Ulster Welcomes Her King & Queen

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Where: Northern Ireland, Belfast, United Kingdom

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When: 22 June 1921

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Belfast generally, and Robinson and Cleaver Department Store in particular, en fête for the State Opening of the first Northern Ireland parliament...

Photographer: W.D. Hogan

Date: Wednesday, 22 June 1921 (at 11:55 or 12 noon)

NLI Ref.: HOGW 184

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 85255
belfast antrim ireland northernireland ulster robinsoncleaver departmentstore stateopening parliament flags bunting crowds clock king queen georgev queenmary maryofteck wednesday 22nd june 1921 1920s twenties hoganwilsoncollection nationallibraryofireland 1200 limerickbybeachcomber titanicmemorial 1155 williamdavidhogan wdhogan 20thcentury

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  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 22/Nov/2013 08:37:24

    So how are you coping with the scandal at Library Towers?

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Nov/2013 08:51:23

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] We won't be talking about that. I do hope we'll be talking about this rather splendid photograph though...

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 22/Nov/2013 08:55:31

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland lol

  • profile

    Robinson_Luzo

    • 22/Nov/2013 09:22:28

    The clock on the right of the tower certainly indicates midday, though the one to the left of it seems just a little off (could be the angle though....)

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Nov/2013 09:24:42

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I was hoping it was the angle that had the left face a little off alright. It is just too delicious to think of W.D. Hogan waiting for the stroke of noon to take this photograph...

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  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 22/Nov/2013 09:35:29

    As reported in the Sydney Morning Herald 24/6/1921 - trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/15951773 ...

    ... ... The street decorations presented a lavish riot of colour. The King wore naval uniform. The great square on the quay was thickly lined with troops, and an armoured motor car patrolled the square. The 10th Hussars escorted the King and Queen, and the streets were lined by six battalions of Infantry, while overhead a squadron of aeroplanes, at an elevation of 500ft, kept vigil. When the King reached the City Hall the crowd spontaneously sang the old Orange ballad, "Derry Walls." ... ...

  • profile

    Robinson_Luzo

    • 22/Nov/2013 09:40:59

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Wouldn't be unheard of though, two photos in Gordon Lucy's "The Ulster Covenant" are taken literally when the doors opened for the signing of the covenant while a photographer for a newspaper cartoonist was positioned inside the doors and took a snap of the first person to (literally) tumble past them.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Nov/2013 09:44:08

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia You will like this with your maritime background! ;) From the Irish Times on Saturday, 18 June 1921: "His Majesty will subsequently drive to the City Hall for the opening of the Parliament in the State coach, drawn by a team of white horses, and escorted by Life Guards..."

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Nov/2013 09:45:47

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Do indeed! That was a brilliant "Unidentified".

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Nov/2013 09:47:29

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Executive decision time then! Will we say 12 noon, and the left-hand clock face was a little off? Who knows - someone may unearth an article about problems with Robinson & Cleaver's clock works? Stranger things have happened around here...

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    John Spooner

    • 22/Nov/2013 09:54:02

    According to the "Full Official programme" published in the London Times on June 22, the royal party was due to arrive at City Hall at 11:50

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Nov/2013 10:03:55

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Will check the "afters" reports to see how they kept to the proposed schedule...

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    John Spooner

    • 22/Nov/2013 10:07:27

    Here's a picture from a similar position which was published in the London Times the following day.Complete with white horses. times2 "These photographs were taken by a staff photographer of The Times, and reached London by a specially chartered aeroplane."

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 22/Nov/2013 10:09:27

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland In parliament Mr Chamberlain said that the King made the opening speech at 12:30 (bang on schedule)

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 22/Nov/2013 10:14:01

    I think it is due to parallax error or the angle of the dangle. This photo at full blast shows 09:00 at left, and 09:05 at right, because the minute hand is quite a way off the face ... http://www.flickr.com/photos/bellface/5167160255/sizes/o/in/photostream/

  • profile

    Vab2009

    • 22/Nov/2013 10:26:01

    I can only add a memory - as a kid I loved the huge marble staircase that dominated the ground floor in this department store - it was VERY grand. Sadly it was bought and taken out when Robinson & Cleavers closed down. But it was fit for Royalty - I wonder did they tread the stairs too? I think the staircase went to a large home near Rostrevor.

