Caging the tiger

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Where: Unknown

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When: 14 May 1979

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Is this the forerunner of the 40 foot container that is so ubiquitous today? This giant cage protecting the new item of equipment for the “GPE” factory in Donegal must have been quite the marvel in 1979. Taken when industries were opening in rural Ireland, whereas they all appear to be closing down today, sadly!

Photographers: Denis Tynan 1923 - 2010

Collection: Tynan Photographic Collection

Date: 14 May 1979

NLI Ref: NPA TYN209

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 11663
tynanphotographiccollection nationallibraryofireland ireland denistynan donegal 40foottrailer cage gpe factory 14may1979 ulster nicebeaver may 1979 1970s

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  • profile

    abandoned railways

    • 22/Jan/2020 09:02:59

    This was made at GPE, and its being delivered to the customer.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 22/Jan/2020 09:17:12

    Streetview - goo.gl/maps/mzqMVJ5LrfvkoAgL6 Someone has swiped the three stones. Edit - two stones and a cardboard box

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 22/Jan/2020 09:21:48

    What are the "tigers"? Seems they are rusting out the back - goo.gl/maps/pcBFvyC7usH7AvEW6

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 22/Jan/2020 09:34:36

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Looks like a distillation column to me. (May also be an absorber.) It will be later stood on its end (the end facing us goes downward) and used to make food or chemicals.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 22/Jan/2020 09:38:41

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet] - Scrubbers! "GPE has completed contracts in the value range between a few hundred to several million euro. Included among its many contracts in Ireland are the supply of multi-kilometres of extract ducting and process piping; shop supply of complete 4m diameter tanks; site assembly of 5m diameter tanks; complete in situ fabrication of up to 3m diameter tanks in restricted access process areas; rectangular and circular sumps, scrubbers and columns. Export contracts to end users in Austria, Britain, Germany and Poland include process pressure piping; a 30 tonne multi stage ionised wet scrubber and a 8 tonne three stage odour abatement cross flow scrubber." From - www.gpeindustries.ie/AboutUs.htm

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 22/Jan/2020 09:38:47

    GPE Industries Limited (Gaeltara Plastics Engineering) are still there in Anagry, gpeindustries.ie Won't go rusty as made of GRP. Must be a regular item if still made after all these years. Possibly fume extraction/ventilation duct, they can make em up to 3-metres diameter.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 22/Jan/2020 09:39:41

    14 May 1979 was a Monday . . .

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 22/Jan/2020 09:55:57

    Hilarious photos from the same day of The GPE Boss (?) in a new suit with photos of the Tiger on his desk - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000734108/HierarchyTree catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000734111/HierarchyTree

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 22/Jan/2020 10:00:52

    Reg LZO 336 - the earlist family car I remember was JZO 340 in the early 70s. (Have to think hard to remember my current reg!)

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    sharon.corbet

    • 22/Jan/2020 10:05:32

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia The drawings are on the desk too, so that I can make out that it is for a potash company. (Possibly Arab Potash Company / Jacobs)

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 22/Jan/2020 10:11:12

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet Well done you! I hoped it might be a new wine barrel for Heidelberg.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 22/Jan/2020 10:18:14

    Arab Potash at wikipedia. Jacobs is probably the Engineering group rather then the Kimberly, Mikado and Coconut Creme gang.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 22/Jan/2020 10:25:02

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] Yeah, Jacobs got the contract to build a potash plant in Jordan in 1977.

  • profile

    abandoned railways

    • 22/Jan/2020 10:40:59

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Is that an AEC lorry. edit - Its a Leyland Beaver (CIE Road Freight Department)

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 22/Jan/2020 10:59:39

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/abandonedrailsireland I think it might say Mercury under the right corner of the windscreen which was an AEC model name.

  • profile

    abandoned railways

    • 22/Jan/2020 11:08:12

    Flickr is amazing www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/5442691218/

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 22/Jan/2020 11:21:54

    Ah, it says Beaver then? The central logo is a better match for Leyland all right. Beaver more clearly readable in NPA TYN206 I also see the same sign in the corner of the windscreen - UNAUTHORISED PASSENGERS PROHIBITED AND NOT INSURED

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 22/Jan/2020 11:36:37

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] This lady didn't see the sign - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000734122/HierarchyTree

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 22/Jan/2020 12:29:04

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia I'm not actually sure, on looking again, whether the drawings have anything to do with the "tiger". From the title box, it looks like that they are only for a quotation. If they were following proper procedures, the drawing should not only have a date in the "as built" box, but there should be a checker and an approver filled in.

