Major General Ennis (with Thompson gun) and Comdt. McCreagh or McCrea

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Where: Cork, Ireland

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When: 01 January 1922

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Today and tomorrow we've got two related Hogan photos from the civil war's "Battle for Cork" (July-August 1922).

The first was labelled in the catalogue as "Major General Ennis (with Thompson gun) and Comdt. McCreagh disembarking from the Lady Wicklow at Passage West", and shows two senior military men who seem somewhat relaxed given what's coming in the days ahead. While we have met General Tom Ennis before and also visited Passage West before, perhaps there's more to find out about a man who looks like he was possibly a "hands-on" officer...

STOP PRESS - This is not the Lady Wicklow at Passage West, it seems that it is the London & North Western Railway Company's Dublin/Holyhead ferry S.S. Arvonia at Albert / Victoria Quay, Cork City. This news comes from the intrepid O Mac who guarantees the accuracy of this new information. Owen also suggests that the man on the right is most likely Patrick McCrea rather than McCreagh as per our title.

We now need to review some of the Hogan Civil war photos and decide on the accuracy of the original descriptions.

Photographer: W. D. Hogan

Collection: Hogan-Wilson Collection

Date: 1922

NLI Ref: HOGW 96

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 25223
hogancollection hoganwilsoncollection irishcivilwar passagewest ssladywicklow countycork tommygun thompsonsubmachinegun londonnorthwesternrailwaycompany dublinholyheadferry ssarvonia albertquay victoriaquay corkcity cocork munster ireland nationallibraryofireland kennedyquay possiblecataloguecorrection williamdavidhogan wdhogan

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  • profile

    Gillfoto

    • 08/Oct/2015 00:29:47

    Now I'm no Gun expert but the handgun and holster has caught my eye. Firstly unusual length for holster to hang from belt what was the reason for this? Secondly the pistol handgrip has the shape of the Mauser C-96 and if so I this indicates German purchase?

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    Canadian Son

    • 08/Oct/2015 01:32:19

    Nice capture.

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 08/Oct/2015 02:47:25

    sure looks like a broomhandle Mauser. There was one on here a while ago, long time ago, we also found it based on the handle. They made millions of these, pretty common during WW1. Could go full auto, a bad boy. I imagine there were a few floating around post-war. www.spike.com/video-clips/n2wj7z/deadliest_warrior-weapon... Thompson has the circular magazine, 50 rounds I think. Chicago Piano we called them over here.

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 08/Oct/2015 02:53:59

    Here, Mauser on full auto. youtu.be/4M2ynh8CdE4

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    O Mac

    • 08/Oct/2015 05:44:15

    Not the SS Lady Wicklow and not taken at Passage West. This is the London & North Western Railway Company's Dublin/Holyhead ferry S.S. Arvonia at Albert Quay, Cork. She was requisitioned as a troopship in Aug 1922 by the irish Free State and later used as an internment ship..... taken sometime after General Dalton landed 456 men at Passage West on August 8th. catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000280472

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    secret vest

    • 08/Oct/2015 09:29:57

    Great shot ...

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 08/Oct/2015 09:44:49

    Thanks [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]]. We have obviously come across the Arvonia at least twice before, and I don't doubt your track-record in these things, but what is it specifically that gives us pause that this may be neither the SS Wicklow nor Passage West?

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    O Mac

    • 08/Oct/2015 10:24:10

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland].. Only two ship were sent to Cork so it's a case of if it's not one it has to be the other. The Lady Wicklow was a smaller vessel and did not have the deck cover or layout as we see above. Or... you will also notice a white line on the gunnel that is not evident on the Lady Wicklow. The wharf at Passage was alongside The Queenstown Drydocks and Shipbuilding company's sheds where the quayside was littered with the paraphernalia of that business..bollards, trackside crane and tracks etc..... Also..the quay deck boards at Passage West ran the opposite direction to those above and in the same direction as we see HERE ( which is also misnamed ) or in THIS ONE where we see the same Rolls Royce with the same dinted mudguard. www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/21409721143/in/datepos...

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    O Mac

    • 08/Oct/2015 11:00:27

    25" OSI (June 1899) And a lovely red setter has been there since.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 08/Oct/2015 14:01:04

    Thanks https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]. Your reasoning seems fairly solid to me. The image we had planned for tomorrow may help flesh-out the picture, and we can decide whether the description needs an update....

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    guliolopez

    • 08/Oct/2015 14:23:25

    General Tom Ennis (the man with the Tommy gun) was certainly a "hands on" officer. A member of the Volunteers from 1913 (family blog), he took part in the 1916 Rising, and later was involved with the Dublin activities of 'The Squad' (bureauofmilitaryhistory) during the War of Independence. He lead the 1921 attack on the Custom House (wikipedia), and was one of the first through the gates of Portobello/Cathal Brugha Barracks (cathal brugha visitor centre) for the handover after the truce in 1922. He took the pro-treaty side (obviously) in the ensuing civil war. So, it's no surprise to see him armed in this photo - it probably wasn't just for effect or a photo op.... (His brother was Peter Ennis. Commander of the Irish Republican Police. And later of the newly formed CID (wikipedia).)

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    O Mac

    • 08/Oct/2015 16:32:52

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Looking forward to tomorrows flesh-outing. .... I've noticed that a lot of the Hogan civil war pictures have erroneous locations and titles. I wonder was this done deliberately to confuse and for propaganga purposes at the time or were mistakes made when being catalogued later. No question but it's the Arvonia along side Albert/Victoria Quay..

  • profile

    Photoamble.

    • 08/Oct/2015 17:38:58

    I am reliably informed by one who trained with a Thomson that it was very difficult to hold steady as it tended to pull high .

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    guliolopez

    • 08/Oct/2015 20:46:53

    If this is the Arvonia rather than the Lady Wicklow (and the physical features which [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] highlights would seem to suggest against the Lady Wicklow), then we have indeed seen her before. Not least below when we saw her carrying the "Four Courts" 18 pounder gun that was involved in the Battle of Cork. Possibly the most dramatic of the ensuring engagements in which the 18 pounder was used was at Old Court above Rochestown. As captured by Dr. James Lynch, a local doctor (first hand account) who was called-out to tend the dying. In all 9 pro-treaty and 7 anti-treaty combatants were killed in the woods around Old Court (cork examiner)... www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/8517245863/

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    O Mac

    • 10/Oct/2015 01:06:19

    Looks like Comdt McCreagh may be a misspelling of a Col Comdt. Patrick McCrea who was Transport Officer with the 2nd Battl Dublin Brigade. He was also a friend of Emmet Dalton who was in charge of the taking of Cork. www.militaria-archive.com/independence/vb-scrapb2/content... antoglach.militaryarchives.ie/PDF/1922_03_31_Vol_III_No_4... www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/21874001780/in/datepos...

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    eyelightfilms

    • 10/Oct/2015 20:15:45

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I have been up close to a Thompson firing in an enclosed space. Firing full load blanks on a film set. Gangster film set in the 1920's. Never so close to anything so loud, and with shells flying out everywhere and banging off the walls.

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    tomais1

    • 13/Sep/2019 14:31:25

    The first was labelled in the catalogue as "Major General Ennis (with Thompson gun) and Comdt. McCreagh disembarking from the Lady Wicklow at Passage West", and shows two senior military men who seem somewhat relaxed given what's coming in the days ahead. While we have met General Tom Ennis before and also visited Passage West before, perhaps there's more to find out about a man who looks like he was possibly a "hands-on" officer... Pat McCrea is in that photo with Ennis .....he's at the right back row.