Gobble, Gobble!

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Where: Leinster, County Kilkenny, Ireland

Try to find the spot where the photographer was standing.

When: 16 December 1907

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
Turkeys being delivered to Flynn & Young’s on Conduit Lane in Waterford. Could the chap who's lifting up one of the turkeys be the gentleman on the right in this interior shot of Flynn & Young's??

+++ UPDATE +++
We never did get a definite answer to this question, but we found out some amazing information about how flocks of turkeys or geese, and herds(?) of pigs used be walked, yes walked, many miles to markets back in the day. So our Flynn & Young turkeys above were travelling in comparative luxury!

Photographer: Poole Photographic Studios, Waterford

Date: 16 December 1907? (a little tenuous, but taken around the same time as this one)

NLI Ref: POOLEWP 0520

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 60937
ghostsofxmaspast flynnyoungs conduitlane waterford ireland munster donkey cart tford ardee turkeys caps feathers shawl fishmongers poulterers butchers ahpoole arthurhenripoole glassnegative animal ass equus bird birds animals poultry poolephotographiccollection 20thcentury

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  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 09/Dec/2013 09:51:12

    A Model T. Ford !

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 09/Dec/2013 10:51:14

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia An early one! Are there a load of Ardees in the country? Why am I asking an Australian? :) The only one I know is Ardee in Co. Louth, and there's no way this young woman came all the way from there. Evidence that carts changed hands just like cars and motor bikes?

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 09/Dec/2013 11:17:51

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland I have no idea, sorry. I was going by your own tags on the right --->

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 09/Dec/2013 11:34:30

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Looking at the tags? Whatever next! As you were then... :)

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    billh35

    • 09/Dec/2013 11:56:01

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland I've only ever heard of the county Louth Ardee...

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    Niall McAuley

    • 09/Dec/2013 12:06:03

    No sign of a T. Ford in Ardee in 1901 or 1911. There's a Thomas Ford, blacksmith, in Cavan (two addresses). Maybe he moved to Ardee later - which would put this after 1911 (VERY tenuous :)

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 09/Dec/2013 12:49:49

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley As you say, VERY tenuous! :)

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    John Spooner

    • 09/Dec/2013 13:14:55

    This isn't even remotely tenuous, but in 1897 the rector of Ardee was the Rev A Lockett Ford.

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    TEXASJOHN

    • 09/Dec/2013 14:26:33

    The wall with the pipe attached to it looks as if the pipe may have been replaced on more than one occasion!

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 09/Dec/2013 14:30:51

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] That mixture of stone and brick intrigues me.

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    blackpoolbeach

    • 09/Dec/2013 14:40:14

    Conduit Lane is here on OSI maps "Ard----" could be Ardlee, Ardenagh, Ardlui, Ardlain etc, within the trotting distance of a Waterford donkey.

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    blackpoolbeach

    • 09/Dec/2013 14:52:29

    This could be the very doorway off Conduit Lane. maps.google.co.uk/maps?q=Conduit+Lane,+Waterford,+Ireland...

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 09/Dec/2013 15:10:34

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoolbeach Thank you for the trotting distance suggestions! Definitely has to start with ARDE----. I double-checked on the matching photo in Super Duper High Res. And that really could be the very doorway - thanks!

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 09/Dec/2013 17:57:35

    More about what we fail to see rather than what we see? How about Thomas FORan of ARDErra (Pollrone, Kilkenny) he is a farmers son 31 in 1901, and as always!! 43 in 1911. Checking distance on Google maps and its about 20 Miles so quite possible. www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai000937245/ www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai002618840/ If I am correct could that be Mary Foran (12 or 13 in 1907) at the reins?

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 10/Dec/2013 04:36:58

    the one horsepower model, very popular...

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 11/Dec/2013 14:06:23

    Anyone else buying into Thomas Foran from Arderra?????

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 11/Dec/2013 14:34:40

    Me! Me!

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 11/Dec/2013 16:55:18

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Love the investigating and surmising, etc. Danny! Only reason I'm dubious is the 20 miles. How long would that take with a donkey and cart? Would you really transport live turkeys all the way to Waterford on bad roads, probably in bad weather?

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 12/Dec/2013 07:28:56

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] [http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] From the late 16th century, English turkeys walked the hundred miles from Norfolk to Leadenhall market in London each year. The journey would take three months and the birds wore special leather boots to protect their feet. Geese wouldn't allow themselves to be shod (hence the phrase 'to shoe a goose' for something difficult) so had their feet dipped in tar and covered with sand. Pigs wore knitted boots with leather soles, and blacksmiths nailed metal plates on to the hooves of cattle. A flock of 1,000 turkeys could be managed by 2 drovers carrying long wands of willow or hazel with red cloth tied on the ends. Turkeys move at about one mile an hour - quicker than geese - but they insisted on roosting at night, so the whole journey took longer. Traffic jams were caused by the vast flocks entering London from East Anglia, Norfolk, and Suffolk in the weeks before Christmas. In America, turkey drives rivalled some of the cattle drives: there are records of an 1863 drive from Iowa to Denver (600 miles) and flocks of 20,000 were common. From old.qi.com/talk/viewtopic.php?start=8&t=5504 [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/11335484533/] 20 Miles - with a cart and Donkey !!!! I rest My case..........................

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 12/Dec/2013 09:29:01

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Fascinating! I put it to you however, that I'm still not convinced... :D

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 12/Dec/2013 09:51:12

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Philistine

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 12/Dec/2013 10:10:10

    I remember a film on the BBC many (about 20 I'd guess) years ago about a Norfolk turkey farmer who felt he was being ripped off by the transport companies and decided to drive his turkeys to London himself, on foot. I'm pretty sure it was based on a true story. Here we are, found it (but it was geese not turkeys, and it was a lorry drivers' strike, and it was nearer 30 years, but still):

    It was common practice to protect the birds feet by dipping them in tar and covering them with sand for their 100-mile trek which was completed at a brisk waddling pace of about 1 mile an hour. The epic nature of this goose run has become the stuff of legends and in 1984 a film called ‘Singleton’s Pluck’ commemorated this remarkable journey by following a Norfolk farmer (Singleton, played by Ian Holm, who also played Bilbo in The Lord of The Rings) who was forced to take his geese to market in the traditional manner following a strike by truck drivers. The film faithfully followed one of the old goose runs and the hero came through Western Suffolk with a gaggle of geese as noisy extras. Our photograph shows the geese passing through Clare market square headed by the actor Bill Owen (famous for his Compo character in Last of the Summer Wine) who was one of Singleton’s farm hands.
    From www.focuspublications.net/life/pages/GooseRun.htm And it was channel4, not BBC. Trailer at 3:28 www.youtube.com/watch?v=t4g_VORPp_Q

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    DannyM8

    • 12/Dec/2013 10:38:05

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Fantastic but will the Philistine (Carol) believe it???

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 12/Dec/2013 10:57:24

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] It'd take a Christmas Miracle to make a believer out of me! http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner

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    DannyM8

    • 12/Dec/2013 11:34:37

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland To my favorite Philistine "There are two ways to live: you can live as if nothing is a miracle; you can live as if everything is a miracle." Albert Einstein http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner

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    Photoamble.

    • 10/Jan/2017 17:01:50

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner That was the us usual or easy way to make an opening in a rubble wall . Bricks were handy to handle .

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 12/Jan/2017 06:58:46

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/photoamble Thanks. That makes sense.