Well that bates Banagher

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Where: Leinster, County Offaly, Ireland

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When: 29 November 1962

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Turning C 209 in Banagher, Co. Offaly is the title of this O'Dea image from 1962. Living near a railway yard as a child, I often watched the turning of the old steam engines on the turntable and enjoyed the sight of the mighty engine being handled like a baby. In this case it is a diesel engine which is a bit unusual in my experience, as they had cabs at either end? I look forward to being corrected.

Thank you all for the contributions to the streets of Athenry on Friday. It was fascinating to watch!

Photographer: James P. O'Dea

Collection:James P. O'Dea

Date: November 29 1962

NLI Ref.: ODEA 34/62

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie


Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 9146
jamespo’dea o’deaphotographiccollection nationallibraryofireland banagher cooffaly corasiompairéireann cie dieselengine c209 november 1962 1960s offaly leinster trains railways railroads thursday 20thcentury

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  • profile

    Foxglove

    • 08/Jun/2020 08:00:23

    I hope diesel c209 finds a friend to drag / push ! the image just oozes despair; it's like " the scream" on tracks, and even they could just go round and round for eternity

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 08/Jun/2020 08:18:23

    Yikes! The trees have grown ... goo.gl/maps/PaQEQgzWqb9PvHB69 Ed. It is a "Fairy Garden" now. Magic! goo.gl/maps/LeUFQd3we7EcBgtWA

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    metrovick

    • 08/Jun/2020 08:28:26

    Could be a defect in one cab or perhaps its just accessing the shed via the turntable.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 08/Jun/2020 08:52:42

    Mr O'Dea's reverse view shows the layout of the tracks and station - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000303201

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    derangedlemur

    • 08/Jun/2020 08:59:59

    There's still a turntable there, anyway: goo.gl/maps/MoqvqzHWfXRC3tYV8

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    Oretani Wildlife (Mike Grimes)

    • 08/Jun/2020 09:20:11

    Ballina 1963 rcts.zenfolio.com/diesel/irish-railways-cie/c/hA105FC43#h... And in Cork www.google.es/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.boards.i...

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    DannyM8

    • 08/Jun/2020 09:31:37

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ :-)

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 08/Jun/2020 09:43:08

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] You are right; my streetview needs a nudge 50 metres north. Not so big a deal when I am 17,156 km distant. Can never remember how to link to Geohive maps ...

  • profile

    cargeofg

    • 08/Jun/2020 09:48:38

    bit.ly/3h322fv OSI 25 Link. I use to hear those diesels (mid 60s) late at night in Mullingar as they would leave them running when stopped in the station. Later on in the the late 70s the train for the Asahi Chemical Plant in Killala also would stop and you would see the line of tankers over the bridge on the Lynn Rd.

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    suckindeesel

    • 08/Jun/2020 10:08:09

    Turntables were really used for turning steam engines, as the later British diesel locos were equipped with two driving cabs. The exception were those single cab American ones that we saw, courtesy of Mr. O'Dea, being unloaded at the North Wall. The trick to using the turntable was balance, the loco being centred over the central pivot The appearance of Mr O'Dea on site must have been like the sighting of an albatross to a sailor. The whole place closed a month later. At that point it only handled goods, passenger traffic had ended in 1947. The loco didn't survive either, not being one of the handful that were preserved. bit.ly/3eVdB6y

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 08/Jun/2020 10:56:17

    Nearly forgot ... 29 November 1962 was a Thursday.

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    John Spooner

    • 08/Jun/2020 11:11:03

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Some boys in 1907 were ahead of their time, using a railway turntable as a playground ride. From an account of a court case in Weekly Irish Times - Saturday 09 March 1907. It isn't clear where this took place.

    In order to gain access to the ground the boys had to go through an opening in the fence, which separated the public road from the railway company's premises. The children got on to the turn-table to have "a jaunt," as they called it. The bolt by which the turn-table was kept in position was capable of being displaced with very little pressure. The boys got on the turn-table and three bigger boys, who had not been identified, set the table in motion.
    It didn't end well - a small boy got his leg crushed so badly between the turntable and a wall that it had to be amputated the next day.

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 08/Jun/2020 11:33:36

    Likely just a photo op if the station closed a month later. This one is gone, the turntable in the Edenderry Railway Station is still there

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 08/Jun/2020 11:37:00

    Banagher was an important stop for the fairs til the station closed, then farmers had to truck their livestock. books.google.ca/books?id=NZTlWNxo7q0C&lpg=PA46&ot...

