Church (Ruins), Waterville, Co. Kerry

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Where: Kerry, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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Labelled as "St. Fininan's Church (Ruins), Waterville, Co. Kerry", we have an interesting photo from the Eason Collection to start off the week. We are in the Kingdom, and as a Dub I am happy to visit Kerry at any time, but I am always happier to visit when "Sam Maguire" is residing in the Capital. (The Dub Mary!)

Based on input from Mosskayree, and corroberation from B-59, we have added this photo to our "Possible Cagalogue Correction" tag. It seems that this is actually very likely Derrynane Abbey, on the appropriately named Abbey Island, near the town of Caherdaniel in County Kerry. Mossy and beachcomberaustralia offer some additional detail on the history and folklore surrounding the abbey in the comments - including its connection to the O'Connell family of Derrynane.....


Photographer: Unknown

Collection: Eason Photographic Collection

Date: between ca. 1900-1939

NLI Ref: EAS_2386

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 19673
eason easonson easoncollection easonphotographiccollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland ireland kerry munster stfinian church ruins waterville ahamore abbey possiblecataloguecorrection derrynaneabbey derrynane oconnell caherdaniel countykerry locationidentified 20thcentury

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  • profile

    Myrtle26

    • 17/Oct/2016 08:23:27

    This picture is of the ruins of Derrynane Abbey at Derrynane. Daniel O'Connell's grandparents and his wife, amongst thousands of others are buried there. It is now a graveyard and in Abbey Island. The present day St Finian's Church is more than a mile from Waterville and far from the sea. The house in the picture belongs to the Earls of Dunraven and the tomb belongs to a Galvin family

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    B-59

    • 17/Oct/2016 08:30:44

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/mosskayree] correct en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Derrynane_Abbey OSI map: maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V2,452084,558300,11,9

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    B-59

    • 17/Oct/2016 08:36:01

    The Galvin family tomb: www.flickr.com/photos/roystonvasey/16211209838/

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 17/Oct/2016 11:03:27

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/mosskayree Well done, it is always good to get to the correct location when out catalogue entries are incorrect.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 17/Oct/2016 11:20:37

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] https://www.flickr.com/photos/mosskayree I would like to know more about the Galvin Tomb, any idea when it was built or first used?

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    Niall McAuley

    • 17/Oct/2016 11:54:45

    Here is a link to a pic of one of the markers on that tomb, with dates of 1899 and 1900.

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    Myrtle26

    • 17/Oct/2016 12:23:07

    The monastic settlement was established by the Monks of Lismore, came into the possession of Sir Walter Raleigh and then to Richard Boyle, Earl of Cork and father of 'the father of chemistry.' The O'Connells leased the land from the Boyles and Smith stayed with them when he was writing the History of Kerry. 'Will you please sell me that beautiful horse,' he requested, 'and I will speak highly of you in the book.' 'Take the horse for nothing,' those wise forefathers of O'Connell replied, 'and say nothing about us in the book.' Those who kept the head down and took what was going from land and smuggling survived best in old Ireland

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 17/Oct/2016 12:41:38

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Niall, thanks.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 17/Oct/2016 12:42:06

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/mosskayree Great story.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 17/Oct/2016 22:10:25

    1929 description of the place, including -

    The Ruined Abbey The third point in the pilgrimage is Derrynane Abbey, the ruins of which stand on a little isthmus of land, separated from the grounds of this house by a neck of sand. Here some attempt at preservation has been, made by occasional cementing and the erection of rude stone buttresses. There is very little to see. It is the local graveyard, and graves cram all the space of what was once the church. A credence table is almost intact. But the great, absorbing interest of this ruin is the tomb of Maire ni Dhuiv. This slab of stone, on an elevation opposite the high altar, with its obliterated inscription, is the best refutation of that dreary lie that O'Connell was no Gael. Maire ni Dhuiv was the mother of 'Old Huntingcup,' and was still living with him, though aged, when he adopted young Daniel. She is the most perfect, as she is the most recent, representative of true Gaelic culture and tradition. She had an enormous family (twenty-two children, to be exact), whom she ruled energetically, together with an army of servants and dependents. ...
    From trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/118065843

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    Myrtle26

    • 18/Oct/2016 09:58:58

    Beautiful description discovered by Beachcomber above. With regard to 'the most recent representative of true Gaelic culture' her daughter, Eileen, wrote Caoineadh Airt O'Laoighire (Lament for Art O'Leary) which is regarded by many as the best Irish poem of the Eighteenth Century. She had married O'Leary who disregarded the Penal Laws - to the displeasure of the O'Connells - and was shot off his horse at Carriganime, a little townland between Macroom and Millstreet, in 1773. One of her sisters, Mary, married Baldwin, an MP for Cork. He fought a duel, took a bullet through the mouth, sucked in the blood and shot his opponent dead. Maire Ní Dhuibh also wrote many poems including one on a boat arriving from France with 18 O'Connells or relations of O'Connells on board. The best account of the older generations of O'Connells is in The Last Colonel of the Irish Brigade by Mrs Morgan John O'Connell who, I think, was from Tipperary. Thanks to the National Library for all these beautiful photographs from all over the country. Thanks to Flickr on the Commons!

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    Making History Viewable on Site

    • 18/Oct/2016 17:47:34

    Hello, I need to get in touch with the person who uploads these pictures on Flickr. Please have the person email me directly on our Flickr account or at umesh(at)dintapp(dot)com Thanks. Regards, Umesh

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/Oct/2016 23:21:02

    Hi [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]]. Please consider using the Flickr Mail capability within the tool to get in touch. Thanks