"Salthill Hotel" - but not in Co Galway, it's Co Dublin

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Where: Dublin, , Ireland

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When: Unknown

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The recent scenes from Salthill in Galway are in marked contrast to the beautiful still conditions in this lovely Lawrence image of (allegedly) the same spot. We thought it was perhaps too calm to be the west coast. And indeed today's commenters have provided evidence that, though labelled as "Salthill Hotel, Salthill, Co. Galway" in our catalogue, this is more likely to be Co. Dublin.

Though confirmed to be the "Salthill Hotel", this image was captured not in County Galway, but in Monkstown, close to Dun Laoghaire, County Dublin. With thanks in particular to AndyBrii, Niall McAuley, B-59, and RETRO STU for insights on the location, and sharon.corbet, beachcomberaustralia and O Mac on the details which helped refine the range by a further 2 decades....


Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Between 1865 - 1914 (but likely before 1894 given that we can't see the treatment plant that was added on/after that date)

NLI Ref: L_CAB_06100

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 24968
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio glassnegative nationallibraryofireland possiblecataloguecorrection salthillhotel monkstown countydublin dublinandkingstownrailway dunlaoghaire locationidentified lawrencephotographcollection

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    AndyBrii

    • 12/Jan/2016 07:37:50

    An old woodcut: 1843 – Salthill Hotel, Monkstown, Co. Dublin:: archiseek.com/wp-content/gallery/ireland-dublin/0921.jpg Designed by J.S. Mulvany for the Dublin & Kingstown Railway Co., around 1836 but not constructed until 1843. Extended in the 1860s by John McCurdy, who also added the mansard roof. Destroyed by fire in 1970 and demolished in 1972. Now the site of apartments. archiseek.com/2014/salthill-hotel-monkstown-co-dublin/

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    Niall McAuley

    • 12/Jan/2016 08:55:57

    Definitely not Salthill in Galway, this is Monkstown, as https://www.flickr.com/photos/angeljim46 says, taken from the West Pier at Kingstown Harbour, now Dun Laoghaire.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 12/Jan/2016 09:06:53

    Reverse view: Salthill Railway Station and Hotel

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    B-59

    • 12/Jan/2016 09:14:55

    OSI map: maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V2,723369,728785,11,9

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    sharon.corbet

    • 12/Jan/2016 09:59:04

    Later shot of the hotel: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/3377038110

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 12/Jan/2016 11:22:27

    A couple of questions ... What is going on in the middle distance? Are those segregated bathing pools? The 25" map shows a "Sewage Tank (Covered)", which doesn't seem compatible. And with the help of the marvellous new megazoom - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000333811 - there is a name above the very scruffy looking hotel door - "W GREEN" or "W BREEN" who might have been the licensee, thus narrrowing the date range. Also [Ken]nedy(?) Carriage Establish[me]nt at left. Thinking all the NLI photos will require revisiting to find yet more detail with megazoom !

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    sharon.corbet

    • 12/Jan/2016 11:50:29

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia According to the 1862 Thom's Almanac, the hotelkeeper was William Parry, whereas the livery stable was owned by William Connor. Plus: Kingstown Railway Company's Baths— John Crosthwaite, proprietor

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    sharon.corbet

    • 12/Jan/2016 11:55:02

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] This one is a bit clearer - I see "W. PARRY" over the door, when I megazoom in. On the other hand, here you can see the full building on the left - "Job Carriage, A Funeral Establishment, J. [K]ennedy and Company".

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    O Mac

    • 12/Jan/2016 12:17:43

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] The photograph was taken before that underground sewage tank/works was built--that which is shown on the historic map. The jetty in the foreground above is not the one shown on the map but one which later became the outer edge of the infill (centered here). The newer "map" jetty covered the outflow pipe from the sewage tanks/works and was probably built from the excavated spoil as was the landfill area shown on the map The 25" OSI map was surveyed in June 1907 (DN023-06+02 01/Jun/1907 published 01/Jun/1911)

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    Niall McAuley

    • 12/Jan/2016 12:21:38

    William Parry, Hotel Proprietor, in the 1901 census. He's 85 in 1901, so he may have been there for some time...

