Passengers going to Graiguenamanagh in brakes

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Where: Waterford, Ireland

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When: 01 September 1911

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Why? I mean why would you want to go to Graiguenamanagh in the first place? Why go there in the buckets of rain? In an open car, late in an Irish summer? In any event, this fine Poole shot captures groups of passengers in horse drawn transport leaving for the town of Graiguenamanagh (but from where?)

As suggested by Rory Sherlock, these passengers are leaving from Merchant's Quay, Waterford (with St Saviours visible to the rear). Beachcomber tells us that the "brake" carriages are "large, four-wheeled carriage-frame with no body". And, while these carriages have "no body" they are certainly carrying plenty of bodies - pressed together on the 25m/half-day journey to Graiguenamanagh, Co. Kilkenny. O Mac and guliolopez offer answers to our (perhaps bluntly put) question about why such a group would brave the weather in an open carriage on such a long journey - with confirmation that a rail and steamer strike was in place at the time, leaving "Waterford Isolated" otherwise (as per the Irish Independent article linked in the comments)....


Photographer: A. H. Poole

Collection: Poole Photographic Studio, Waterford

Date: c.23 September 1911

NLI Ref: POOLEWP 2129

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 24952
ahpoole arthurhenripoole glassnegative nationallibraryofireland raining wetground groupsofpeople horsedrawnbrakes omnibuses buses graiguenamagh cokilkenny thecats umbrellas macintoshes brake merchantsquay stsaviourswaterford passengers puddles graigue doran strike locationidentified poolephotographiccollection

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  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 20/Jan/2017 09:49:20

    Apologies for the delay in posting, an early appointment screwed our plans up!

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 20/Jan/2017 10:18:11

    23 September 1911 was a Saturday,

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    Rory_Sherlock

    • 20/Jan/2017 10:22:30

    I'd say that's the dome of the St Saviour's Dominican Church on Bridge Street in Waterford in the background (right)

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    Rory_Sherlock

    • 20/Jan/2017 10:29:56

    Yes - this was taken on Merchant's Quay in Waterford - the building with the barred windows and the church are visible in this image: catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000592135

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Jan/2017 10:43:30

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] Oi! What have you got against Graigue? A lovely spot: Graigenamanagh

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 20/Jan/2017 10:48:51

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley We never said there was anything wrong with Graigue, we just asked why one would wish to go there? :) Looks gorgeous (but maybe not in the rain!) :)

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    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Jan/2017 10:49:01

    Also, given that the lead car has T. DORAN GRAIGUE on it, it is possible that these people are from Graigue, and were only visiting Waterford.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Jan/2017 10:52:47

    I only see one T. Doran in Graiguenamanagh in 1911.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Jan/2017 10:55:53

    5 folks with Car in their occupation live in Graiguemanagh [sic] in the 1911 census, 4 car drivers and a "car maid".

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    WeFive5

    • 20/Jan/2017 11:09:01

    Terrific quality. Thank you.

  • profile

    woodworker_34

    • 20/Jan/2017 11:24:07

    woodworker 34 Is that a cash box for the fares the driver of the front car is holding or were they transporting other valuables.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 20/Jan/2017 11:30:50

    "A brake (French: break), was a horse-drawn carriage used in the 19th and early 20th centuries in the training of horses for draft work. A shooting-brake, was a brake pressed into service to carry beaters, gamekeepers and sportsmen with their dogs, guns and game. There were purpose-built shooting-brakes designed to carry the driver and a footman or gamekeeper at the front facing forward, and passengers on longitudinal benches, with their dogs, guns and game borne along the sides in slatted racks. ... " From en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brake_(carriage)

  • profile

    Rory_Sherlock

    • 20/Jan/2017 12:06:20

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Perhaps he has a contract to transport mail - he certainly seems keen to have the locked box in the photo

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    La Belle Province

    • 20/Jan/2017 12:37:53

    Huge hats, even on the gents.

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    Foxglove

    • 20/Jan/2017 14:04:06

    there is always one unshod. child

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 20/Jan/2017 14:48:35

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I strongly suspect that you are correct on that, the spire is pretty distinctive St Saviour's is pretty distinctive. Hve updated the map accordingly!

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 20/Jan/2017 14:50:13

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/foxglove I noted that and the boy beside him is very well shod but has sacking for an overcoat? Perhaps they are brothers and first up chose boots or coat? You know the old maxim: "First up - best dressed".

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    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 21/Jan/2017 00:27:51

    23 Sep 1911. One wonders what the topic of discussion might have been on the journey. Maybe . . . "In the first major demonstration by Protestant Irishmen against "Home Rule" and the separation of all of Ireland from the United Kingdom, Edward Carson led the march of 50,000 Unionists in Northern Ireland from Belfast to Craigavon, the home of James Craig, 1st Viscount Craigavon, and addressed the crowd, declaring, "We must be prepared.. the morning Home Rule passes, ourselves to become responsible for the government of the Protestant Province of Ulster" en.wikipedia.org/wiki/September_1911

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    caoin

    • 22/Jan/2017 05:15:57

    ❝Why? I mean why would you want to go to Graiguenamanagh in the first place?❞ Ar thóir na manach b’fhéidir?

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 22/Jan/2017 09:59:07

    Waterford to Graiguenamanagh is a long way to go by horse and cart ...on a wet day. The reason is more than likely because the railwaymen of the GSWR were on strike in August/September 1911.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Jan/2017 11:45:29

    Ah - That https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] would make a lot of sense, and explain why it was so busy - and seemingly worthy of capture. (We had - with absolutely no slight to Graiguenamanagh intended - wondered why so many would take the 5 or 6 hour journey by open cart on such a seemingly bad day. Your explanation explains it completely.) Will take a look at the news archives for more info and update the description later. Thanks!

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    guliolopez

    • 22/Jan/2017 16:47:02

    Hi [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland]. I had a look at the archives today, and as [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] points-out there was a general strike at the time - the papers of Autumn 1911 are choc with it. I won't repost it all, but this full-page spread in the Independent from Sunday 26 September 1911 carries the crux of it. Including this extract under a very dramatic and telling headline/sub-title - which covers the mood (and weather) in the city at the time:

    WATERFORD ISOLATED The Great Western Railway Co. have suspended sailings from Waterford, as the firemen and sailors of the steamer Great Southern have joined the men of the Company's steamship Great Western and the quay porters who struck on Saturday. The Clyde Shipping Company's quay porters also refused to handle goods from the Great Southern station [...] The city is now practically isolated, and goods can neither be got into the city nor sent out [...] Military with fixed bayonets are guarding the goods on the quays. Owing to torrents of rain which fell today, the pickets were not out, and things were very quiet in the city.
    - Irish Independent 26 Sep 1911 www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/32462571335/

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Jan/2017 18:14:25

    Excellent https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]! And thanks again https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] . I've added this extra bit of critical info to the description - answering as it does, our key "why brave it?" question....

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    Salty Windows

    • 23/Jan/2017 18:38:31

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley As a youngster I earned my first bit of pocket money helping the local milkman Jim Doran (James Doran aged 2 in that census). It would not be uncommon for businessmen to have a second line of business so Tom Doran could well be our man.

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    jamica1

    • 23/Jan/2017 20:38:18

    Crowded

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    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Jan/2017 21:40:59

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gerrydunne Brilliant!