V. Herbert (LOC)

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Where: Unknown

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When: 01 January 1915

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Bain News Service,, publisher.

V. Herbert

[between ca. 1915 and ca. 1920]

1 negative : glass ; 5 x 7 in. or smaller.

Notes:
Title from data provided by the Bain News Service on the negative.
Photograph shows composer and cellist Victor August Herbert (1859-1924) playing pool. Herbert was one of the founders of the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP). (Source: Flickr Commons project, 2015)
Forms part of: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress).

Format: Glass negatives.

Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication.

Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

General information about the Bain Collection is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.ggbain

Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.26619

Call Number: LC-B2- 4553-6

Info:

Owner: The Library of Congress
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 11469
libraryofcongress dc:identifier=httphdllocgovlocpnpggbain26619 xmlns:dc=httppurlorgdcelements11 pool cigar billards

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    maorlando - God keeps me as I lean on Him!!

    • 15/Apr/2016 21:08:02

    Ha Ha... doesn't seem to be an avid pool player.

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    FreeRangeBob

    • 19/Apr/2016 01:50:57

    It is clearly a pocket table---why are there 2 cue balls and why is he attempting a Massy shot?

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    Retired at last

    • 19/Apr/2016 18:14:14

    Because he's playing billiards. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_billiards

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    (The) Appleman

    • 24/Apr/2016 04:23:53

    Except a true billiard table doesn't have pockets...........

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    Retired at last

    • 27/Apr/2016 17:51:58

    Yes it does, you play billiards on the same table as you play snooker. It's a carom table that lacks the pockets.

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    (The) Appleman

    • 27/Apr/2016 20:29:02

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] Have to disagree with you again my friend. I was a nine-ball player for almost twenty years and been around pool halls and major pool and billiard tournaments a large part of my life. In my youth I played snooker primarily in preparation of hustling (on what we termed, "slop tables" (8-ball pool). Regulation Snooker tables are genuinely known as 12' x 6' tables (actual playing surface: 11'-8.5" x 5-10") and they most definitely do have pockets, albeit, pockets smaller than a normal pool table (because snooker uses smaller balls). Additionally the pockets on a snooker table are not crescent shaped as on a normal pool table, making it more difficult to sink a ball especially when shooing from narrow angles. A player usually has to apply "english" (spin) on both, the cue ball which interacts with the object ball in order to sink difficult shots like these. Twenty-two balls are used in the game of snooker: 15 red balls, 6 numbered balls and of course, a cue ball. Although "true billiards" a/k/a "English billiards is sometimes played on a pool table with pockets (as may be the case in the picture above) but this would not be considered regulation three-corner billiards and in no case would tournament billiards (nor any "big money") billiards games be played on any table containing pockets. Some confusion exists because over time, the terms, "billiards" and "pool" have been used synonymously when in fact billiards and pool are two totally different types of games. The rules of the game of "9-ball pool" are rather complex and I will not attempt to explain in this forum. These can be found here - www.wpa-pool.com/web/index.asp?id=117&; Hope this clarifies everything.

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    FreeRangeBob

    • 27/Apr/2016 22:10:10

    This does appear to be a snooker table -I aslo grew up playing snooker but I never saw anyone playing billiards on one--there was a billiards table for that in the pool hall. Still, that appears to be an 8 ball rather that the traditional red object ball. I think it was just a posed publicity shot. Wonder if the stoogie gets smoked while playing the cello? ps hard to find a snooker table these days only slop tables What great finesse the great snooker players had---Guess where the phrase "snookered" came from?.

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    (The) Appleman

    • 27/Apr/2016 23:48:46

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/freerangebob/ What make you think this is a snooker table? The pockets aren't clear enough in the picture to determine that. ........... "hooked" - "snookered", biggest part of playing nine-ball.

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    Retired at last

    • 29/Apr/2016 17:13:43

    It's probably the lack of pool tables in the UK influencing me. But over here billiards is a game played with two white balls, distinguished by one having a spot, and a red ball on a table that can also be used for snooker. The pockets are obvious in this picture en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_billiards#/media/File:Billi... from 1899. The sport is run by the World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association and the rules are the ones agreed in 1899, with minor changes. I still have a half size snooker table in my garage.

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    (The) Appleman

    • 29/Apr/2016 18:38:01

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ This picture (the link you included) looks more like a football (or should I say, rugby) field than a billiard table! ;)

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    Retired at last

    • 30/Apr/2016 15:20:24

    Roger, if we're looking at the same picture, I see nothing that makes me think rugby, or American or Gaelic football. The stick in his hands might point to shinty or baseball. :-)