Annesley Bridge, Cork City

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Where: Cork, Ireland

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When: 01 January 1870

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
It will be an achievement to arrive at a tight date range for this photograph of Annesley Bridge. There is a lot of work going on and a lot of people looking at the work! I think we have seen one of the "Telegraph Cable" signs before?

Given that not much in this view has changed, some kudos are due to B-59, guliolopez and O Mac for refining the image to the 1870s. Borrowing from guliolopez's comment below, it is confirmed that this is Anglesea Bridge (sometimes Annesley or Anglesey Bridge) over the south channel of the Lee at the end of the South Mall, Cork. Built in 1830, this "lifting" bridge was removed in 1880 and replaced by a "swing" bridge that opened as Parnell Bridge in 1882. (Hence we are likely before ~1880). Up on the hill we see Government House which dates to perhaps 1869/1870. (Hence we are likely after ~1870). The guys used the existence/non-existence of several other buildings to corroborate this range - but it's somewhat interesting that the subjects of two previous posts (Parnell Bridge and Government House) helped refine the 50 year catalogue range to a single decade or so....


Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Catalogue range c.1865-1914. But likely 1870s.

NLI Ref: L_CAB_00808

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 18061
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio glassnegative nationallibraryofireland cork ireland munster annesleybridge parnellplace southmall provincialbankofireland corksavingsbank lappsquay warrenplace telegraphcable parnellbridge lawrencephotographcollection

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    B-59

    • 01/Jul/2016 07:31:50

    Anglesea Bridge, now Parnell Bridge. (The new bridge was opened on 18 November 1882, and existed until 1971.) archiseek.com/2010/1880-parnell-bridge-cork/ PS: This is the old bridge, built in the 1830s, s. www.corkpastandpresent.ie/mapsimages/CPP2013/juicebox_cpp... Streetview 2014: goo.gl/maps/yY3LGM8HgpM2

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    guliolopez

    • 01/Jul/2016 07:35:17

    Wayhay - Cork! Morning Mary true to word and doesn't disappoint :) I recon this is 1870s. Definitely not after 1882 and probably not before 1869. Will get my thoughts together and explain why I say this in a bit...

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    B-59

    • 01/Jul/2016 07:46:20

    It was sometimes called "Anglesey Bridge", s. e.g. 'Historical and Descriptive Notices of the City of Cork, etc' by John WINDELE, p. 30 (books.google.com/books?id=ILVYAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA30&lp...), but I couldn't find other sources with "Annesley Bridge" in Cork.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 01/Jul/2016 07:46:37

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Clinging on to the edge of my chair in anticipation !

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 01/Jul/2016 07:53:50

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] There is an Annesley Bridge over the River Tolka in Dublin. Not that helps much here.

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    O Mac

    • 01/Jul/2016 08:03:56

    We were here before.. This being the swing bridge that replaced the above in early 1880's www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/11081361686/in/photolist-...

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    B-59

    • 01/Jul/2016 08:06:06

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] Yes, but this is certainly the Anglesey/Anglesea Bridge, Cork, see - maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V2,567900,571815,11,7 - maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V2,567878,571810,12,9

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    guliolopez

    • 01/Jul/2016 08:10:48

    So. Am back :) As others have already pointed-out, this view hasn't really changed all that dramatically. Although obviously the large vessels either side of the bridge are an impossibility now :) As advertised and already mentioned by others, this is Anglesey Bridge (1830). Also called Annesley Bridge (without the G) or Anglesea Bridge (without the Y). This bridge was designed by Richard Griffiths (Cork civil engineer) and built by Thomas Deane (noted architect). After lots of wrangling in the 1870s, this original "lifting" bridge was replaced by a "swing" bridge and opened November 1882. The replacement was named Parnell Bridge. As already pointed-out, we've seen an 1883 image of the replacement bridge before. The current concrete span dates to 1971. Anyway, means we're definitely before November 1882. To the left and right of the bridge are two obvious bank buildings. To the bridge's right is Cork Savings Bank at 1 Lapps Quay. Opened 1842, it doesn't help with image dating. However beside it is the double gable-front of 15 Parnell Place (then Warren Place). BOI dates this probate court building to ~1865. So >= 1865. To the bridge's left is the Provincial Bank of Ireland at 97 South Mall. Also from 1865, it's no extra help with date. However beside THAT is 95 South Mall. BOI dates these offices to ~1870s. Although StreetView clearly shows that a third storey was added after "our" image, it suggests >= 1870s. Up on the hill we see Goverment House (below/to right of the Barracks walls). If our image is from 1870s or very early 1880s (and I think it is), this house must've been pretty new at the time. In a previous thread we dated Government House to perhaps 1870s. Apart from the ships and the bridge itself, the big change for me is the unobstructed views of Victoria/Collins barracks (1805) higher-up on the hill. And Patrick's Place lower down. The latter now blocked behind the lump that is the Merchant's Quay development (1980s/90s). Anyway, upshot: Probably 1870s. Or early 1880s. Definitely not after autumn 1882.

