Ticky tacky houses on a 'green field' site?

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Where: Wexford, Ireland

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When: 01 January 1931

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
An unusual commission for the Poole studios. Far from the elegance and wealth of a Papal Count's wedding yesterday, here are new built homes in an image commissioned by the British Portland Cement Association. Where were these houses and are they still standing?

In an amazing (even baffling) show of investigation skill, derangedlemur singlehandedly and quickly pinpointed the location to Town Wall st in New Ross, County Wexford. In doing so, our second question was also answered - that this near 90 year-old development at Ard na Gréine/JKL Place (built in the early years of the state's own development) is still a feature in New Ross today.....


Photographer: A. H. Poole

Collection: Poole Photographic Studio, Waterford

Date: c.1931

NLI Ref: POOLEWP 3838

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie


Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 51174
ahpoole arthurhenripoole glassnegative nationallibraryofireland houses semidetached semid greenfieldsite newross countywexford littleboxes suburban development terracedhousing britishportlandcementassociation townwall ardnagréine windmilllane jklplace johnkildareoloughlinplace explore poolephotographiccollection

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  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 06/Jul/2016 07:20:22

    Off the top of my head, it looks like Crumlin, but it could be anywhere. Waterford seems more likely given its provenance. Let's see what Google Maps says... edit: Crumlin indeed! What nonsense.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 06/Jul/2016 07:48:23

    'Similar Items' on the NLI catalogue all mention "commissioned by The British Portland Cement Association, 35 Dawson Street, Dublin" which might provide a clue.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 06/Jul/2016 07:50:51

    New Ross, maybe? www.google.ie/maps/@52.3936906,-6.9385801,3a,75y,120.31h,...

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 06/Jul/2016 07:52:03

    Where by maybe, I mean pretty definitely. That's them alright.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 06/Jul/2016 07:56:23

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Well done you! The houses look brand spanking new here; not a garden gnome or geranium pot in sight.

  • profile

    Gregory PC

    • 06/Jul/2016 08:00:17

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Well done! I would have only guessed this was Dublin (e.g. Cabra or Crumlin)

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Jul/2016 08:03:35

    There are curtains in windows, so the houses are occupied. The big changes since are a) garden walls and b) driveways, but I see at least one of the original iron gates was put onto the newer pillars.

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    Reconstructing Light

    • 06/Jul/2016 08:05:35

    The Celtic Tiger on the prowl.....

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 06/Jul/2016 08:20:11

    The road to the right is called the Town Wall (see the 1680 map at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Ross ). I wonder if the rubble in the foreground is remnants of the old wall ? Quick, someone post the OSI maps ... ... !

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 06/Jul/2016 08:26:22

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] Looks like there was a castle near there and a gate, but it's not clear that there was a wall along it - it seems to have previously been part of Windmill Lane. maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V2,672004,627372,11,7 Edit - by 1907 (ish) it is called Town Wall: maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V2,672004,627372,11,9

  • profile

    philfluther

    • 06/Jul/2016 08:49:13

    Remarks. 1. Doorsteps'! 2. Two up two down? 3. Pre electricity? 4. "Ticky tacky" for the era, luxury?

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 06/Jul/2016 08:56:59

    Also: www.youtube.com/watch?v=XUwUp-D_VV0

  • profile

    RETRO STU

    • 06/Jul/2016 09:32:25

    Why do some of those houses have two front doors?

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    derangedlemur

    • 06/Jul/2016 09:40:36

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] They actually have three; They're terraces. It's more obvious in Streetview now that everyone has painted their house a different colour.

  • profile

    Vab2009

    • 06/Jul/2016 11:24:32

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Well done!!

  • profile

    guliolopez

    • 06/Jul/2016 16:55:05

    No idea how you did that, but well done [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]]. Not sure I'd agree with tickey-tacky, (implying substandard materials) - given than they are clearly still there nearly 90 years later. ("Ticky-tacky" perhaps a term better applied more recently to certain developments in the east or mica issues in the north west :) )

  • profile

    Swordscookie

    • 06/Jul/2016 19:41:18

    I suspect that for Ireland it was the beginning of the development of suburbia even if it was down in Wexford! www.youtube.com/watch?v=4poWiKfg1MU

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 06/Jul/2016 21:58:58

    KLANG KLANG went the "Location Identified" bell! Serious kudos to https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] for the speed and accuracy in locating this one. As has been mentioned, it would seem pretty clear that these houses were not long completed when the Portland Cement Association commissioned this (likely commercially intended) snapshot of their work or wares. As https://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie and others mention, the late 1920s and early 1930s marked a period of suburban development throughout the country, and what was then a relatively new way of building and organising housing developments. Brilliant to be able to confirm the location of this particular development!

  • profile

    RETRO STU

    • 06/Jul/2016 22:26:42

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Thank you. Even if they were semi-detached houses, they'd still be small.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 07/Jul/2016 06:00:09

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Baffling - I like it. Houses Found. Flickeroonies Baffled! In fact, a rudimentary knowledge of irish urban development (ancient core goes in the middle, celtic tiger goes round the outside, this picture goes somewhere in between) coupled with an equally rudimentary knowledge of Poole's favourite haunts narrows it down to a few very specific areas of a few specific towns, and ruling out Tramore and Dungarvan only took a couple of seconds. The rest was Streetview.

  • profile

    Swordscookie

    • 07/Jul/2016 17:47:43

    Congratulations on Explore NLI! It is ironic that the outstanding shot with so much romance, personalities and international connections of the day before should have "normal" status and a shot of houses should go Exploring! Great work by the Lemur, fine detective work!

  • profile

    Dr. Ilia

    • 18/Jul/2016 08:00:24

    Superb shot

  • profile

    Salty Windows

    • 19/Jul/2016 13:16:10

    Fantastic detective work by derangedlemur . I notice the NLI online catalogue now has the full size images available from upriver at Graiguenamanagh and Bagenalstown. Fantastic detail and much more intriguing. Well done NLI!