Corry - Obelisk, Newry, County Down

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Where: Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

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Triangular green, railed, with square tapered column inscribed Corry on 6-step base, 2-storey public buildings 3-storey terraced streets, in background wooded hills in far background.

It fascinates me that an old photo like this one can raise so many interesting stories. Such as, a duel in the Irish parliament involving Henry Grattan, water fountains in Newry, Dun Laoghaire and Australia and a Baron to the Throne of Poland in the reign of King Stanislaw August Poniatowski.

It is worth reading all the comments and the associated link.

Our thanks to all of today's contributors:

derangedlemur
sharon.corbet
beachcomberaustralia
OwenMacC
pellethepoet and
John Spooner


Photographers: Frederick Holland Mares, James Simonton

Contributor: John Fortune Lawrence

Collection: The Stereo Pairs Photograph Collection

Date: 1872-1883

NLI Ref: STP_2143

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 25142
lawrencecollection stereographicnegatives jamessimonton frederickhollandmares johnfortunelawrence williammervynlawrence nationallibraryofireland corry obelisk monument ireland newry codown ulster northernireland trevorcorry henrygrattansirisaaccorry drinkingfountain waltermcfarlaneco corryarms barontothethroneofpoland 1839 thomasjduff july22nd1838 stmarysnewry actofunion strumpetcity waltermacfarlanecos no8castironcanopydrinkingfountain kingstanislawaugustponiatowski chancelloroftheirishexchequer oxforddictionaryofnationalbiography derrymore sirtrevorcorry edwardcorry stereopairsphotographcollection stereopairs

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  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 02/Apr/2015 06:58:43

    To help with our ongoing photo selection for this stream we would welcome any views you have on the subject. Which types do you like or dislike? All comments welcome. Mary

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    derangedlemur

    • 02/Apr/2015 07:08:30

    Unknown locations for me, thanks.

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 02/Apr/2015 07:09:02

    It's in Newry. Streetview

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    derangedlemur

    • 02/Apr/2015 07:10:52

    This one reminds me of Warrenpoint or somewhere round that neck of the woods.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 02/Apr/2015 07:13:24

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I think you have it. I see from your streetview that the obelisk is in Corry park.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 02/Apr/2015 07:15:28

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] It turned up earlier apparently: www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/7226524512/ (Just visible in the background.)

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    sharon.corbet

    • 02/Apr/2015 07:21:49

    The Newry Heritage Trail claims that "obelisk was erected in 1877, in memory of Trevor Corry, a magistrate in the town for 35 years, and reflects a fashionable, mid-19th century interest in ancient Egypt".

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    derangedlemur

    • 02/Apr/2015 07:22:20

    Wasting 5 minutes looking in Rostrevor for it slows you down.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 02/Apr/2015 07:24:08

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Very funny.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 02/Apr/2015 07:24:34

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Whereas googling "corry monument ireland" gives it to you straight away. (Followed by the realisation that I actually saw it last month...)

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    derangedlemur

    • 02/Apr/2015 07:26:04

    Googling! What sort of sportsperson are you?

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    derangedlemur

    • 02/Apr/2015 07:28:25

    "The Corry family is represented including Sir Trevor, Baron of Poland, who died in 1781 leaving £3,000 to the poor of Newry. He also left £1,000 for the building of St. Marys." Which would explain why it's at the top of Trevor Hill.

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    derangedlemur

    • 02/Apr/2015 07:29:15

    "This obelisk was erected in 1877, in memory of Trevor Corry, a magistrate in the town for 35 years, and reflects a fashionable, mid 19th century interest in ancient Egypt. The Corry family had considerable commercial and political influence in Newry over several generations. Trevor’s cousin, Isaac Corry (1755 - 1815) was elected to the Irish Parliament in 1776 and was the last Chancellor of that body. In his house at Derrymore (one mile west of Newry) the Act of Union was prepared and he led the parliamentary debate in favour of union. When the Act was passed, he sat at Westminster as the MP for Newry and Chancellor of the Irish Exchequer. Reputedly he became so unpopular that he built a new road directly from his home to the Dublin Road to avoid the town and the wrath of Newry’s citizens. It is still called the Chancellor’s Road. Despite his support for Catholic emancipation, he lost his seat in 1806."

