St Saviour's Church and the Tait Memorial Clock in Limerick

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Where: Limerick, Ireland

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When: 01 January 1870

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sharon.corbet had the location identified within minutes. This is St Saviour's Church and The Tait Memorial clock in Limerick.

The Clock was first erected in 1867, it commemorates Sir Peter Tait who was mayor of Limerick from 1866 to 1868. Taits Clock is located in Bakers place across from the Dominican Cathedral. The architect of the clock was Charles Corbett. Though Sharon Corbet points out "Both the NIAH and the DIA claim that it was William Edward rather than Charles Corbett who designed the clock."

Niall McAuley narrowed the date from its original 1860-1883 to between 1867 (or later) and 1870 (or earlier); quite a narrow date range for the stereo pair collection.

John Spooner and DannyM8 are not sure if the two faces of the clock are telling different times. If they are it could narrow the date range by a year or so:

The clock was damaged in a serious disturbance, probably during the elections in late 1868, but definitely before January 1869, when the ensuing enquiry took place, and it still wasn't working in August 1869 when the Corporation of Limerick invited tenders for its repair.

From info in the Limerick Reporter.



Photographers: Frederick Holland Mares, James Simonton

Contributor: John Fortune Lawrence

Collection: The Stereo Pairs Photograph Collection

Date: 1867 - 1870

NLI Ref: STP_1617

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 28158
lawrencecollection stereographicnegatives jamessimonton frederickhollandmares johnfortunelawrence williammervynlawrence nationallibraryofireland tait memorial limerick clock taitmemorialclock limerickmunster ireland sirpetertait mayor bakerplace glentworthstreet confederategovernment americancivilwar uniforms caps stsaviourschurch locationidentified stereopairsphotographcollection stereopairs

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  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 04/Mar/2015 08:36:40

    That's the Tait Memorial Clock, Baker Place in Limerick. Plus St. Saviour's Church.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 04/Mar/2015 08:43:15

    The clock is from 1867, per the NIAH..

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    sharon.corbet

    • 04/Mar/2015 08:46:27

    OSI Map of the square.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 04/Mar/2015 08:51:34

    Per Sharon's NIAH link for the church, the roof was raised in the 1860s, and the rose window is new. You can see the cleaner stone towards the top.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 04/Mar/2015 08:53:09

    Stil a lot of planks and rubble about, I'd say the alterations are just finishing.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 04/Mar/2015 08:57:04

    From the DIA: Name: GOLDIE & CHILD # Building: CO. LIMERICK, LIMERICK, BAKER'S PLACE, CHURCH OF ST SAVIOUR (RC, DOMINICAN) Date: 1870 Nature: Reopened 13 Nov 1870. Totally remodelled inside and out. Work survised by M.A. Hennessy, CE, Limerick. Builder: McCarthy & Guerin. Refs: IB 12, 15 Dec 1870, 300,301(illus.)

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 04/Mar/2015 09:07:44

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley I would agree Niall it must be close to the reopen date you mention.

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    B-59

    • 04/Mar/2015 09:52:22

    Street view 2014: www.google.com/maps/@52.65994,-8.627589,3a,75y,62.08h,102...

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    derangedlemur

    • 04/Mar/2015 09:54:08

    Damnit. Late again! We turned this one up a couple of dozen times looking for Downpatrick the other day.

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    DannyM8

    • 04/Mar/2015 10:03:29

    First erected in 1867, Taits clock commemorates Sir Peter Tait who was mayor of Limerick from 1866 to 1868. Taits Clock is located in Bakers place across from a dominican Cathedral. The architect of the clock was Charles Corbett. Tait is a story of rags to to riches to near rags again, in Limerick, London, Shetland and Russia. He actually supplied uniforms to the Confederate government during the American Civil War!! See wiki.csisdmz.ul.ie/wiki/Tait%E2%80%99s_Clock

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 04/Mar/2015 10:45:57

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] He did indeed make uniforms for many military formations and continued to do so right up to the '70's. The Tait factory was situated approx. one half mile from the clock on Edward Street beside the RIC/Garda station. They made British army uniforms for many years after Independence. Down to the right of St. Saviours was the old Mattersons factory where the famous Limerick ham was cured, peas and beans were canned and many Limerick people found employment. There was also a notorious shebeen whose name escapes me now where late nights were more the norm than early closing. The local justice had a soft spot for the old lady who ran the place and kept her licence going long after it should have been cancelled!

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    Niall McAuley

    • 04/Mar/2015 11:08:01

    Clothing Factory on the GeoHive OSI 25" map.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 04/Mar/2015 11:16:52

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] The porch hasn't been added yet, though it's there in this Lawrence Collection shot. I can't find any sign of the porch being added later, separate to the alterations in the 1860s.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 04/Mar/2015 11:36:15

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Well spotted - so the alterations are not finished - earlier then 1870, and the Clock is in place - 1867 or later. Tighter than the date range we can usually get on these!

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    John Spooner

    • 04/Mar/2015 12:49:03

    "Sweet harmonious tones." How the Limerick Reporter described the new clock on 15th February 1867

    THE TAIT TESTIMONIAL The Tait Testimonial, erected by public subscription, in honour of the Mayor, is a beautiful addition to the public buildings of Limerick, now being complete, and is universally admitted to reflect the greatest credit on Messrs, Corbett and Connolly, the architect and contractor, as well as on Mr Wallace, the constructor of the clock. When the scaffolding is removed, this very handsome memorial will look to still greater advantage; and will not merely be a highly ornamental object, but extremely useful to the public. The Clock, which chimes the quarters in sweet, harmonious tones, has four bells. It can be heard, when striking, at a great distance, and can be seen far and wide when highlighted at night, the red letters of the four illuminated dials forming a conspicuous object in the transparency.

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    DannyM8

    • 04/Mar/2015 14:32:39

    It looks like the time is different on both of the faces we can see!

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    John Spooner

    • 04/Mar/2015 16:26:25

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] If so (I wasn't sure), it could be a dating clue. The clock was damaged in a serious disturbance, probably during the elections in late 1868, but definitely before January 1869, when the ensuing enquiry took place, and it still wasn't working in August 1869 when the Corporation of Limerick invited tenders for its repair. From info in the Limerick Reporter.

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 04/Mar/2015 17:04:51

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner That would tie in well with https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley dating above.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 05/Mar/2015 08:37:06

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Both the NIAH and the DIA claim that it was William Edward rather than Charles Corbett who designed the clock.

  • profile