Keeping up with the Jones's?

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Where: Northern Ireland, Down, United Kingdom

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When: Unknown

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The domestic dwelling to the right of this shot must have felt that nothing they could do would enable them to keep up with the Jones's! The actual title for this was "Large domestic or institutional building possibly hotel 3 storeys, 15-16 bays wide, drive, balustrades, ditto on porch, near sea, wooded hills in background, Co. Down".

We thought that it was the Mournes in the background .... And indeed today's commenters, in particular Niall McAuley, sharon.corbet, and beachcomberaustralia, confirmed that this is the Mourne Hotel (later Great Northern Hotel) in Rostrevor, County Down. Opened in the late 1870s (likely very shortly before this image was taken), the hotel was destroyed during the Troubles in the 1970s.


Photographers: Frederick Holland Mares, James Simonton

Contributor: John Fortune Lawrence

Collection: Stereo Pairs Photograph Collection

Date: Circa 1860 (or 1870?)

NLI Ref: STP_2124

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 21264
lawrencecollection stereographicnegatives jamessimonton frederickhollandmares johnfortunelawrence williammervynlawrence nationallibraryofireland ulster rostrevor greatnorthernhotel mournehotel monkeypuzzle araucariaaraucana stereopairsphotographcollection stereopairs

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  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 14/Jan/2016 08:51:08

    This looks like a hotel in Rostrevor

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    Niall McAuley

    • 14/Jan/2016 08:52:29

    Rostrevor, County Down

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    Niall McAuley

    • 14/Jan/2016 08:53:29

    Tram Cars, Rostrevor, Co. Down

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    Niall McAuley

    • 14/Jan/2016 08:55:39

    "possibly outside railway station"? No, it's Woodside Skating Rink!

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    Niall McAuley

    • 14/Jan/2016 08:56:02

    Rostrevor

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    sharon.corbet

    • 14/Jan/2016 09:35:18

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] Archiseek calls it the Great Northern Hotel, but originally the Mourne Hotel.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 14/Jan/2016 09:45:13

    Mourne Hotel in the NLI.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 14/Jan/2016 10:12:12

    The Monkey puzzle trees araucaria araucana - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Araucaria_araucana - might help with the relative dating of the various photos. First found in Chile in the 1780s ... ... The origin of the popular English language name 'monkey puzzle' derives from its early cultivation in Britain in about 1850, when the species was still very rare in gardens and not widely known. Sir William Molesworth, the proud owner of a young specimen at Pencarrow garden near Bodmin in Cornwall was showing it to a group of friends, one of them – the noted barrister and Benthamist Charles Austin remarked, "It would puzzle a monkey to climb that". As the species had no existing popular name, first 'monkey puzzler', then 'monkey puzzle' stuck.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 14/Jan/2016 11:33:35

    From https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]'s Archiseeklink : 1876 - Originally known as the Mourne Hotel, it was taken over and extended by the Great Northern Railway in the 1890s. William J. Watson was a local architect

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 14/Jan/2016 11:34:24

    An initial date range is 1876-1883 (from archiseek and the STP date range). The tramway opened in 1877.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 14/Jan/2016 11:43:49

    From the DIA 1875-76 Nature: New hotel on site formerly occupied by Old Quay Hotel Domestic Gothic. 150 frontage to Carlingford Lough. Centre one storey higher than wings. Centre roof 'towers up in a most pleasing manner' and will comprise 'a kind of promenade'. FS laid 3 Apr 1875. Approaching completion, Apr 1876. Contractor: Alexander Wheelan, Newry. Proprietors Mssrs. Norton and Shaw.(mr Shaw has purchased Oakwood House and intends erecting gasworks and Turkish bath in connection with hotel.)

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 14/Jan/2016 11:45:55

    To me, the hotel looks pretty fresh in this one - I think it is near the early end of that range. Trees are small, too.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 14/Jan/2016 11:56:33

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] I think you may be right. There does not seem to be any sign of the 1877 tramway lines on the megazoom, but a fair amount of evidence of horse - ie the photo is not blurred out there. It was the first tramway in Ireland according to en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warrenpoint_and_Rostrevor_Tramway

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 14/Jan/2016 13:15:01

    Thanks [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] and all. Have updated the map for now. Will update the description/etc later. In the meantime, for those disappointed by the fact that the hotel is now gone, and hence hankering for their daily "fix" traversing StreetView, perhaps Google's intriguing 1916 StreetView Tour of Dublin will help ease the itch. This particularly Mary found it interesting anyway....

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    Ray Mallon1

    • 14/Jan/2016 23:13:13

    Recognized it right away The Great Northern Hotel Shore road Rostrevor co Down it was a beautiful hotel,above the revolving doors on the inside was a model of the hotel sadly burnt down by the IRA during the troubles spent some time in it a long time ago

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 15/Jan/2016 02:00:08

    thought it looked somewhat railroad-y. railroad hotel for sure

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    AirphixTwin

    • 07/Mar/2016 18:20:14

    In the background: 1942 www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/11338376754/in/photol...

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 08/Mar/2016 06:00:39

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Thanks for sharing. Mary