Caledon Hill and monument.

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Where: Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

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When: 01 January 1900

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Caledon Hill and Monument doesn't mean anything to me without carrying out a search for it so I suspect that it is in the North rather than anywhere down South. A "Nelsons Pillar" style column with a statue atop and with cast iron railings to the front with a long lead-in path should be readily identifiable. The format would indicate that Mr. Mason used this as a lantern slide for one of his lectures.

Based on today's contributions, we learned that this is indeed Caledon Monument, on the lands of Caledon Estate in County Tyrone. Built in the 1840s in memory of the 2nd Earl Caledon the column was topped by a statue by Cork-born sculptor Thomas Kirk. A local landmark for some time, the hill was apparently used as an observation point during WW2. The column and statue were destroyed during the Troubles, with seemingly only parts of the base plinth remaining today....

Collection: Mason Photographic Collection

Date: ca. 1890-1910

NLI Ref: M37/23

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 21650
thomasholmesmason thomasmayne thomashmasonsonslimited lanternslides nationallibraryofireland caledonhill monument ulster monkeypuzzle araucariaaraucana caledon caledonestate caledonmonument earlofcaledon nolongerstanding thomaskirk duprealexander countytyrone

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  • profile

    O Mac

    • 19/May/2016 08:25:04

    It was blown up/down on 14 March 1973.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 19/May/2016 08:36:34

    Streetview shows that the avenue of monkey puzzlers has grown considerably at the site.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 19/May/2016 08:41:14

    Dates from 1840, per the DIA The statue was by Thomas Kirk, who did indeed also do Nelson atop his Dublin Pillar.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 19/May/2016 08:43:16

    The original Lawrence Collection photo.

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 19/May/2016 08:43:59

    It was a memorial to this "toff" .. Du Pre Alexander, 2nd Earl of Caledon Peerage Page

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 19/May/2016 08:54:08

    This Bing aerial shot shows that the plinth is still there.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 19/May/2016 08:55:38

    It was just 2km from the border with the Republic.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 19/May/2016 09:01:56

    Oh dear, are those railing pillars "fasces"?

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 19/May/2016 09:09:20

    Monkey Puzzle Tree or Chilean pine.... Araucaria Araucana. Maybe planted in reference to the Earls tennure in the Southern Hemisphere. He was the first Governor of the Cape of Good Hope. The lions and spears no doubt another reference..

  • profile

    j.coffey78

    • 19/May/2016 09:20:34

    Caledon, County Tyrone, sorry I was puzzled myself.

  • profile

    mikescottnz

    • 19/May/2016 11:02:21

    Caledon historically known as Kinnaird (Irish: Cionn Aird (head/top of the height or hill) ) is a small village and townland in County Tyrone, Ulster. It lies in the southeast of Tyrone and near the borders of County Armagh and County Monaghan. It is situated in the historic barony of Dungannon Lower and the civil parish of Aghaloo. The name Caledon appears to be a shortened version of Caledonia, the old Latin name for Scotland. Originating from the Pictish tribe of northern Scotland, the Caledonii, the term means "great, hard/tough people".[?] The old settlement of Kinard was burned in 1608 by the forces of Sir Cahir O'Doherty during O'Doherty's Rebellion. Sir Henry Óg O'Neill, the main local landowner, was killed by the rebels. Caledon House was built in 1779 by James Alexander, a member of the Irish House of Commons for Londonderry, who had previously in 1778 bought the Caledon Estate. James Alexander was made Baron Caledon in 1790 and later Viscount Caledon in 1797. The House was begun in 1779 to designs by Thomas Cooley, but altered by John Nash in 1808-10. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caledon,_County_Tyrone

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    guliolopez

    • 19/May/2016 12:30:23

    TwitPic of "demolition" aftermath, which likely shows the bits of the plinth that are still visible in the aerial view that [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] provides: twitter.com/conflictni/status/582658179860951041

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    RETRO STU

    • 19/May/2016 19:12:02

    Are the lions still there?

  • profile

    guliolopez

    • 19/May/2016 22:15:59

    The post-explosion TwitPic suggests at least one survived - whether it's still there might require some local insight. There's several images of different troops based around Caledon during WW2, with a note on this one suggesting the monument was used as an RAF observation post in the period...

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    DannyM8

    • 19/May/2016 23:15:18

    The "no longer standing" album is very appropriate for this photo!!

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 19/May/2016 23:44:39

    Indeed https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] - although one hopes that album won't grow too quickly however :) Have updated the map, tags, etc based on everyone's usually stellar inputs.

  • profile

    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 01/Jun/2016 23:50:32

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] they huffed, and puffed, and blew the column down.