Dublin saves Cork

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Where: Cork, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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Dublin and Cork fire brigade appliances.

We were not sure if this photo was for our the Irish War of Independence or the Irish Civil War albums so we did not add it to either. We are no confident to change the date and add this to the Irish war of Independence album thanks to information supplied by Carol Maddock .

She tells us that on Sunday 12th December 1920 a Dublin Fire Brigade contingent were conveyed by the special train to Cork to help with the fires during the Burning of Cork

OwenMacC Tells us that the Dublin vehicle is a Leyland, "In 1909 the Chief Fire Officer of Dublin arrived at the Leyland works and told the astounded company that he had decided that they built the finest petrol truck chassis in the country, and that nothing but the best would be good enough for his proposed new fire engine. Though Leyland protested that they knew nothing of fire engine design, the astute fireman had come armed with his own ideal specification and Leyland agreed to build his engine"

Photographer: W. D. Hogan

Collection: Hogan-Wilson Collection

Date: 12th or 13th December 1920

NLI Ref.: HOGW 143

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 38246
hoganwilsoncollection nationallibraryofireland dublinfiredepartment dublinfirebrigade corkcorporation edinburghhotel 1921 1922 firemen fireengine pumps men onlookers cbp cans bridge cork munster ireland cocork merchantsquay fire brigade camdenplace 12thdecember1920 13thdecember1920 captainmyres leyland burningofcork irishwarofindependence dateestablished williamdavidhogan wdhogan

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 04/May/2015 07:21:44

    ONLY 2 Months and 4 Days to go............ I cant wait for the 8th July, what about you?

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 04/May/2015 08:36:54

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Not entirely sure what is happening on July the eighth, but meanwhile ... May The Fourth Be With You.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 04/May/2015 08:43:45

    Oooo - I found the streetview! - goo.gl/maps/BX6PL

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    sharon.corbet

    • 04/May/2015 08:43:50

    Streetview

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 04/May/2015 08:45:35

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] May the Fourth be with you too! How can you not know..... That on 8th July 2015 we will make our collection of Catholic parish register microfilms freely available online on a dedicated website. These records, which are considered the single most important source of information on Irish family history prior to the 1901 census, consist primarily of baptism and marriage records and date from the 1740s to the 1880s. Click here for more details details

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 04/May/2015 08:57:13

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] That is truly something to look forward to! Anyone know what the motor Fire Engine is? The horse-drawn steam pump at left looks like a Merryweather - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:MerryweatherFireEngine.jpg from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merryweather_%26_Sons

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    Carol Maddock

    • 04/May/2015 09:28:02

    Might this not be from December 1920 - the Burning of Cork? From the Irish Times on Tuesday, 14 December 1920:

    THE DUBLIN FIREMEN The local Fire Brigade has done Herculean work, and during the night the Dublin Fire Brigade contingent rendered splendid support. In conversation to-night with Captain Myers, I was informed that he and his seven men arrived in Cork at about 1 o’clock … brought out their fire engine, which they had had conveyed by the special train on Sunday evening…

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    O Mac

    • 04/May/2015 17:32:06

    The letters on top of the sign !------- "Cork Blackrock and Passage Railway". [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] The Dublin engine is a Leyland "In 1909 the Chief Fire Officer of Dublin arrived at the Leyland works and told the astounded company that he had decided that they built the finest petrol truck chassis in the country, and that nothing but the best would be good enough for his proposed new fire engine. Though Leyland protested that they knew nothing of fire engine design, the astute fireman had come armed with his own ideal specification and Leyland agreed to build his engine" www.bonhams.com/auctions/22201/lot/1208/ www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/4000771834/in/photolis...

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    DannyM8

    • 04/May/2015 18:31:56

    The registration on the Dublin tender looks like RI- 2080, it has to be RI or YI. RI 1 to RI 99996 (Dec 1903 – Apr 1921); YI 1 to YI 9999 (Apr 1921 – Mar 1927);

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    DannyM8

    • 04/May/2015 18:42:41

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] This photo ( a heavily edited copy) of this photo is used in the Cork Fire Brigade site - entitled, Dublin and Cork F. B's during the 'Burnking of Cork" December 1920 CLick here and move down page So, [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] you may be right!!

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    O Mac

    • 04/May/2015 19:12:39

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] I'm no expert but it looks like the radiator badge changed from the oval plate seen above to the simple "Leyland" name badge around 1913. Which would make your letters RI-20?? www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/17184740829/

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    Carol Maddock

    • 04/May/2015 19:45:13

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] What's seldom is wonderful!