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    DannyM8

    • 08/Jun/2020 11:43:38

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ poor lad!!

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    suckindeesel

    • 08/Jun/2020 16:08:42

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner They should be secured by padlock, the key usually held in the signal cabin. However, Health and Safety wasn't a thing back in 1907.

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    suckindeesel

    • 08/Jun/2020 16:17:39

    At least most of the houses in the background have survived goo.gl/maps/ddQSUoV16DA9tfin9 Banagher was an important place a century before this photo. It was a crossing point over the Shannon and supported a distillery, two breweries and a flourishing corn trade. The Corn Laws put paid to that though. It probably had a population of over 3,000 in the early 19th century, falling to less than half that later on. The railway station was the terminus of the 27-mile GS&W branch line from Clara. The tracks were still there, at least near Shannonbridge, in the late 60s when I came down on the canal.

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    cargeofg

    • 08/Jun/2020 17:38:26

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia What I have done is to book mark the link from an older photo on NLI and then travel around Ireland to what ever location you need then copy link over on the share menu.

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    suckindeesel

    • 08/Jun/2020 20:38:51

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia G603 in lower photo was an earlier version of the G611 class that we had earlier https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/49885255393/in/dateposted/

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 08/Jun/2020 21:30:59

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Thank you! https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Thank you!

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    suckindeesel

    • 08/Jun/2020 21:44:25

    This loco type was intended for branch line operation and became almost redundant following the Andrews Report which recommended the closure of many such lines. However, they got a second lease of life following re-engining with EMD engines which doubled their horsepower. They then served the Dublin suburban service (Howth to Greystones) until being replaced by the new DART. A small number were sold on to NIR. All were eventually scrapped, except for three.

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    O Mac

    • 09/Jun/2020 07:49:10

    Banagher goods at Clara taken same day. 29/11/62 catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000306549/MooviewerImg?mobile...

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    cargeofg

    • 09/Jun/2020 09:41:47

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] There are quite a few photos of Banagher and O'Dea was there in the late 50s.

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    Salty Windows

    • 09/Jun/2020 10:18:06

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] A tantilising clue as to how the turntable worked! Once loco was balanced what happened then? When I look at the turntable in Connolly I could only imagine a stick of dynamite getting it to move.

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    suckindeesel

    • 09/Jun/2020 13:08:10

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gerrydunne Depends on which of the two turntables in Connolly you mean. The smaller 45ft one looks like it hasn't moved in years and might not even be connected to the system anymore, but the 55ft one at the Shed is still used. This one is unusual in being designed for vacuum powered operation. The loco supplied the vacuum to a vacuum motor which turned the table. However, this feature hasn't worked in many a long day. The turntable consists of a 'bridge' carrying the rails supported by a well greased central pivot. Each end runs on wheels on a circular rail in the bottom of the pit. As long as the loco is centered properly the weight is mainly carried by the pivot. Two men can rotate it easily enough.

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    Eiretrains

    • 09/Jun/2020 23:50:27

    The reason why locomotive C209 is being turned (probably only slightly though!) on the turntable is that Banagher was one of those station termini in Ireland where the line ended literally at the turntable itself; in order for any locomotive to move to the opposite end of the train having arrived at the station platform, it had to move onto the turntable to gain access onto the other connecting track, which it has just done in that picture of O'Dea's, It's unlikely C209 would not have been rotated fully, the table was simply nudged to the other track, as the locomotive had cabs at either end as you say - Hope this lenghty, if not mundane, explanation clears things up! Incidentally, Harcourt Street station is one of the more well known station's where the line ended in a turntable.

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    jamica1

    • 14/Jun/2020 00:16:22

    Nice item

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    suckindeesel

    • 24/Jun/2020 17:12:05

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] could this be ODEA 103/10 ? Edit, apparently not, but still curious about the O'Dea [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/12618389704/in/[email protected]/] I know it's off topic but this, via www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ could be the same little train at the other end of its journey.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 24/Jun/2020 21:42:00

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Unlike Mr O'Dea, I have no idea. Oh dear!

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    suckindeesel

    • 24/Jun/2020 22:01:04

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] The work of www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ as it turns out, I was convinced it was an O'Dea