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    O Mac

    • 01/Jul/2016 08:22:05

    14 Parnell Place ( present Crown Decorator Center) not yet there. The NIAH put the earliest date on this building at 1875 [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] We saw Underwater Telegraph Cable marker at Valentia rail head.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 01/Jul/2016 08:45:40

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] That was worth the wait ! A slight digression via Trove - in July 1882 there was argy-bargy and demonstrations over the naming of the new Parnell bridge - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/111317732

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 01/Jul/2016 09:06:00

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Valentia, of course.

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    O Mac

    • 01/Jul/2016 09:44:55

    The Irish Builder Vol XX11 .1880 states.. "OUR illustration shews (sic) elevation and plan of a swivel bridge now being erected across the Lee, the Corporation and Harbour Board of Cork jointly undertaking the expense. It has been designed by Mr.Fiddler , C.E., of London, and the contract was taken by Mr. Alexander Rooney, C.E.,of Queenstown,at £16,400. Mr Rooney has just erected the temporary wooden bridge (a separate contract), and is already working with his accustomed energy at the permanent structure...." This would narrow the date range ------ 1875 to 1880

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    guliolopez

    • 01/Jul/2016 11:43:01

    Hi https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] - Great find from the Builder!! Nice one. Definitely certainly helps limit the upper-part of the range (from when the new bridge was opened in 1882 to when - clearly - the old one was demolished and temporary installed in 1880). Well done! As regards the lower part of the range however, I'm not sure the 1875 date "works". The warehouses (later paint depot) at 14 Parnell Place were built in the 1880s. NIAH/BOI says "built c. 1885". So I don't think that helps to limit the lower half of the range... (As you note yourself, 1875 is the earliest possible date. Not the latest date :) Which NIAH gives as 1895. Given that the building is not visible, it's the later date that define the upper bound. Not the other way around :) Hope I'm making sense :) I think we're still at c.1869-1880.... (FYI - My gut tells me this is mid or latter half of 1870s. And so I agree with the suggestion. But the maths/logic of it don't necessarily confirm it :) )

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    O Mac

    • 01/Jul/2016 17:45:38

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] I'm scratching my head here.. ..being from Cork you're right... Far be it for me to be party to your guts innervations but I would agree it most probably was taken mid to late 1870's. We have seen the distant house on the hill before. This was Government House which was built 1869/70 and burnt 1922. Comparing the W.L. below it's tower, fancy porch and annex have yet to be added. Archiseek are vague and give us the 1880's as construction date......woohoo...they're wrong www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/24160747336/in/dateposted/

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 02/Jul/2016 23:27:22

    Thanks all. With kudos in particular to https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected], have borrow heavily (but also summarised quite a bit :) ) from the comment above :) Have also refined the date range based on work from https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] (on lower bound) and https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] (on upper bound). Great stuff as usual!!

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    guliolopez

    • 03/Jul/2016 00:03:44

    For comparison and as a reminder, here's [https://www.flickr.com/photos/spudmurphy]'s comparative view of the two bridge's that replaced Deane and Griffith's 1830s lifting bridge. Above is the 1882 swivel bridge (upon which we see a tram the swivel bridge carried). Below is the 1971 fixed concrete span (again with the traffic it was put in place to carry). www.flickr.com/photos/spudmurphy/210453558/ EDIT: While the view across the South Mall, Lapps Quay corner, and down Parnell Place may not have changed much, if French's shot was slightly left it would be somewhat different (given that the conical tower of Sutton's (seen here c.1920) was burned in the 1960s. And if he turned around entirely, the view of the Corn Exchange (city hall), Carnegie Library, bridge/etc (seen here c.1910) would be significantly changed. Pretty much only the Albert Quay Station frontage from this view remains...