St. Patrick, vessel, at Rosslare Harbour, Co. Wexford

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Where: Wexford, Ireland

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When: 01 January 1910

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Welcome to a new week and a new set of NLI photographs for your attention. Today we start with a shot from the Mason Collection showing a ship moored at Rosslare Harbour.

Following input from B-59 (on the dates for the ship's service) and Sean (on the dates for the pier construction), we've updated our range to a likely 1906-1910. Thanks also to beachcomberaustralia, John Spooner, and O Mac for the extra background on the vessel, the route it serviced, and what happened to it later in its life. (Including its time as a "hospital ship" during the Great War). Sharon stirred-things-up by pointing out that this image is attributed in our catalogue to two photography studios: both Mason and Lawrence. But for now we'll assume there was nothing nefarious afoot :)


Contributor: Thomas H. Mason

Collection: Mason Photographic Collection

Date: ca. 1890-1910 (but likely after 1906)

NLI Ref: M22/47/4

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 69393
thomasholmesmason thomasmayne thomashmasonandsonslimited lanternslides nationallibraryofireland rosslare countywexford rosslareharbour saintpatrickship hospitalship crane stpatrick

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    B-59

    • 21/Sep/2015 07:48:33

    Must be this ship, launched in1906: - www.clydeships.co.uk/view.php?ref=3247 - www.roll-of-honour.com/Ships/HMHSStPatrick.html

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    Swordscookie

    • 21/Sep/2015 08:12:10

    The whole thing must have been very new, ship, pier etc. You can almost see the shiny newness to it all!

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    Swordscookie

    • 21/Sep/2015 08:15:44

    Yes, built in 1906 according to Wikipedia: "The village of Rosslare Harbour (Irish: Calafort Ros Láir, meaning "harbour of the middle peninsula") (Yola: Rosslaarè) grew up to serve the needs of the harbour of the same name (now called Rosslare Europort), first developed in 1906 by the Great Western Railway and the Great Southern and Western Railway to accommodate steamferry traffic between Great Britain and Ireland. Rosslare Harbour railway station opened on 30 August 1906".1 The original village was called Ballygeary and Wiki says: "The village of Ballygeary was divided into two townslands, one known as tin town and the other as straw town. It is believed this was because of the roofs on the houses."

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 21/Sep/2015 08:46:02

    There is a painting of the 'St Patrick' as a WW1 hospital ship - gilbertswar.blogspot.com.au/2013/05/hmhs-st-patrick.html

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 21/Sep/2015 08:56:37

    ... and one of her sister ships, 'St George' (thanks to NLI's megazoom) - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000537983

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 21/Sep/2015 09:23:49

    1908 description of a trip on the 'St Patrick' from a visiting Australian

    The run across from Fishguard to Rosslare - a distance of nearly 60 miles - takes less than three hours. I have seen a P and O liner making up time, and thought it was fast sea travelling but never in my previous experience did I see such an ocean greyhound as the graceful little Irish Channel steamer, St. Patrick. It had a grand old name, it was a grand new boat and it landed us safely on the shores of dear old Ireland almost as quickly as if the Great Western train had been able to continue its journey right across the Channel. I am aware that the nautical gender of a boat is feminine, but you can't very well call St Patrick she -- and in any case it was a mail boat. ...
    Freeman's Journal (Sydney Australia) 24/9/1908 p.41 - trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/111281200

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    O Mac

    • 21/Sep/2015 09:27:35

    The other side.

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    John Spooner

    • 21/Sep/2015 10:06:15

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie Can we trust wikipedia on that 1906 date for the completion of the harbour? From an article entitled "Antiquarians in Wexford" in Freeman's Journal, Thursday, September 12, 1895:

    A run of half an hour by train took the party to the pier of Ballygeary, where the works in progress for the station of Ireland's new cross-channel service are rapidly approaching completion. The connection with England, which will be known a the "Fishguard and Rosslare Line," enables the Welsh coast to be reached in two hours and twenty minutes. Being shown over the entire buildings and arrangements by the courteous representative of the company ...
    or did it actually take 11 years for them to actually achieve completion?

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    O Mac

    • 21/Sep/2015 10:13:42

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] That's odd ! The 25" OSI historic map of Rosslare was last surveyed in June 1903 and shows the new harbour " In course of construction" maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V2,713469,612493,11,9 www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/21602694131/in/datepos...