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    sharon.corbet

    • 12/Jan/2016 12:37:08

    Here claims "In 1894, a sewage works was built at the west pier, which is still in use today."

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    RETRO STU

    • 12/Jan/2016 12:37:38

    That ain't Salthill in Galway, looks more like somewhere in Dublin.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 12/Jan/2016 12:41:41

    Oddly enough, Parry's son William Kaye Parry was an architect and engineer specializing in... sewerage schemes.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 12/Jan/2016 13:42:49

    Thanks [https://www.flickr.com/photos/angeljim46],[https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley],[https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]], [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]], and everyone for the corrections. We've added an (interim) description update for now, and tagged with the (ever growing) "Possible catalogue correction" label. Will update other elements later. Great insights as usual...

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    O Mac

    • 12/Jan/2016 14:51:36

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] That 1894 date ties in with a DIA entry of the works of William Kaye-Parry, Chief surveyer at Kingstown at the time, So Pre 1894.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 12/Jan/2016 19:52:19

    Thanks again all - on both the location confirmation/correction and the date refinement. We've updated the description/map/tags/etc to try and reflect a summary of today's discussion. Much appreciated as usual!

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    patrick.vickers1

    • 12/Jan/2016 20:10:15

    Looking at modern day Monkstown through Google Maps I can see a Martello Tower. Is this Seapoint or Williamstown. Surprised to see how small the Tower was.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 12/Jan/2016 20:49:26

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Thanks! You guys are brilliant. The hotel was sandwiched between a sewage tank, railway line, funeral parlour and gas works - not a good rating on TripAdvisor !

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    O Mac

    • 12/Jan/2016 22:08:51

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] Very good :) I remember the hotel. It stood as a ruin for years. [https://www.flickr.com/photos/patvic67] There is a Martello tower at Seapoint and another at Williamstown. Follow the railway towards Dublin and Williamstown is between Blackrock and Booterstown.. near Blackrock College. There's a James Joseph Kennedy, Carriage, Undertaker and Carriage Proprietor living in Blackrock in 1901 census In 1911 Census , now in Monkstown, he gives his occupation as Undertaker and Proprietor Job Carriage.....same as signage. Possibly predecessor to Kennedys garage in DunLaoghaire today?

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    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 13/Jan/2016 19:34:20

    That "Carriage" building is to the side of present-day Esso Filling station. (I fixed punctures there in the 70s). Some of its ruins remain. I understand that the building was the original terminal of the Kingstown railway before its extension over the harbour infill to its current location opposite the Town Hall.

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    Galway Pete

    • 14/Jan/2016 11:32:38

    Looks like it was a lovely spot in its day great great posting.

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    BlueisCoool

    • 16/Jan/2016 22:18:33

    A wonderful black and white image.

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    O Mac

    • 22/Jan/2016 14:56:15

    Public Works (Ireland): fiftieth report 1882/83 mentions the building of a new Bathing place outside the West Pier at Kingstown Harbour in the year 1881. Post 1881

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    O Mac

    • 23/Jan/2016 13:57:55

    The DIA have a record of the Construction of a sewer from Monkstown Station to the tank at DunLaoghaire in 1911 which lowers the upper 1914 date by a few years.

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    Wendy:

    • 05/Aug/2016 08:01:31

    far more decorative than the buildings with tiny flats that replaced it!

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    suckindeesel

    • 07/Nov/2019 21:03:46

    The original Salthill House and grounds was bought by the Dublin & Kingstown Railway in the 1830s and used by Dargan as a residence during the railway's construction. This allowed them a straight run through its grounds into Kingstown instead of a more expensive inland route. It was then converted into a hotel. They also built the baths shown (and Blackrock's) which restored access for sea bathers, a popular pastime for both sexes at the time. The footbridge shown connected to the hotel. The baths were, indeed, segregated, with separate entrances and steps into the water, and a high modesty wall between. It even provided hot baths and showers. However, they declined in popularity following the opening of Kingstown's more elegant Victoria Baths in 1843. They were abandoned around 1870. Following the opening of the railway in 1834 the hotel hosted a bash for an invited group of directors and friends who partied until 4 in the morning.