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 22/Nov/2013 10:33:10

    Check clock at 2 minutes into this Pathe Newsreel .... this is probably as close as we'll ever get to seeing Mr Hogan take a photograph...He's out there somewhere .:)

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Nov/2013 10:45:31

    Best article ever in the Irish Times on Thursday, 23 June 1921! I wish I knew who the "Special Correspondents" were so that we could Huzzah them for the gorgeous details in the article (including the presence of a Councillor Twaddell and how "outside the band was playing Bubbles, and the full-length portrait of Queen Victoria, to the left of the Royal chairs, seemed to frown upon such levity"). However, here's the time line:

    THEIR MAJESTIES ARRIVE. At twelve o'clock to the second two heralds, in full regalia, with silver trumpets, toook up positions at either side of the Royal chairs ... They were followed a munute afterwards by Lord Pirrie and the Lord Chancellor of Ireland, who wore levée uniform. By a quarter past twelve everybody had settled down except one gentleman, who insisted on reading a newspaper up to the last moment. Male coiffures were smoothed into place. Little nervous coughs betrayed that excitement which outward composure strove to hide, and when the doors at the far end of the room swung open, even they were suppressed. A fanfare of trumpets crashed on the heavy silence, and the whole assembly rose to it feet...

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 22/Nov/2013 10:56:41

    The Twelve o'clock Limerick Hickory dickory dock The mouse ran up the clock The clock struck noon On twenty-two June The mouse got one heck of a shock!

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Nov/2013 11:01:17

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] That is fantastic, thank you! Wondering if 11:55 might be the correct time on the Robinson & Cleaver clock rather than noon. That newsreel makes it look as if they didn't hang around outside once they got out of the carriage and if at "twelve o'clock to the second" they were entering the chamber...??? Delighted to think that Mr Hogan is captured there somewhere. He's rather an elusive figure. I'm still trying to find out what W.D. stood for. (Just thinking now, must check 1911 census and see if there are any Hogan photographers.)

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Nov/2013 11:02:27

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Could we also have an Eleven Fifty-Five Limerick please just in Casey, if that's not pushing our luck? :)

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    John Spooner

    • 22/Nov/2013 11:04:57

    Advert for Robinson and Cleaver which appeared in the 8-page 'infomercial' supplement to the London Times on 22nd June 1921. The supplement is half articles saying how wonderful it is, and half adverts placed by Belfast business. As well as R & C, there are banks, Harland & Wolff, shipping companies etc. The whole of the back page is a rather wonderful advert for Ross's Belfast Ginger Ale. In the main body of the paper is an account of the dress-rehearsal for the royal visit on the 21st.

    Throughout the route to be followed by the King and Queen has been thronged with people. The crowds will linger in the centre of the city until 10 o'clock, and then melt away with the approach of curfew. I watched the people last night from an hotel window. At 10 c'clock thousands of men and women were still strolling through the streets. A quarter of an hour later the thousands had diminished to scores. By 10.25 the pavements were deserted, except for one or two belated civilians hurrying rapidly along. When the half-hour had turned there was silence, which remained unbroken until one heard a quick resounding shout of "Halt" and a military patrol stepped across the roadway towards a man standing rigidly still. The soldiers took from him a paper, examined it by the fading light, and then sent him on his way. He had a permit to be out.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Nov/2013 11:17:15

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/vab2009] Please don't ever say "only a memory"! We love to hear them, and it's lovely to know about the marble staircase. :) In Dublin yesterday, Clery's department store re-opened following flood damage. I'm hearing that an original staircase has been revealed - hope it's true...

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Nov/2013 11:41:20

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] Belfast Curfew in November of 1921 (Mega Zoomable)...

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 22/Nov/2013 11:41:53

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Ask one of the #PoetryAloud professionals!

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Nov/2013 11:50:19

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia They're all a bit busy being semi-finalists here today!

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    Swordscookie

    • 22/Nov/2013 11:52:41

    A super shot with great crowd detail and a conundrum for those horologically minded amongst us. Is that a tricolour I see on the top left among all the Union flags???? There's always one around you know:-))))) http://www.flickr.com/photos/vab2009 Great memory Viv, it must have been a spectacular staircase.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Nov/2013 11:57:33

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie If it was a tricolour, it must have been snuck in very briefly! In the Irish Times article above, the writer(s) mentioned one flag that was "conspicuous by its absence" - I'm assuming that was a tricolour?

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Nov/2013 12:02:48

    To get a flavour of the finery on display, here's Sir Hamar (Chief Secretary for Ireland) and Lady Margery Greenwood. And is that an R.I.C. dress uniform on their escort?

  • profile

    Vab2009

    • 22/Nov/2013 12:08:06

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie I think it might be the French Tricolour as to it's left is the old Japanese flag. And I think there might be some other nationalities there. In black and white it is very hard to tell the Irish Tricolour from the French tricolour :-)

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    John Spooner

    • 22/Nov/2013 12:19:27

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/vab2009 While I was cycling round Italy last year I wondered why there were so many Irish flags about. A faded tricolore is indistinguishable from an Irish tricolour (but wasn't adopted until 1946).