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 02/Apr/2015 07:29:56

    Not pictured: The Corry monument - maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V1,708749,826850,7,7

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    sharon.corbet

    • 02/Apr/2015 07:31:30

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] He has a pretty big wikipedia page - "Corry was given the title "Baron to the Throne of Poland" on 20 October 1773 by the King of Poland, Stanislaw August Poniatowski"

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    sharon.corbet

    • 02/Apr/2015 07:35:27

    Though I'm a bit confused as to how he was a "magistrate in the town for 35 years" though he seemed to spend most of his time in Gdańsk.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 02/Apr/2015 07:42:23

    The DIA claims 1839, designed by Thomas J. Duff.

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    derangedlemur

    • 02/Apr/2015 07:42:55

    Probably a tax exile.

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 02/Apr/2015 07:58:57

    Whereas the 1983 Conservation Plan claims "Corry Monument (1839) Pedimented die and obelisk on six granite steps surrounded by formal garden Commemorates Trevor Corry who was a serving magistrate in Newry for thirty-five years." It seems there were two Trevor Corrys - one who went off to Poland and had various adventures, and another who was a magistrate and Deputy-lieutenant of Down in Newry. The magistrate died on July 22 1838 (according to the Annual Register), and it's him that is commemorated by the monument.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 02/Apr/2015 08:12:59

    So which is the correct date? 1839 or 1877? The 6" was surveyed in 1834, so that tells us nothing.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 02/Apr/2015 08:21:44

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] I'm inclined to go for 1839 - directly after Trevor Corry the magistrate died. Actually, the Ulster Street Directory of 1861 mentions: " The Northern entrance of the town is adorned with a chaste and elegant obelisk of chiselled granite, erected in honour of the late highly respected and generally lamented Trevor Corry, Esq., a favourite magistrate for many years. The Corry Arms, beautifully executed on Portland stone, appear on the North and South recesses, and eulogistic inscriptions on black marble are executed on the West and East sides of the monument. " So it must be 1839.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 02/Apr/2015 08:55:27

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] The Obelisk looks to be well aged in this photo, whereas the park surrounds and planting seem to be relatively new, does that help? Any idea what that thing at the apex of the park is?

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 02/Apr/2015 09:15:58

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] I think it may be a drinking fountain. (Looks like a mini-version of the one in Dun Laoghaire to me.) It's gone in this Eason shot though.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 02/Apr/2015 09:39:39

    Drinking fountain is very like this one in Bathurst, NSW, which pellethepoet [https://www.flickr.com/photos/pellethepoet/] worked out is from Walter Macfarlane & Co, a prominent Scottish iron foundry that exported widely to the colonies in the late nineteenth century. See also history.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/waterexhibition/DrinkingP... and particularly history.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/waterexhibition/images/zo... [https://www.flickr.com/photos/pellethepoet/14160526464]

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 02/Apr/2015 09:40:18

    I know Isaac is an earlier Corry, but you just do not hear much about duels these days especially duels including Henry Grattan! Defeat of the `98 rebellion was swiftly followed by the Act of Union, when the Irish parliament was dissolved. Stormy debates, especially between Henry Grattan and Sir Isaac Corry, had taken place in the parliament on College Green, - now the Bank of Ireland. They resulted in a duel between the two former comrades, in which Corry was wounded. From Newry Memoirs

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 02/Apr/2015 09:42:21

    Sydney imported 8 fountains in 1870 - if that helps with the dating of this photo ...

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 02/Apr/2015 09:48:21

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia I think it is exactly the same, well done. I saw a quote from Jonathan Swift about Newry, he described it as “High church, low steeple; dirty streets and proud people,” My immediate thought was Limerick!!

