Deep Sea Hydraulic Engine

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Where: Unknown

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When: 01 January 1910

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To end this week, where we have moved about the country quite a bit, we have a most unusual image from the Mason Photographic Collection. A “Deep Sea Hydraulic Engine” plan which at that time was unusual or significant enough to merit a photograph. Why did Mason have this image, and why is it so important?

Collection: Mason Photographic Collection

Date: 1890 - 1910

NLI Ref: M23/53/10

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 8045
thomasholmesmason thomasmayne thomashmasonsonslimited lanternslides nationallibraryofireland deepseahydraulicengine drawing plan outline professorjohnjoly johnjoly

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  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 08/May/2020 07:51:38

    It's possible that this is an illustration from a presentation held on January 27th 1914 by the Professor Joly at the RDS.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 08/May/2020 07:57:26

    It may also feature in this article called "On the investigation of the deep sea deposits" by Professor John Joly. If so, the hydraulic engine was used to take samples of deep sea deposits.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 08/May/2020 08:00:29

    Deep Sea Hydraulic Engine as part of the abovementioned article.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 08/May/2020 08:15:04

    Thomas Mason was apparently in the business of preparing slides for lectures (see the description of some he prepared for Sir William John Thompson for example.) He would probably have been responsible for photographing the engineering drawing for use in Prof. Joly's presentation and that's why it is present in the collection, rather than being of any particular importance itself. (Assuming you're not interested in the history of deep sea deposit sampling.)

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 08/May/2020 08:21:55

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet Flickroonies are always interested! Especially in deep sea deposits:-)

  • profile

    Foxglove

    • 08/May/2020 08:31:03

    i am digging deep to dredge up a witty comment

  • profile

    Foxglove

    • 08/May/2020 08:31:31

    or even a jolly one

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 08/May/2020 08:33:45

    Bottom feeder!

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    Carol Maddock

    • 08/May/2020 08:46:55

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet] I presume John Joly is a rellie of our Jaspar Robert Joly, donor of some of Library Towers' most precious collections?

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    sharon.corbet

    • 08/May/2020 08:55:43

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Nephew, I think. His potted biography above mentions "Henry Edward, the fourth child, 1784-1852, married Martha Revelle. John Plunket Joly (1826-1858) was their son." (John Plunket was his father. ) Whereas the Cambridge Dictionary of Irish Biography says this about Jaspar Robert Joly: "Joly, Jaspar Robert (1819–92), book collector, was born at Hollywood House, Brackagh, Clonbulloge, King's Co. (Offaly), on 26 May 1819, the eldest of three sons of Henry Edward Joly (1784–1852), a clergyman, and his wife Martha, daughter of Robert Revelle of Hartwill, Co. Wicklow."

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 08/May/2020 09:00:57

    Wikipedia article. It also links to a nice article about him.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 08/May/2020 09:03:10

    Some of his photos are also on the NLI, for example this one: https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/48371068177/

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    O Mac

    • 08/May/2020 09:10:08

    To have "Deep Sea Hydraulic Engine" written on the drawing is really overstating the obvious.....!!.

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    DannyM8

    • 08/May/2020 09:20:56

    it surprised me that the scale measurement is Metric rather than Imperial!

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    Niall McAuley

    • 08/May/2020 09:33:29

    John Joly in the 1911 census, living on Temple Road, a professor of geology.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 08/May/2020 09:46:30

    Here is Hollywood House of 1810 at the NIAH.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 08/May/2020 10:00:21

    [aside] Via Trove, "Clothes and the Swimmer", Professor Joly's 1916 advice and explanation, which must have been particularly useful for shipwrecked sailors during WW1 - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/212931290

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    cargeofg

    • 08/May/2020 10:52:40

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] www.bipm.org/en/measurement-units/history-si/Maybe aimed or scripted for scientists. The drawing for manufacturing could have been in Imperial and more comprehensive. No dogs today and it is Guide Dogs Day in Ireland to day.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 08/May/2020 11:35:14

    He even wrote poetry (about a fossil), and has a crater on Mars named after him.

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    suckindeesel

    • 08/May/2020 12:47:34

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet Very moving poem, but did himself and H.G. Wells ever build this monstrous sea engine?

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    sharon.corbet

    • 08/May/2020 13:10:05

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Oh, it’s not a submarine or something like that. It’s for taking samples from the sea bed. He already had designed a way of taking the samples - but to do it you need to be able to get energy down to the bottom of the sea, which is not easy. He’s talking about 1000 fathoms (about 1800m) down. This invention is using the water pressure at 1800m (or lower) to give you the energy you need to drill into the sea bed to take samples. I haven’t read it fully to understand all the details to be honest, but it’s called a hydraulic engine because it‘s using water (or a liquid) to do work. It’s not monstrous either - based on the scale it’s less than a metre! I dunno whether it was ever actually used.

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    suckindeesel

    • 08/May/2020 14:18:38

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet Just kiddin'

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    mrrobertwade (wadey)

    • 08/May/2020 14:22:08

    Every home should have one

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    suckindeesel

    • 08/May/2020 15:24:12

    Seems to have been one of the last of the great Victorian polymaths