Williamsgate Street, Galway City, Co. Galway

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Where: Galway, Ireland

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When: 01 January 1910

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Having been to Graigue by brake and back last week we start this week in Galway looking at the makers of the beautiful Claddagh Ring on Williamsgate Street in Galway City.

Almost single-handedly, Niall McAuley was able to refine the date range for this image - from 5 decades to within a decade of c.1910/11. In doing so, lots of additional information has surfaced; on Alexander Moon's premises to the left (of Moon's Corner and Cash's/Todd's/Moon's renown), Dillon's Jewellers to the right (known for contributing the revival of the Claddagh Ring), and the various shops in the centre (all of which clearly brought much business and life to the city)....


Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Catalogue range c.1865-1914. Likely c.1905-1914.

NLI Ref: L_CAB_04223

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 19511
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio glassnegative nationallibraryofireland williamsgatest galwaycity countygalway ireland dillonjewellers claddaghring alexandermoon moons eglingtonbuildings colonialbuildings galwayroyalinstitution jewellers dillon mcdonaghs tram williamsgate eglintonbuildings lawrencephotographcollection

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  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Jan/2017 09:33:48

    Streetview

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Jan/2017 09:35:15

    The horse trams started in 1879 per wikipedia, and ran (or walked!) until 1918.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Jan/2017 09:37:59

    I see a swan necked electric light, which suggests 1905+

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Jan/2017 09:41:55

    At left is Alexander Moon's, which remained Moon's until it was absorbed by Brown Thomas.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Jan/2017 09:44:36

    According to this Kenny's bookshop page: The building dates from c.1870. It opened initially under the name Farquarson, then it became Farquarson and Moon , then Alexander Moon, then Alexander Moon Ltd. Today it trades under the name Brown Thomas, though most Galwegians still call it Moons.

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    Carol Maddock

    • 23/Jan/2017 09:52:35

    Information on the Colonial Buildings & Galway Royal Institution, 1866, from Archiseek.

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    guliolopez

    • 23/Jan/2017 10:00:46

    A great shot. Only a very small pity we can't see the "Dublin Time" clock evident in the StreetView that [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] shares. RE:

    Today it trades under the name Brown Thomas, though most Galwegians still call it Moons
    Cash's in Cork is the same. As with others in the Cash's/Todd's/Moon's group, it's also now a BT store. Some (myself included) still refer to it as Cash's. Or at least, I did until I said "Cash's" to a (younger) colleague recently, and they looked at me blankly, while another (now blacklisted) colleague scoffed at my apparent old-fashioned turn of phrase :)

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    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Jan/2017 10:35:24

    Just beyong the Colonial Buildings I see Faller written on two awnings. Fallers Jewellers are still there in the same building today. From Faller's website: In 1899, Stephen Faller, by now a successful businessman decided to move his business to a street further up the town away from the hubbub of the market area. His foresight was rewarded as his new shop on Williamsgate Street began to flourish.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Jan/2017 10:38:25

    On those electric lights, per the DIA :Perry also ran a private engineering practice in Galway. In 1888, with his brother John Perry, FRS, Professor of Mechanics and Mathematics at the Royal College of Science, London, and another partner, he built an electric power station at Galway for private consumers. The partners, who formed themselves into a limited company in 1897 with James Perry as managing director and chief engineer, carried out the lighting of the city in 1905

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Jan/2017 10:47:57

    Here are John and William Faller in the 1911 census.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Jan/2017 10:50:12

    Also in the 1911 census, Mary Leahy, shopkeeper and tobacconist. With that prompt, I can make out Leahy on the shop at left with the pipes and cigars sign (and Carol's mystery Irish note)

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Jan/2017 10:53:37

    GeoHive OSI 25" map shows the tram route.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Jan/2017 10:54:51

    Nearby in space and time: Eyre Square, Galway

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    Carol Maddock

    • 23/Jan/2017 10:58:16

    Hello all. We've just heard that Elinor Wiltshire died here in Dublin last Friday, at the grand old age of 99. She was a great photographer, and a lovely woman. We're privileged to have her photos in our collections here at the National Library of Ireland. These are just some of Elinor's photos that we've featured here on Flickr: www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/tags/wiltshirephotographi...

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    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Jan/2017 11:19:49

    I see a couple of dodgy entries in the NIAH - Hanleys entry says 1820, but the fancy oriel windows etc. are nowhere to be seen here (McDonaghs hardware shop is lower and plainer altogether), and Hibernian Building claimed as 1850, has obviously been rebuilt since this photo.

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    Swordscookie

    • 23/Jan/2017 11:27:51

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] So sorry to read about Elinors death, RIP! She provided some brilliant images of a particular time in Dublin with great insight! As regards your note on the image above as I read it is appears to be "Diaitim" which does not make any sense to me??????

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Jan/2017 11:27:57

    The buildings return from 1911 identifies Leahys, Fallers, a butchers shop (I see sides of meat beyond Fallers), and two shops I can't make out: one could be Drapers shop, selling lace? What is a Trail shop? Fruit shop, it says Fruit shop.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Jan/2017 12:04:49

    On that dodgy Hanleys entry in the NIAH: the DIA has an entry from 1919-1922 for Demolition and rebuilding of premises WILLIAMSGATE STREET, F. MCDONAGH & CO, so the modern Hanley's shop dates from 1922, not 1820. This photo must be before 1919, but we knew that already.

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    guliolopez

    • 23/Jan/2017 14:04:43

    Sad news https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]. Thanks for letting us know.

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    Carol Maddock

    • 23/Jan/2017 14:38:54

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] No problem.

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    DannyM8

    • 23/Jan/2017 16:11:04

    There is a dog....

  • profile

    guliolopez

    • 23/Jan/2017 17:57:28

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley is a near one-man-band on the dating front today. And whittled it down to after 1905 (lights), before 1919 (Hanleys) and probably somewhere in the middle - around the 1911 census. If the Marys need to hear a "second" from the floor, I'd agree with early/mid-1910s. The census returns (buildings and households) all largely align with the shops and shopkeepers we see. And, while not 100%, would seem to fit with the fashions on show. https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] and https://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie, I was hopeful of deciphering that Irish text. Perhaps by figuring out what business/business-person was operating there. And backforming from there. No luck though. As with Sean, I cannot make any sense (even with a little context) of "D(h)iait(h)m(h)". If pushed, I'd guess it's a translation of the name of the (tobacconists?) shop below.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Jan/2017 21:48:46

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] The Tobacconist is Mary Leahy. Which is almost the name of a certain Secretary to Liberian National Library I am thinking the Irish word is related to Dath, something to do with dyeing or painting?

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Jan/2017 21:49:36

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] The Tobacconist is Mary Leahy. Which is almost the name of a certain Secretary to Liberian National Library I am thinking the Irish word is related to Dath, something to do with dyeing or painting?

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    silverio10

    • 23/Jan/2017 22:06:57

    Buenas fotos antiguas .

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 23/Jan/2017 23:48:30

    Thanks to https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley and everyone - Have updated the map, description, date and tags accordingly. Thanks also https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] for keeping Elinor Wiltshire in our thoughts today. We will hopefully find a way to mark her passing on this stream in the coming days.

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    O Mac

    • 24/Jan/2017 00:03:59

    Colonial Buildings mid 1870's from Chetham's Library Galway Album www.flickr.com/photos/chethams_library/albums/72157634116... www.flickr.com/photos/chethams_library/9041071152/in/albu...

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    Dr. Ilia

    • 31/Jan/2017 09:00:07

    Wonderful capture