Many hands and social distancing

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Where: Munster, Cork, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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It's all hands on deck as the army with the help of dock workers lift an armoured car from the deck of a ship in Cork harbour to use in the ongoing Irish Civil War in the rebellious Munster.


Photographer: W. D. Hogan

Collection: Hogan Wilson Collection

Date: 1922(?) Circa 7th August 1922

NLI Ref.: HOGW 26

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 14048
hoganwilsoncollection wdhogan nationallibraryofireland cork countycork corkharbour ship crane armouredcar soldiers irishfreestate officers dockworkers peerless austin

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  • profile

    O Mac

    • 07/Apr/2020 07:48:33

    This was taken at Passage West.. The ship is the TSS Arvonia previously TSS Cambria having been renamed in 1919 en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/TSS_Cambria_(1897)

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    O Mac

    • 07/Apr/2020 07:53:59

    We came on this armoured car before. Seen at Passage around the 7th August 1922. flic.kr/p/b8SQmD

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    Foxglove

    • 07/Apr/2020 08:17:19

    it appears that there may be more "driving on planks" rather than lifting !

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    abandoned railways

    • 07/Apr/2020 08:59:50

    The crane is a Taylor & Hubbard vertical boiler steam crane. Running on the rails.

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    abandoned railways

    • 07/Apr/2020 09:04:20

    Óglaigh na hÉireann badge on the turret. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_Defence_Forces_cap_badge

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    Foxglove

    • 07/Apr/2020 09:18:26

    hi Fred, yes I see the crane cables. bit of a blind this morning !

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    John A. Coffey

    • 07/Apr/2020 09:20:25

    Old piece of sellotape top right, one of the best and worst inventions of all time.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 07/Apr/2020 10:16:09

    Flickr is sometimes amazing! In WW1 via [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nationalmediamuseum/] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nationalmediamuseum/3007981410/] I find it difficult to tell which is the front - hint - double wheels at the back! - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peerless_armoured_car

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 07/Apr/2020 10:22:03

    There is supposed to be a restored Peerless in the Curragh Army Camp. Can't find it on Flickr, so here is a similar angle hi-res photo of one in the Bovington Tank Museum, UK, via https://www.flickr.com/photos/lookupinwonder/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/lookupinwonder/8096662806/

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    suckindeesel

    • 07/Apr/2020 11:07:26

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/foxglove] Apparently too heavy for the crane, as noted in www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/6652701421/ , so rolled off when the tide levelled the deck with the quay.

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    cargeofg

    • 07/Apr/2020 11:19:33

    www.tankmuseum.org/year-news/bovnews38194 Six Tons. Note also extra number of spokes on Bovington exhibit compared to armoured car been unloaded [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/foxglove]

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    Foxglove

    • 07/Apr/2020 11:22:08

    once witnessed "how to get heifers out of an open fishing boat that at low tide was below the harbour level...." corkscrew their tails until they holler in pain and make the boat to harbour jump ... 🐂🐂🐂

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    cargeofg

    • 07/Apr/2020 11:35:18

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/abandonedrailsireland Crossley light tender? Double rolled rib on the wing.

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    Carol Maddock

    • 07/Apr/2020 11:50:58

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I think I remember one of our conservators calling it the Devil’s Tape!

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    cargeofg

    • 07/Apr/2020 12:00:08

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I was listing to the boss Dr Sandra on the radio this morning. Was away for a few hrs and get back to see all is nearly done. https://www.flickr.com/photos/abandonedrailsireland Ticked all of the boxes I would have. Not to worry plenty more photos in the vaults of Library Towers for another day.

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    Carol Maddock

    • 07/Apr/2020 12:03:27

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] AWOL, eh? You need to get up in the middle of the night to beat this lot, George. You can't blink, but they've got a whole history of something or someone written.

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    cargeofg

    • 07/Apr/2020 12:33:07

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Yes indeed you need to be up before your breakfast !

