Princess of Wales (Princess May).

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When: 01 January 1900

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From Monday's lady with her ass and cart to a lady with frills and flounces in abundance! Princess Mary the Princess of Wales from the Poole collection. Did she sit for Mr. Poole or is this a copy for some reason or other?

From today's contributions it seems plausible that this image of Mary of Teck (later Queen Mary of the United Kingdom) is a copy. It was possibly labelled in the early 1900s (when she was titled as Princess of Wales) from an earlier 1890s original (when titled Duchess of York). Sharon.corbet highlights an extract from an 1897 description of her attire during a visit to Ireland - which could well describe this image:
 "[..] while at the Dublin horse show she wore plain green muslin trimmed with Irish lace of a yellow toce, and caught up on the bodice with emerald and diamond shamrock brooches"


Photographer: A. H. Poole

Collection: Poole Photographic Studio, Waterford

Date: catalogue range c.1901-1954 (likely 1900s copy of 1890s image)

NLI Ref: POOLEWP 1220

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 26946
ahpoole arthurhenripoole glassnegative nationallibraryofireland maryofteck victoriamaryaugustalouiseolgapaulineclaudineagnes queenconsortoftheunitedkingdom georgev duchessofyork princessofwales shamrock brooch lace shamrockbrooch poolephotographiccollection

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    sharon.corbet

    • 24/May/2016 07:45:07

    Given that she's being referred to as Princess of Wales, the (original?) photo must date from between late 1901 (when her husband George became Prince of Wales) and 1910 (when he became King). Princess Mary of Teck (also known as 'May')

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    Niall McAuley

    • 24/May/2016 08:09:54

    Over on Pinterest I see this image labelled: HRH the Duchess of York (later HM Queen Mary) wearing the diamond and emerald shamrock brooch she later left to her daughter-in-law Marina Duchess of Kent and now worn by Princess Michael of Kent.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 24/May/2016 08:11:30

    And indeed, here is Princess Micheal of Kent with the brooch.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 24/May/2016 08:19:57

    This clipping from the Glasgow Herald, July 5th 1893 suggests it was a wedding gift from Sir Frederick and Lady Milner, although it says four leafed rather than 3.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 24/May/2016 08:29:43

    Her wedding dress featured rose, thistle and shamrock motifs for England,Scotland, and Ireland. No leeks or daffodils?

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    Niall McAuley

    • 24/May/2016 08:32:16

    From the nli archive MARC: Note in Poole Index Book: 'Copy'.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 24/May/2016 09:12:52

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Poor Wales doesn't get a look in the Union Jack either.

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    DannyM8

    • 24/May/2016 09:49:04

    The following is rather harsh I think The new Queen, due to her shyness, often come across as rather unsmiling and austere, leading the couple to be referred to by the less reverential as George and the Dragon. From the same link - Windsor and Mountbatten In 1917, concerned that his own teutonic name would alienate his subjects, the King changed the name of his house from the German Saxe-Coburg-Gotha of Queen Victoria's consort to Windsor. The name was suggested by his private secretary. At the same time his Battenberg cousins were encouraged to change theirs to the Anglicised form of Mountbatten. 'Arrived Prince Hyde, departed Lord Jekyll' wrote the King's cousin, Louis Mountbatten, in a visitor book at the time. Queen Mary's Teck brothers Adolphus and Alexander (Prince Francis of Teck, who turned out to be something of a royal rebel had died in 1910) were similarly granted the anglisized titles of created Marquess of Cambridge and Earl of Athlone respectively.

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    domenico milella

    • 24/May/2016 10:26:58

    Thanks and Congratulation for your beautiful Album. Nice day.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 24/May/2016 11:56:22

    There is a description of the then Duke and Duchess of York's visit to Dublin in 1897 here mentioning the following: "while at the Dublin horse show she wore plain green muslin trimmed with Irish lace of a yellow toce, and caught up on the bodice with emerald' and diamond shamrock brooches"

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    maorlando - God keeps me as I lean on Him!!

    • 24/May/2016 20:35:37

    Ahhhh... Sharon I think you have described her lovely attire for this portrait perfectly.... wonderful portrait and amazing research as always... luv it... way to go team NLI!!!!

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 24/May/2016 22:57:25

    Brilliant https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] - that does seem a plausible description of the Poole collection entry we see here. Based also on the inputs from https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley, it seems quite plausible that this is a copy made (or certainly labelled) in the early 1900s, from an original dating from the 1890s. Have updated the description/etc to reflect this possibility.....

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    nannyjean35

    • 30/May/2016 11:53:37

    she was very beautiful

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    Niall McAuley

    • 28/Oct/2016 17:55:30

    The Princess in Kilkenny in the same outfit and hairdo, on Thursday 20 April 1899. I think this is a copy of a photo from that time and place: A Royal group in Kilkenny Castle

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    Old Family Images

    • 24/Dec/2016 12:53:09

    Now I know where Prince Charles gets his good looks.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 29/Dec/2016 17:32:45

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Meee-ow!