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    suckindeesel

    • 22/Jan/2020 12:52:34

    The 1979 date ties in with the construction by AP of their plant in Jordan, where potash was extracted from the Dead Sea. To quote their website history: '1979 Construction work started on the project and was completed in 1982.....'

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    suckindeesel

    • 22/Jan/2020 13:05:35

    I see an Aran trailer, from the Longmile Rd. The "tiger cage" seems constructed from timber lathes and looks unsuitable for delivery by ship to Jordan.

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 22/Jan/2020 13:45:30

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Maybe more like '68-'69, like the truck?

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 22/Jan/2020 15:06:07

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] If you mean JZO 340, we owned it the 70s, but it was not bought new.

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    suckindeesel

    • 22/Jan/2020 15:19:37

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley I actually meant your car and the Beaver, as both lie in the same reg series, AZO 001 to YZO 999 (May 1968 – Mar 1969) My first bike was reg MRI something or other, but can't even remember my current reg when buying an M50 toll in the garage.

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    suckindeesel

    • 22/Jan/2020 15:43:53

    Does that load look too big for a 40-ft. Containers must have been in use here from, say, the 60s?

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    suckindeesel

    • 22/Jan/2020 17:31:34

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/abandonedrailsireland Re the Inchicore photo, the road vehicles may well have been part of the Open Day display. This yard is behind where Broadstone moved to.

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 22/Jan/2020 20:26:32

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] with my chemical/process engineer’s [hard] hat on, I’m fairly sure that’s a column/tower of some kind (distillation or absorption) rather than a vent. The part facing us is the column skirt, with a drain in the middle. My impression is that this would be too large to transport in a 40’ container, and to be honest I’m not sure if they do that with columns. I normally deal with much larger versions (up to 100 m high) so while I know they get transported as special items I’ve never really thought smaller ones. Some of the other photos show what may be 3 vessels on one truck as well. As I mentioned earlier, the paperwork on the guy’s desk looks more like it is just a quotation, rather than as-built drawings. Now, he may have tidily collected all of the versions of the drawing together, starting with the earliest, but May 1979 does also seem a bit early to be shipping smallish columns to site. Typically you need to start with land preparation, and the largest pieces of equipment and/or steel structure before placing smaller pieces and adding piping etc. I wouldn’t be surprised if that was an unrelated drawing acting as a prop. (In which case, bold manager/engineer! You shouldn’t have client names clearly visible like that!)

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 22/Jan/2020 21:33:36

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet I bow to your superior knowledge in this matter. My guess of "vent" was more based on the item shown lying outside in the earlier street view. A different yoke entirely. The photo on the desk looks remarkably similar to Mr. Tynan's NPA TYN198, rather than our "tigers", so the whole thing may be more like studio props. Only "Quotation" box is filled in, as you say, dated ?/3/79 Title looks like "? ? transfer pipeline ?" The vessels, and other various pieces of "machinery" may be unrelated to this order, just views of what was being produced at the time. Construction of the potash plant only started in 1979, no doubt with site clearance etc., too soon to be receiving any pieces of plant. Still, it was a nice theory while it lasted.

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    nlpnt

    • 29/Jan/2020 14:17:18

    The Corolla is a 1975-79 KE30 (1200cc) or TE31 (1600cc), they gave the "big-block" models distinct hoods and grilles but it's impossible to tell them apart from the rear. Import Archive is focused on US-spec models but still a fairly good reference on old Japanese cars; importarchive.com/toyota/corolla/1975-1979/specs

  • profile

    Can Pac Swire

    • 11/Feb/2020 04:53:20

    That’s one massive equipment!

  • profile

    RETRO STU

    • 18/Feb/2020 11:07:14

    Whesso Ltd on Jamestown Road in Finglas used to make a lot of massive steel drums and tanks like that. To facilitate production, they had two large gantry cranes, one inside and an even larger one outside. Sadly, that company closed some years ago and the site is all leveled.