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 07/Apr/2020 13:03:51

    FISA! A fully restored 1915 Peerless lorry (sold for £42,550!!), on which these armoured cars were based (bodywork by Austin). Note the rear corner hooks. Via https://www.flickr.com/photos/rw3-497alh/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/rw3-497alh/14413706074/Front view next pic.

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    sam2cents

    • 07/Apr/2020 15:12:42

    Amazing photo! Does anyone know if armoured cars fell under the heading of weapons/munitions or vehicles? Or were they completely separate to both?

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    suckindeesel

    • 07/Apr/2020 19:42:47

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] Here's a pic of the Curragh one, forum.irishmilitaryonline.com/attachment.php?s=95ffe5b319... , apparently it's a modern reproduction built on a Peerless truck chassis by the army apprentices as the only surviving example being the Bovington one. This site has many other photos of these cars in Ireland, including other shots of the unloading. forum.irishmilitaryonline.com/showthread.php?16450-D-AUL-...

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    suckindeesel

    • 07/Apr/2020 19:43:23

    Solid rubber tyres?

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    silverio10

    • 07/Apr/2020 21:37:33

    Buenas fotos antiguas .

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 07/Apr/2020 21:42:29

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Yes, and chain drive to the rear wheels, see the green one above. Boneshaker!

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    O Mac

    • 08/Apr/2020 00:08:59

    Irish Army's replica Peerless Armoured Car on the move... youtu.be/iMOLKNIeTHw

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 08/Apr/2020 07:27:39

    This talk about the Bovington one is priceless too - "The dear old Irish discovered that if you had a long metal rod and put it through the wooden wheels, you could break the spokes and disable the vehicle ... ..."!! youtu.be/Nuc4XARvw-Y

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    Carol Maddock

    • 08/Apr/2020 08:25:25

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Do you think there might have been a touch of sarcasm there, calling us the “dear old Irish”?

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    suckindeesel

    • 08/Apr/2020 08:43:40

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Those damned Irish, they never play by the rules. Explains the difference in the spokes. My father recalled a similar technique being used against the DMP, but with wooden poles. The miners used marbles scattered on the road to upset their mounted police atttackers. Sometimes it's the simple things that work best. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peerless_armoured_car

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    cargeofg

    • 08/Apr/2020 09:20:27

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia If you did not break spokes, chain could break or come off sprocket. First princaple of marbles. Still applies to F1 cars today. All the worms of tyre rubber build up off the racing line. Car off the line goes onto the rubber marbles and exit at speed to gravel trap. If you Zoom in on Bovington photo you can also see the square U shackles on the spokes.

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    suckindeesel

    • 08/Apr/2020 12:35:50

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Hard to see the purpose of the shackles, were they fitted to strengthen the wooden spokes? I suspect that the metal wheels were an 'Irish' mod following the experience of the BA in Ireland. The marbles underfoot would upset the horses. The largest chain drive, a duplex, that I've seen was used on a 160 HP Deutz shunter. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CIE_611_Class. Never broke or derailed. In fact the Peerless reminds me of a rail vehicle in many ways and is a surprisingly crude design for a company which made v8 luxury cars for the US market.

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    cargeofg

    • 08/Apr/2020 14:41:00

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] If you look close on the shackle there is a hook on them. Only one wheel with two tyres fitted on exhibit so maybe used to clip on second wheel. Different but much the same way you would fit duals or a cage to extended studs on a tractor rim. Compared to their cars of the 30s and late 50s the armoured car is very utilitarian. But if it stops the bullets it is doing its job.

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    Dr. Ilia

    • 16/Apr/2020 08:00:09

    Beautiful

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    tfjzhpri7

    • 24/Jan/2021 11:45:41

    A Peerless coming off the Arvonia 8th August 1922 ?

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 24/Jan/2021 15:29:37

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I think you are correct about the Arvonia and Peerless, https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] suggests "around" the 7th August, I would love to hear why you go for the 8th? Mary