09:24:48

    Spot the differences! Mr French / Lawrence was there earlier (and higher). There is an obelisk memorial (see note) which was shiny and new in Mr French's photos; hardly visible here. catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000332551 catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000332552 EDIT: Deja vu! [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/7689744950/]

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 29/Jun/2020 09:38:15

    Streetview 2011 - by 2017 those wonderful bay windows on the left are gone - goo.gl/maps/Sv5ajLBieTfUhuji7

  • profile

    Guerilla Photography (Ireland)

    • 29/Jun/2020 09:43:56

    Awesome, really like how he got the attention of nearly everything on the street including the Dog and the Donkey.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 29/Jun/2020 10:22:00

    *Geek alert* - the Lawrence photo of the new monument to Luke Hayden (died 1897, monument c. 1900) has a poster behind for the dedication of the Sacred Heart Church - Thursday 25 June 1903. So the two Lawrence photos are June 1903, and this Eason photo is well after 1903. Guessed that anyway, but there is not yet any sign of electric lamps or telephone poles ...

  • profile

    cargeofg

    • 29/Jun/2020 10:39:47

    Shell petrol symbol which is one of the most widely recognized symbols in the world. In 1904 it was the shell(black and white) within a black square. It was changed in 1909 to just the shell (black and white) on a plain background and remained in that form till 1930. The shell was then coloured yellow.

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 29/Jun/2020 10:46:08

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia I'm finding multiple riots in Cork over the time period in newspapers, so I think it mightn't help that much.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 29/Jun/2020 11:16:50

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia I was about to say, we've seen this corner house before, but I see I'm a bit late to the party.

  • profile

    nlpnt

    • 29/Jun/2020 13:19:21

    The man with the crutch is using it on the same side as the leg he's keeping elevated, the opposite of present medical advice and the same way Freddy Freeman was depicted as doing in the original Fawcett Captain Marvel (Shazam) comics from the 1940s.

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 29/Jun/2020 17:41:46

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Petrol stations didn't appear until well into the 1920s

  • profile

    cargeofg

    • 29/Jun/2020 17:46:59

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Petrol was all in 2 gallon cans and came four to a wood crate up till then. Pratts did use horse drawn bulk tankers to refuel British Army trucks in England in WW1.

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 29/Jun/2020 19:58:15

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] I think 2-gals was the maximum permitted size of spare can that could be carried in a car, this from the times before the advent of petrol stations. This www.petroliana.co.uk/View.asp?ID=3237 matches your Shell sign, seller gives a date of '1910s'

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 29/Jun/2020 20:00:11

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet An unruly bunch of rebels down there.

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 29/Jun/2020 20:07:11

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] A history of how we changed over from the chemist or bike shop to the petrol station. www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/motors/how-petrol-went-...

  • profile

    cargeofg

    • 30/Jun/2020 08:53:01

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] If you go to Shells website it gives you all the shell logos and dates.

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 30/Jun/2020 11:22:54

    Not many dating clues in this photo: Indo and Freemans gives a range of 1905-1922 The Shell logo was used from 1909 So, 1909-1920 At least that knocks a decade off the original date range

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 30/Jun/2020 21:37:54

    The last building on the left is the original BOI branch, see catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000332550 for a better view, before they moved to the old courthouse. I think I can just make out their name above the windows in our photo. Does anybody know when they moved across the road? PS. The 1911 census shows that original bank is still there, cutting a further 2 years off range 1911 - 1920

  • profile

    Dr. Ilia

    • 01/Jul/2020 08:00:07

    Wonderful Capture!!!

  • profile

    Frank Fullard

    • 15/Jul/2020 02:41:07

    The building at the end of the street was, in my youth, known as The Harrison Hall, but it had a long history before that. It was formerly a Sessions House of the 17th Century, remodelled by the Architect George Ensor in 1792 into a combined Courthouse and Market House at a cost of £1,200. Markets under sheltered arcades were held there until 1836 at which stage it was purchased for use as a Catholic Church by Parish Priest, Fr. Madden. The arcades were built up, the entrance front was expanded with tower, belfry and cupola being added. The porch and cupola were erected to the design of J. O’Farrell of Roscommon by Fr. Madden in 1844. During the time Very Rev. Dr. Phillips (who died in 1893) was Parish Priests. He erected the Conference Room and Sacristy, to a design by Mr. Goldie of London. Dr. Phillips was Parish Priest in Roscommon for almost forty years. When a new Church was built and opened in 1903, the building was eventually chosen as a Hall to commemorate the life and times of a famous Physician in Roscommon Dr. John Harrison. He died in 1891 and after his death money was raised to remember him appropriately. The suggestion was made that the former church become a community hall and be named after him. However the trustees could not agree on the matter at the time until a new group of trustees were appointed and eventually the Harrison Hall became a reality in 1912. It was subsequently used for a variety of purposes - various uses as a theatre, dancehall, cinema and billiard hall, the latter as a CYMS. I remember being in school plays and operas there in the late 1950’s! It eventually became rundown and was sold to the Bank of Ireland in the mid 1970’s. It was opened for business in 1980 and is still used as a bank. The building with the bay windows was Greallys Hotel. The Greally family have had a hotel in Roscommon for a number of generations and still run The Abbey Hotel there.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 15/Jul/2020 08:04:58

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/frankfullard Thanks Frank, we never knew you were a "Rossie"!

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 07/Apr/2021 11:39:38

    On the Cork Riot Independent poster, I think I see the word Roosevelt On the Freeman poster, the top headline could be xxx TRAGEDY I am liking June 1910 for that combo.