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    guliolopez

    • 04/May/2015 19:56:20

    Hi all. ('Sme). I don't have much to offer at this point. RE: Location - [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] & [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] have this correct. Hogan is on Merchant's Quay looking over Patrick's Bridge to Patrick's Quay and Camden Pl (and Bridge Street) RE: Subject - I'll let those more familiar with fire appliances duke this out (although would note that the Cork FB have their own gallery with some contemporary equipment. What I can add is that, as [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] notes, the hut on the left (with the letters in reverse) is from the Cork Blackrock & Passage Railway. They operated steamers from this point on Merchant's Quay (and then later from Kennedy Quay) to Aghada, Cobh and other points in the lower harbour. RE: Date - I am loathe to disagree with [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]], especially as I'm just going on a gut feel, but I think this is sometime after "the Burning". (Hogan was around for the aftermath certainly in late 1920, but he was in Cork several times in 1921 and 1922, and I wonder whether this is a separate event). I don't really know why I think this isn't Dec 1920 though - So I'm going to have to think about it.... [RECANTED] Carol most likely (as usual) correct - very likely that the Dublin FB appliance shown was the one specifically put on a train and sent down by the DFB (along with 7 men) to assist after the fire. Along with their travelling counterparts from Dublin, Waterford, and Limerick, the papers of the day lauded the fire brigades in Cork for effectively saving the city!

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    guliolopez

    • 04/May/2015 20:27:01

    PS - Must've been a big fire whatever the case. Look at the stack of spent fuel cans used to pump water from the river. PPS - Roll on 8 July!! PPPS - The Cork Corpo appliance on the left doesn't look too different from a similar appliance captured by Mitchell and Kenyon 20 years earlier

  • profile

    Carol Maddock

    • 04/May/2015 20:39:56

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] You're making me doubt myself, especially as you're our resident Cork expert and military expert for this time period, and I have the greatest respect for your gut feelings! December is not off the table clothes-wise. All men of this era would have coats and caps on, but there are scarves too. That's all a bit tenuous, I know. However, I went on reading about Captain Myers and the men of Dublin Fire Brigade today in the Irish Times and all of their fire fighting exploits in Dublin during 1921 and 1922. They were busy to say the least, and would have needed every one of their fire engines. They went to Cork in December 1920 because of the exceptional circumstances, but I didn't see any other mention of another trip. As usual, more than willing to be convinced otherwise...

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    guliolopez

    • 04/May/2015 20:51:06

    Hey https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]. To be honest I was on the verge of a recant. Like yourself, I can find no reference to any other occasion in the period where the Dublin Brigade made a trip down. The "call to pumps" (involving brigades from Cork, Dublin, Limerick and Waterford) was described in the Freeman's Journal as "unique in the history of fire fighting", so I think you were correct - and my gut (granted not feeling its best today) is probably "off". I think we can put this as December 1920. (A special train was put on to bring 7 men and that appliance down to Cork - I can't imagine that happened again or too often).... Freeman's Journal 16 Dec 1920: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/17184151548/ A quote from "your" Captain Myer's brings it home - Independent 14 Dec 1920: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/16749532154/

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    Carol Maddock

    • 04/May/2015 21:27:29

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Excellent - wielding the Flickr bell for Date Established in reckless fashion - ding ding ding! (Unless, of course, some else knows different) P.S. In the midst of all the harrowing fires, couldn't help laughing at the fact that many of the articles in the Irish Times were immediately followed by adverts for "Insurance at low rates with Phoenix Assurance" of Trinity Street, Dublin...

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    O Mac

    • 05/May/2015 19:11:46

    According to Las Fallon of the Dublin Fire Brigade, engine # RI 2080 was delivered in 1913 and was the second motorized fire engine in Dublin. It was based at Thomas Steet Fire Station. Our man with the fancy buttons----the driver---- and his engine can be seen here too. youtu.be/-Pnh5D4ZpmQ?t=1m27s Las Fallon also explains why it was called the Dublin Fire Department as named on the truck above and not Dublin Fire Brigade. Well done StorymapDublin.

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    Kanagaratnam

    • 12/Jun/2015 13:09:54

    Wonderful work!

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    indian59

    • 20/May/2016 22:56:24

    Las Fallon identified the same tender in this image taken c.July 1922,after the siege of the Four courts. www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10209049435494009&set...

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 21/May/2016 21:52:59

    Very interesting - Thanks for sharing https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]