Standing up and sitting down!

Download this image

More from this collection

Related by Where

Research Help!

Where: Waterford, Ireland

Try to find the spot where the photographer was standing.

When: 26 July 1907

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
This is a shot of tailors in the premises of Hearnes, Quay Waterford. A little research shows that the location is more likely to be Georges Street than any of the quays in the city!

See: www.census.nationalarchives.ie/exhibition/waterford/econo...

Photographer: A. H. Poole Poole Photographic Studio, Waterford

Circa: 25th July 1907

NLI Ref: POOLEWP 1711

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 32930
tailors tailor crosslegged hearnes quay waterford 1907 ahpoole arthurhenripoole glassnegative nationallibraryofireland merchantsquay meaghersquay georgesstreet ironingboard messrshearne quaywaterford männer arbeit irland man men hommes foto sw schneider beruf arbeiten work profession poolephotographiccollection hombres fotoantigua sastres 20thcentury

Add Tags
  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 13/Jan/2015 08:40:49

    Good morning all Flickroonies and here is a scene of intense industry and an issue of location for you from Irelands oldest city. Waterford is a beautiful, ancient and historic city and the traders there have a long history of innovation and style. Hearnes are no exception and this shot shows their tailors at work. Who can help us to put this in the correct location????

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 13/Jan/2015 09:37:25

    Here in the archive is Hearne's tailor shop window, at number 64.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 13/Jan/2015 11:00:30

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Very good Niall but 64 what? The Quay or Georges Street???

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 13/Jan/2015 11:52:32

    Both! Looking at the OSI site at GeoHive, Number 64 on Merchant's Quay (now Meagher's Quay) stretched right back to George's Street behind. Today the site is split between the Granville Hotel on the Quay and a shopping centre on George's street, but back in the day, it was one site.

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 13/Jan/2015 12:57:54

    The word Overseer comes to mind for those standing up? The workers all seem to be reasonably well dressed, perhaps as a perk of the job they were able to make a suit for themselves? Is there a status attaching to the hats that can be seen in the photo. Ps - the note feature you talked about last week is sorely missed

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 13/Jan/2015 18:08:14

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] Hearnes must have had two shops on the quay.? No. 64 ( Ship reflection) and this one No 33 www.nli.ie/glassplates/P_WP/P_WP_0442.jpg The shop on Georges St was No. 27 www.nli.ie/glassplates/P_WP/P_WP_2611.jpg

  • profile

    ofarrl

    • 13/Jan/2015 19:42:48

    When I was a child Hearne's stretched from Georges Street to the Quay and covered a very large area and encompassed several buildings. They had a system of cables that took cash up to an overhead cashiers office where receipts were issued and sent back down to the counter that was still in use up until at least the end of the 1960's I believe. Some more about it here, www.ids.u-net.com/cash/rapidwire.htm This is the way I remember the shop Hearns Dept Store Waterford 1965 My uncle worked as a cabinet maker for them for many years at their furniture factory in Little Patrick Street.

  • profile

    eyelightfilms

    • 14/Jan/2015 13:11:18

    How bizarre that they're working on the floor. Can't be comfortable for any length of time, and the suits being made are draped over the floor. All have their boots on so the floor must have some dirt from the street. The man to the far right, near the fireplace, (and also I think a man behind him), is ironing on a small ironing board balanced on his knee. Oh to have the notes system back.

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 14/Jan/2015 14:17:24

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/eyelightfilms try adding a note now!!

  • profile

    dorameulman

    • 14/Jan/2015 15:32:52

    That's a terrible way to work it's bad for the back and it's not very productive either. I'm surprised by this!

  • profile

    ofarrl

    • 14/Jan/2015 15:50:15

    This is actually the traditional way tailors worked, seated on the floor or even on raised platforms and is known as sitting tailor style or tailor fashion. This is a nice old photo of a tailor working in a similar fashion www.anniecholewa.com/2013/09/snippets.html

  • profile

    ofarrl

    • 14/Jan/2015 16:42:21

    another nice one of a tailor seated the same way Tailor at tram depot in Stockholm 1943

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 14/Jan/2015 20:46:12

    I remember going into tailors premises when I was a child back in the early 50's and they were all sitting on their tables which they used to lay out the suits at different times during the process. I never saw them sitting on the floor in that fashion but it may have been the practice in bigger establishments! The small irons and boards were probably brought into play when the suits were being assembled as flattened creases and seams would lie better when sewn together!

  • profile

    Paul Steptoe Riley

    • 15/Jan/2015 16:05:24

    fascinating image

  • profile

    dorameulman

    • 16/Jan/2015 13:25:44

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Thanks I didn't know that, makes me ache just looking at them. :-)

  • profile

    Patrick_Glesca

    • 18/Jan/2015 18:16:45

    My great grandfather was a tailor in Glasgow and worked sitting like this on a raised platform in front of the window. I've seen the same technique used by modern day tailors in Romania.

  • profile

    Reconstructing Light

    • 21/Jan/2015 18:24:43

    I could sit like that for a hour or so...............and then remain locked in that shape until I would get taken to hospital to get unfolded.

  • profile

    Skirls&Chokes

    • 02/Feb/2015 19:26:27

    I have often seen old photos of military tailors - kiltmakers, in particular - seated that way and thought it was some sort of military peculiarity. Interesting to learn it was a general practice. I wonder: was it commonplace for women, too? My great aunt Kate was listed as "dressmaker" or "seamstress" in every record. My back is now creaking in sympathy. (Or is it empathy? I should really look these words up before using them.)

  • profile

    badcatkin64

    • 06/Oct/2015 05:37:29

    Oh my.... I have read and been aware of the " sweat shops, but other that Lewis Hines, I've never seen this kind of thin... Check the few fellows standing up & looking over the " tailors"