The first Gladesville Bridge

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Where: New South Wales, , Australia

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When: 01 January 1900

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Format: Glass plate negative.

Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication.

Repository: Phillips Glass Plate Negative Collection, Powerhouse Museum www.powerhousemuseum.com/collection/database/collection=Phillips_Glass_Plate_Negative

Part Of: Powerhouse Museum Collection

General information about the Powerhouse Museum Collection is available at www.powerhousemuseum.com/collection/database

Persistent URL: www.powerhousemuseum.com/collection/database/?irn=385882

Acquisition credit line: Gift of the Estate of Raymond W Phillips, 2008

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Owner: Powerhouse Museum Collection
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 10675
powerhousemuseum dc:identifier=httpwwwpowerhousemuseumcomcollectiondatabaseirn385882 xmlns:dc=httppurlorgdcelements11 bridge blackandwhite gladesville australia bayliss phillips stick figure 1881 huntleys point

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 22/Jun/2009 14:30:25

    More info about the various Gladesville Bridges here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gladesville_Bridge "The 1881 Gladesville Bridge was about 300 metres (980 ft) to the west of the modern bridge. This original bridge only carried one lane of traffic in each direction as well as a tramway. It featured a swing section on the southern end of the bridge that could be opened to permit sailing ships and steamers with high funnels to pass. Colliers from Newcastle would require the bridge to be opened to gain access to the Australian Gas Light Company (AGL) gasworks site at Mortlake, (now redeveloped as Breakfast Point). The bridge stood on iron cylinders with a sandstone pier at each end of the bridge. The sandstone piers are all that remain today of the original bridge." This photo must be from the northern end - the swinging section is at the other end. No sign of a tramway electrics - perhaps it was not yet built at the time of this photo (c.1895?)

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    Historically_Sympathetic

    • 30/Aug/2009 08:34:00

    Were there not steam trams before the advent of Electric trams? I know in the History of Mortlake, a tram did operate and it started off as a steam service from Mortlake to Enfield, this was an annexe service from the main city service.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 11/Jun/2010 11:59:02

    Charles Bayliss (from the other direction and called "Parramatta Bridge") - nla.gov.au/nla.pic-vn4236737

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    Natural-Heart

    • 10/Mar/2014 07:04:22

    beautiful