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 02/Apr/2015 09:49:14

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Drinking fountain it is then.

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    O Mac

    • 02/Apr/2015 09:58:51

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] Your common and garden furniture... catologue from 1885 Page 4 ........ archive.org/details/macfarlanescasti00walt

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    pellethepoet

    • 02/Apr/2015 10:02:48

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Always a thrill to see Walter Macfarlane & Co.'s casting #8 cast iron canopy drinking fountain in old photographs.

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  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 02/Apr/2015 10:10:16

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Great useful catalogue - park benches, urinals, and WCs further on ... [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] re Duels - evidently Grattan called Corry "a dancing master" (!!) which led to the duel - from a wordy 1844 newspaper article about Irish barrister duels - trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/31742423?searchTerm=%22i... look for the orange highlights.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 02/Apr/2015 10:16:21

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] Archiseek seems to have renamed them McFarland, but yes. It looks like a variant on the fountain to the right of "no. 8" in [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] 's catalogue. The canopy is casting #20, and the font #18.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 02/Apr/2015 10:21:25

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner John, do you remember this from a previous Newry Photo - the one Sharon references above. The duel is mentioned in Strumpet City . Yearling contemplates in Book Tree (1913-1914), Chapter Two, while waiting for Father O'Connor near Ball's Bridge: "Henry Grattan, he remembered, had fought a duel here when Ireland still had a parliament of her own."

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 02/Apr/2015 10:32:26

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Your reference says the duel happened during the debate on the 17th Feb (as per https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner in the prior photo) John may have to get the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography to make another change!

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    sharon.corbet

    • 02/Apr/2015 14:44:28

    I meant to add, before getting distracted by drinking fountains, that the two Trevor Corrys were uncle and nephew. Sir Trevor, Baron of Poland (?-1781), had at least 2 brothers, Edward(1722-1792) and Isaac(1723-1809). Trevor the magistrate (?-1838) was Isaac's son, while Isaac, the Chancellor and duelist (1755-1813) was Edward's son. (Making them cousins). Source

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    John Spooner

    • 02/Apr/2015 15:02:26

    The London Times of 27th Feb 1800 published a letter from the seconds to the 2 duellists, which stated that the debate took place in the early evening of the 17th, and the duel took place "at day-light", which must have been the morning of the 18th. Following the duel the two "exchanged mutual civilities". A news article on 26th Feb refers to Corry appearing in the Commons (Dublin Castle) on the 20th with his arm in a sling* due to "a wound received in the affair of honour with Mr Grattan on Tuesday morning." Tuesday was the 18th. * except it looks like "fling"

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 02/Apr/2015 15:34:53

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Thanks for the clarification. https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Thanks for the family tree information.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 02/Apr/2015 15:37:34

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] That catalogue was a great find, a very enterprising firm.

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    O Mac

    • 02/Apr/2015 18:38:02

    MacFarlane fountain #8 above stood 9'6" and cost £27-16-9 in 1885 From this history of the foundry one could surmise that the above photograph has to be post 1872. www.glasgowsculpture.com/pg_biography.php?sub=macfarlane_...

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 02/Apr/2015 19:58:28

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I will change the date range.

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    nannyjean35

    • 05/Apr/2015 16:24:42

    lovely street scene

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    DannyM8

    • 07/Apr/2015 08:51:24

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Please see the following link it is of the big fountain in Dun Laoghaire. NLI Archive

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    pellethepoet

    • 07/Apr/2015 09:46:23

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Hey Danny, that's another one of Walter Macfarlane & Co.'s popular combos - casting #20 canopy, with #18 font. Launceston in Tasmania also chose that for their Queen Victoria memorial in 1897, although to mark a different occasion - www.flickr.com/photos/pellethepoet/13933933619/ Helen (Flickr user: [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/]), the Queen of memorial drinking fountains, has blogged about it here - memorialdrinkingfountains.wordpress.com/2013/12/29/victor...