Queueing for the sales?

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Where: Cork, Ireland

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When: 01 January 1921

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Armed Royal Irish Constabulary outside a shop in Patrick Street, Cork getting the news from the street vendor!

Photographer: W.D. Hogan

Collection: Hogan-Wilson Collection

Date: Circa 1921

NLI ref. HOGW 52

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie


Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 34128
ric royalirishconstabulary patrickstcork cork ireland warofindependence 19191922 embossed wesley chapel hoganwilsoncollection nationallibraryofireland methodistswesleychapel johnburkesshoeshop missfoleybookseller militär uniform männer foto old history vintage irland policias fotoantigua williamdavidhogan wdhogan

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 14/Jan/2015 08:05:00

    Good morning all, I hope the snow and frost are not too severe for you? We continue with another photograph from the Hogan-Wilson Collection and taken in Cork around 1921!

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    abundant pigs

    • 14/Jan/2015 08:41:12

    Great photo

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    O Mac

    • 14/Jan/2015 09:33:25

    This was taken ( Possibly 27th March 1921 ? ) outside the Methodist's Wesley Chapel, Patrick St. John Burke's shoe shop on left and Miss Foley, bookseller on right. maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V1,567522,571951,7,9 www.google.ie/maps/@51.898544,-8.471999,3a,43y,12.34h,89....

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    mogey

    • 14/Jan/2015 09:42:14

    Just looking on Streetview,seems to be Evans now

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    mogey

    • 14/Jan/2015 09:44:12

    goo.gl/maps/C3XYQ

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    DannyM8

    • 14/Jan/2015 14:11:10

    I was looking at some older photos earlier and I was surprised to see the Notes still there! https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/10833970264/in/photolist-bT52Ak-hvmVUL/ Have a look yourself...

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    DannyM8

    • 14/Jan/2015 15:07:36

    I just added a note to this photo...

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    dorameulman

    • 14/Jan/2015 15:24:46

    Another brilliant photo :-)

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 14/Jan/2015 16:17:29

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Danny, apparently you can still access the notes feature in some of the older versions of Flickr! Below is a copy of a comment by Niall that explains how to restore the notes facility. (not sure if the link included will work but you can see Nialls comment on the first of Mary's uploads) If you go here, you can read how to restore the Notes function in Firefox and Chrome. I just added a note IDing Walter McGrath here as a test. Of course, only other people who have jimmied their browser will see any notes you add this way, unless Flickr ever gets fixed. But it is useful if you need to refer to an older photo, for example if our new nli overlords were to post a pic of, say, Stephen's Green, you might want to refer to one of the notes on a previously posted shot.

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 15/Jan/2015 02:54:11

    News of what I wonder?

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    guliolopez

    • 15/Jan/2015 21:44:57

    Well, now this is a proper return to form: Mary posts a Cork one, and I'm so late the game there's scarce little to add. [https://www.flickr.com/photos/mogey] and [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] have the positioning spot-on. I've nothing to add. However, I have to ask [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] - why/how so specific on the date? For my part, all I can really say is that the Wesley Chapel (main columned doorway in our shot) was among the first "new" buildings built on Patrick St in the 1800s. It was in use as a place of worship until the 1980s, when the Methodist congregation moved to a new church in Douglas. See history (with interior shots). I've been in the "new" church a few times, but never the original. (Off with me to Evans at the weekend to see what Dorothy Perkins has done with the place!) As for Burke's Shoes, they appear at the same address in the 1913, 1921, 1925 and 1930 street directories. But not in the 1935 directory. So this wasn't a closing-down sale. Foley's Booksellers had a longer innings, appearing in the directories from 1907 to 1935. But not in the 1940 directory.

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    guliolopez

    • 15/Jan/2015 21:46:15

    PS: I wonder if the young fella was an Echo boy? If so, he was 50 yards from the Echo offices (again - coincidentally - the same office/street as mentioned recently)

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    O Mac

    • 16/Jan/2015 17:56:09

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Just a guess....Burkes is closed so possibly a Sunday ?? Hogan was about the Sunday of the Clogheen funerals so I think it's a fair possibility he took this photograph earlier that same morning . The RIC look as if they are waiting for something and such heavy presence would suggest they were expecting trouble...... considering the day that was in it ???? Guys from 1921 states Wesley Chapel didnt open until 11.30am on Sundays. We'll never know for sure tho :)

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    guliolopez

    • 18/Jan/2015 11:24:40

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] It's a great thought, but I'm not sure actually Burke's is really closed in this (RIC) shot. In this RIC shot, it looks like there's a shutter that hasn't been drawn across the door-way. (So these lads are blocking the doorway, but I don't think it's because Burke's is closed. I think it's because they just aren't the type to give a sh-ugar). When we compare this to the other shot, Burke's looks a lot more shut. I say this because we can see Burke's in the other (funeral) shot: look for the same hanging globelight outside the series of "bow-fronted" buildings on the left-side of the street. In the funeral shot, Burke's (and the other shops on that side of the street) have the windows covered, and boards put up. (Also, if the lad is a paperboy, and the RIC man next to the officer is reading a paper, then I'd note that neither the Evening Echo or the Cork Examiner were printed or sold on Sundays.) While Hogan was in Cork quite a bit during the War of Independence (and indeed Civil War), it would however be nice to think that this was taken in the days or weeks either-side of the funeral shot. But I don't think it's the exact same day.

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    O Mac

    • 18/Jan/2015 20:18:30

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] You're probably right.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/Jan/2015 20:38:37

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I suspect that the RIC are not just standing in any doorway because they don't five a darn! The combined doorways are set into the line of the buildings and anybody wanting to take a potshot at them would have to move out onto the footpath and give the game away. Any cover is better than no cover!

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    Carol Maddock

    • 11/Jul/2019 14:48:22

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Helllooooo! This is a four year old ghooost from fadó fadó! :) Just wondering why you said this might have been 27th March 1921??

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    O Mac

    • 13/Jul/2019 21:27:12

    Carol Maddock huh!! oh do I have to? That was 4 years ago when brain worked But hang on a minute... do you not remember this Hogan photo where all was explained? www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/16037291180 what has you goin all the ways back here again....?

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    Carol Maddock

    • 19/Jul/2019 10:20:44

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Our War of Independence exhibition (opening in November) has me goin all the ways back here. :)