Ridge Pool, Ballina, Co. Mayo

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Where: Mayo, Ireland

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King Street, Ballina, Co. Mayo

Not King Street Ballina Co. Mayo, nor King Street, Ballina, New South Wales, this is a view overlooking the famous Ridge Pool and the old fish traps on the River Moy.

The Ballina salmon weir has stood at the mouth of the
River Moy, Ireland’s most prolific salmon river, for over
300 years. Originally built in the 16th Century, the weir
has functioned since that time as a means of harvesting
salmon that were channelled into one of its nine holding
boxes as they made their way upstream to spawn. In
these more enlightened times, all commercial
exploitation of salmon on the River Moy has ceased and
the ancient structure of the weir has now been modified
to accommodate a series of electronic fish counters
whose function is to provide valuable information on
salmon stocks which will ultimately be used in the
conservation of the species

Photographer: Robert French

Collection: The Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: [between ca. 1865-1914

NLI Ref: L_CAB_01999

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 19175
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio glassnegative nationallibraryofireland ballina comayo connaught ireland rivermoy moyfishery ridgepool fishtraps salmom seatrout footbridge mill tidal weir fishcounters 300years lawrencephotographcollection

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  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 08/May/2015 07:38:44

    It's not really of King St. (now O'Rahilly St. - I did find a King St. in Ballina, NSW though...) I think it was taken from somewhere around here (OSI link). You can see the footbridge above.

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    Swordscookie

    • 08/May/2015 08:08:51

    It seems so unlikely to be a street given the rural surroundings. That looks more like a weir or salmon trap down there than a footbridge. I suspect that the footbridge was a later adaptation of the access!

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 08/May/2015 08:14:13

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie There's both a "footbridge" and a salmon weir marked on the 25" OSI. But it's a bit unclear as to how the footbridge is supposed to work....

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 08/May/2015 08:34:04

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] It is so long since I was in Ballina that I am having difficulty in orienting myself with the photograph! Here is another shot from a different angle. (I don't know how to simplify the link) catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000332634

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 08/May/2015 08:36:36

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] From the bridge to the start of the weir is the famous "Ridge Pool" the most productive salmon pool in the land. I have fished it before. I would think that all the workings we see in the river are to do with Salmon management and commercial fishing.

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    DannyM8

    • 08/May/2015 08:40:45

    The River Moy is tidal up to the Weir and fish traps.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 08/May/2015 08:44:53

    Here's a Google Earth shot. The "King St." Photo is taken from approx. where The Glebe is now, looking over the river.

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 08/May/2015 08:45:08

    The Ballina salmon weir has stood at the mouth of the River Moy, Ireland’s most prolific salmon river, for over 300 years. Originally built in the 16th Century, the weir has functioned since that time as a means of harvesting salmon that were channelled into one of its nine holding boxes as they made their way upstream to spawn. In these more enlightened times, all commercial exploitation of salmon on the River Moy has ceased and the ancient structure of the weir has now been modified to accommodate a series of electronic fish counters whose function is to provide valuable information on salmon stocks which will ultimately be used in the conservation of the species Good Pictures of the weir from the Heritage Council Here

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 08/May/2015 08:47:56

    Here's a closer shot of the fisheries and "footbridge". The wee knoll on the right is from where todays photograph was taken. www.nli.ie/glassplates/L_CAB/L_CAB_07464.jpg

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    Swordscookie

    • 08/May/2015 08:54:17

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] That looks right Sharon, it makes more sense now! Nice work Danny, as a child I often watched from the bank as the men went out in boats and caught the salmon in nets. Occasionally they would give us coarse fish they caught as they had no use for them. https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] You forgot to add the link Owen!

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 08/May/2015 08:58:13

    @sharon corbet - Ha! I drove through Ballina, NSW just today - within coo-ee of King Street. It's a small world ...

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 08/May/2015 09:00:10

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] From looking at the OSI, that big building in the Fisheries shot is actually a corn mill. Here's a photo showing the area after the corn mill was demolished.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 08/May/2015 09:01:41

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia I was actually wondering if you might know it, but had decided that would be just too much of a coincidence :-)

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 08/May/2015 09:04:49

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Sharon, Beachcomber knows everything!! :)

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 08/May/2015 09:11:05

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie Up to 1996 or 1997 they were netting the Moy on each tide a little further down stream from here, near the Ash Tree Pool, I saw hundreds caught in one haul, I actually saw one fish of over 30 Lbs caught another time.

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    Frank Fullard

    • 14/May/2015 18:26:09

    Just to clarify things - the Moy is still our most prolific salmon river and while commercial fishing on it has ceased it continues to be immensely popular with anglers. Indeed the ending of the commercial fishery was intended to boost angling activity. The Ridge Pool itself seems to be booked out a year in advance, which gives some indication as to it's particular popularity. However there are lots of other prime fishing spots available along the river; some of which have been developed in recent years, and evening slots are kept open for day visitors. The area surrounding the Ridge Pool has changed considerably over the years since this was taken. There is a new and very beautiful footbridge very close to where this shot was taken from, and, in the middle of this there is a relatively new hotel. I must get some up to date pictures and share them!

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 16/May/2015 10:26:15

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/frankfullard Thanks Frank