Constructing a wall? I think not!

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Where: Unknown

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When: 01 January 1955

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Some townie in Library Towers thought that these men were building a wall at the foot of Mount Errigal! Sure God help them they never spent a day on the bog footing turf. This really gorgeous Tynan image shows one of the real beauties of Donegal while also showing a dying art, the cutting, drying and gathering of turf (peat to the forringers among us) from the bog!

Photographers: Denis Tynan 1923 - 2010

Collection: Tynan Photographic Collection

Date: Circa 1950 - 1960

NLI Ref: NPA TYN101

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 11243
tynanphotographiccollection nationallibraryofireland ireland denistynan donegal ulster northernireland errigal mounterrigal bog footingtheturf peat fuel

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  • profile

    Swordscookie

    • 05/Mar/2020 08:39:17

    Some of Tynan's work is rather mundane but others, such as the ploughboy, are just out of this world. I love this shot!

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 05/Mar/2020 08:56:10

    Somewhere around here? ... Bogview - goo.gl/maps/ijCfDnWCVu7EdUuZ8

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    robinparkes

    • 05/Mar/2020 09:12:53

    Been there, done that. My father in law was cutting, my wife was in her bare feet in the hole tossing the turfs out and my mother in law and I were futting the turf. We were liberally doused with old perfume to keep the midges at bay. We travelled to the bog in a split screen Morris Minor.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 05/Mar/2020 09:25:21

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie] Yes, it is a wonderful composition. Quite a lot to do with the classic "Rule of Thirds" (see notes) - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rule_of_thirds

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    derangedlemur

    • 05/Mar/2020 09:28:20

    Flickr is sometimes amazing: Katsushika Hokusai - Thirty-six views of Mt Fuji: View from Umezawasa, Edo period at Tokyo National Museum Tokyo Japan

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    derangedlemur

    • 05/Mar/2020 09:31:14

    I once got sunburn up there, Strange but true. Only day since the medieval warm period that it wasn't pissing rain in Donegal.

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    maczeug2

    • 05/Mar/2020 09:34:30

     Nice find & shot ;-)

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    O Mac

    • 05/Mar/2020 09:49:40

    Who mentioned midges?

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    CASSIDY PHOTOGRAPHY

    • 05/Mar/2020 10:06:26

    This is probably one of the most beautiful images I have seen in this portfolio. www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ What century was that, Robin? You are showing your age. Hope you are well.

  • profile

    Wendy:

    • 05/Mar/2020 10:31:53

    Wonderful image - thankyou for posting

  • profile

    robinparkes

    • 05/Mar/2020 11:53:36

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/cassidyphotography 20th century, not long after we got married so it was 1979. The turf bank was in Meentycat, Donegal.

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    cargeofg

    • 05/Mar/2020 12:51:19

    As with Robin been there and done that down in County Clare on my Aunt's turf bank. Footed, dried and out to the roadside clamp and drawn home by ass and cart. Also 20th century 1968/69/70. Used to go down to her farm for all of the summer hols.

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    CASSIDY PHOTOGRAPHY

    • 05/Mar/2020 13:03:43

    www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Hope you gentlemen realise I was just takin' the piss I have not been to Ireland in many years, but I found it quaint. So, I live in the next best place, former Van Diemen's Land, a former British penal colony for Irish patriots, et al.

  • profile

    Carol Maddock

    • 05/Mar/2020 13:35:04

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Robin, as someone who's always eaten alive by insects, I'm charmed with your anti-insect remedy. I will be going to the tropics in future armed with “old perfume”!

  • profile

    cargeofg

    • 05/Mar/2020 14:00:56

    Hi Carol No need for "old perfume"... Avon Skin So Soft Lotion works well. Not sold as a midge repellent but works well as it contains citronella.

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    paulbarry9

    • 05/Mar/2020 14:04:18

    Beautiful picture of world now long gone , this could pass for moon landscape !

  • profile

    robinparkes

    • 05/Mar/2020 14:05:43

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/cassidyphotography Naturally Robert. I think I have the measure of you by now :)

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    robinparkes

    • 05/Mar/2020 14:08:11

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Carol, you use anything you can get to keep them away.

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  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 05/Mar/2020 15:04:50

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Ah, good old sieben'n'vierzig elf; It absolutely doesn't work, btw.

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 05/Mar/2020 17:38:59

    What about citronella? Have noticed it's always sold out in Spain, so somebody must believe it works. The Avon product comes highly recommended, but the Avon Lady doesn't call to the door anymore, at least in Ireland anyway. The image is timeless, could have been taken anytime, except today as no sign of any activity in the modern "bogview".

  • profile

    CASSIDY PHOTOGRAPHY

    • 06/Mar/2020 00:21:14

    I have spent considerable time flying in Africa and seven months in Papua New Guinea, I found the best defence against mossies was using OFF - Tropical Strength and drinking lots of Schweppes Tonic Water containing quinine. Or, maybe I was immune to malaria.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 06/Mar/2020 07:29:45

    Call me newfangled if you will, but personally, I went with DEET and Malarone.

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    derekjmott

    • 06/Mar/2020 11:57:25

    To my best understanding this is not "traditional" turf saving. The activity in progress appears to be the footing of machine cut "sausage" turf which is notably longer and thinner than the traditional sod cut by the mighty men with the traditional hand tool. It is often sold by the "floor" (22yd if I remember). Unlike traditional sods these will likely not likely need to be clamped before gathering (Unless needed to protect them from becoming over dried and crumbling).

  • profile

    Carol Maddock

    • 06/Mar/2020 13:57:37

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Have tried everything to not much avail, but at least https://www.flickr.com/photos/cassidyphotography's suggestion allows me to drink lots of gin with the tonic water!

  • profile

    CASSIDY PHOTOGRAPHY

    • 07/Mar/2020 00:43:04

    www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Judging by the uniformity of the shape and size of the turf, it appears to be machine made, versus by man on the end of a spade. I suppose the machine is somewhere out of the picture, but to give it context, it would have made great historical context to include it to show "industry of the day" . . . For a great scenic landscape shot, Tynan should have sidestepped the men and turf, just to capture the beautiful mountain and its foreground. I see this photo as a Photographer, and how I would approach the same subject.

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    Swordscookie

    • 09/Mar/2020 08:11:18

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/cassidyphotography Sorry to say, from my point of view, you would be missing the wood for the trees! The whole beauty of that shot is that those men are carrying out a traditional fuel harvest in the lee of the bleak Errigal mountain. I have seen your wonderful photographs and you might, indeed you would, get a fine shot of Errigal but we will never see that scene again and Tynan has preserved it and shared it with us all! When you have a moment search Errigal on Flickr and you will see those shots that you would favour?

  • profile

    Karin Joy Passmore

    • 05/Apr/2020 19:31:58

    Reminds me of those unique Irish stone walls with rocks set vertically like books on a shelf; I've seen them in Ireland and once in a while here in Massachusetts, but it implies a wealth of flat stones!