  • profile

    Vab2009

    • 22/Nov/2013 12:20:24

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] What a terrific piece of newsreel. I pity all the horses ... and can only wonder who picks up all the horse manure :-)

  • profile

    Vab2009

    • 22/Nov/2013 12:24:41

    I always enjoy the visits of the Irish Lights vessel, the Granuaille, up north as it is one of the lesser known bits that the Commissioners for Irish Lights service all of the lighthouses and lights of Ireland and of course she flies the Irish ensign. Sorry - I digress :-)

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Nov/2013 12:43:45

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/vab2009 Digressions always welcome, as well as memories! :)

  • profile

    Swordscookie

    • 22/Nov/2013 13:20:15

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland http://www.flickr.com/photos/vab2009 I was just stirring the pot a wee bit, I guessed that it was the French version okay!

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Nov/2013 13:43:13

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie Oh you! ;)

  • profile

    Vab2009

    • 22/Nov/2013 13:44:24

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie Trouble maker ..Lol!

  • profile

    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 22/Nov/2013 14:01:24

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/vab2009 The French have no great love for English royalty, and I don't see people on bicycles with baguettes under their arms either... ;)

  • profile

    TEXASJOHN

    • 22/Nov/2013 14:17:25

    Nice!

  • profile

    Reconstructing Light

    • 22/Nov/2013 17:18:35

    Wow!! What a crowd. The Robinson and Cleaver Building never looked better.

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    Reconstructing Light

    • 22/Nov/2013 17:18:53

    Is that a boxing ring center front?

  • profile

    ajw423uk

    • 22/Nov/2013 18:02:17

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland That's a military uniform- King's Royal Rifle Corps.

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    John Spooner

    • 22/Nov/2013 22:26:05

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/ajw423uk Could it be the Royal Ulster Rifles? They provided the guard of honour in front of City Hall, under the command of Captain Robert Barrett-Hutcheson (b 28/11/1883 in Belfast, died 20/8/1966 in Denbeighshire, Wales, living in Dublin in 1901 census)

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    bryanbyrnes

    • 24/Nov/2013 16:37:55

    Wow what a pic!!

  • profile

    billh35

    • 25/Nov/2013 10:37:21

    The arrival of King George V at the City Hall as recorded by the Belfast Telegraoh - photosales.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/media/tEUVxvuEldNECXYmZ... and before anyone asks that is NOT a Pizza Express sign in the background! photosales.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/media/u71CLIAgAAyDbdHhh...

  • profile

    ajw423uk

    • 25/Nov/2013 18:43:17

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner The Royal Ulster Rifles had the Irish harp as their badge- very like the RIC in fact. (Googled it, don't claim to have known it off the top of my head!). I'm guessing this chap's an Aide de Camp or somesuch. And he's a major anyway.

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    billh35

    • 25/Nov/2013 19:19:43

    The Royal Ulster Rifles (formerly known as the Royal Irish Rifles until renamed on 1st January 1921) harp has the words "Quis Separabit" below it. Sir Hamar's AdC is not from the RUR. He is with the King's Royal Rifle Corps garrisoned in Northern Ireland.

  • profile

    whatsthatpicture

    • 17/Dec/2013 10:09:58

    whatsthatpicture has suggested a location for this image. View the suggestion on the Commons Tagr app. If you're the image owner, login to approve the suggestion and update the location on Flickr.

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    billh35

    • 17/Dec/2013 16:43:29

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/whatsthatpicture] But we know where it is? It's the Robinson & Cleave Building in Donegall Square North at the City Hall in Belfast. Here's the same building today - maps.google.co.uk/maps?q=city+hall+belfast&hl=en&...

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    whatsthatpicture

    • 17/Dec/2013 19:02:37

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Yes, but http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland hasn't added it to the Flickr map as of yet. I guess I should reword that comment - it's posted by my Commons Tagr app when a suggestion is made and the image owner can then accept it which means that it will added automatically, saving going through all the hassle of finding it again and then adding it manually.

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    Moochin Photoman

    • 28/Jan/2014 20:02:22

    theres no possibly about it it's written on the front of the building

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    M0GNM

    • 24/Apr/2015 17:29:25

    Centre is the Titanic memorial which I think has been moved into the grounds of the City Hall. In the 1960's I used to walk past here every day on the way home from school.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Nov/2015 00:19:42

    I have just added this photo to our 50,000+ Views Album https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/sets/72157651136879037