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    John Spooner

    • 21/Sep/2015 11:34:21

    It seems the 1906 harbour was a big extension of the much smaller 1895 one. The Standard (London), Friday, November 17, 1899 has a lengthy Notice that an application was to be made to parliament in 1900 to empower the Fishguard and Rosslare harbours and Railway Company to carry out work at Rosslare, including

    An extension for a distance of 337 yards or thereabouts in a north by westerly direction of the existing pier or breakwater authorised by the Rosslare Harbour Order 1869.
    and
    all necessary approach roads jetties piers wharves quays rails sidings sheds buildings warehouses cranes tips machinery mooring and other buoys beacons electric and other lights water pipes works and conveniences all which harbour embankment road and works are hereinafter referred to as "the intended harbour works"
    and so on for over of a column of small print with plenty more hereinafters and wherefores and very little punctuation. It looks as if the new facilities in 1895 weren't enough to cope with increased passengers and freight (and the resulting bigger ships), and a much bigger better harbour was deemed necessary only 4 years later.

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    John Spooner

    • 21/Sep/2015 12:09:17

    Someone who was against the bill to develop Rosslare Harbour was our old friend W G D Goff (if indeed it is him - the last comment on the Goff picture casts come doubt) February 22, 1902 It seems Waterford didn't like the competition. Western Mail (Cardiff), Wednesday, February 28, 1900

    A petition has been deposited in the Private Bill Office of the House of Lords on behalf of the Waterford harbour Commissioners and W.G.D. Goff and G. Nolan praying to be heard by counsel against the above Bill on the Committee stage being reached.
    To quote myself 4 years ago commenting on the Goff picture
    Another vague possibility: In 1899 and 1900 (and probably after that), the Bristol Mercury regularly carried advertisements for the Waterford Steamship Company. They provided a passenger service between Waterford and Bristol (nine sailings a month in each direction - fares: cabin 15s,return 25s, children and servants travelling with families 10s, deck 7s 6d, children 4s).
    ... which turned out to be a complete red herring, but they correctly foresaw that the Waterford-Bristol would be badly hit by the big new Rosslare-Fishguard ferry and connecting train services.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 21/Sep/2015 13:12:01

    Hey, plagiarism! This is actually a Lawrence shot!

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    sharon.corbet

    • 21/Sep/2015 13:18:50

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] This may be the 1895 harbour, compared to the 1906 version. (Of course by 1990 it looks completely different...)

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    sharon.corbet

    • 21/Sep/2015 14:37:07

    The Enniscorthy Guardian had an article back in 2006 about the 100th Anniversary of the Rosslare-Fishguard Route: "The official opening was held on August 30, 1906, when the three 'mail boats' - the St. Patrick, St. David and St. George went into service. The St. Patrick sailed from Rosslare and the St. David sailed from Fishguard..." "...It is also interesting to note, in the early days of the service, there was a time difference between Wales and Ireland."

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 21/Sep/2015 15:12:14

    Thanks https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] for pointing that out. The scandal :) In seriousness, it might be interesting to find out if the confusion over authorship is down to a cataloguing issue - or genuinely that the image appears in the body-of-work of both studios. (Mason and Lawrence/French). It's also possible though that either studio made a copy of the other's work. (As we often see in the Poole collection, where Poole's studio was asked to make copies of another photographer's image). Until we get to the bottom of it, and while the catalogue records Mason as "author" (rather than explicit "photographer"), for now we've updated this Flickr listing to use the more neutral "contributor"...

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 21/Sep/2015 21:30:16

    Whoeverdunnit, it is a wonderful photo with a great use of perspectives ... I think the photographer was on that lighthouse at the end of the pier. But I have had a sleepless night worrying about that steam crane - it looks way too bulky for its location, and is going to knock the ship's rigging and funnels, and the glass lamps on the pier. Eeek!

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    Niall McAuley

    • 22/Sep/2015 08:05:05

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Definitely a Lawrence shot - the caption on the plate ends in 4451 W.L. for William Lawrence (as does the copy catalogued in the Lawrence collection Sharon links).

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 22/Sep/2015 21:48:53

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Eeek again! 43,922 views in two days. Not that I am counting ...

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 23/Sep/2015 06:19:17

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia This photo was selected by the famous Flickr Explore yesterday. The views do rack up quickly when that happens. It transpires that the photo was then dropped by explore late yesterday (I, think because it has a frame?). The Sorrento Terrace shot is in Explore today you will see views of that photo increase dramatically as the day progresses.. Mary

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    John Spooner

    • 24/Sep/2015 07:33:01

    St Patrick foils the Luftwaffe I know that it's a different St Patrick, being the successor to the one pictured, but this may be of interest. Derry Journal, August 21, 1940. StPatric1940

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 13/Oct/2015 17:42:12

    I have just added this photo to our 50,000+ Views Album https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/sets/72157651136879037