A twin funnel passenger ship aground on a rock covered beach

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Where: Unknown

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When: 01 January 1910

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This photo is part of the Australian National Maritime Museum’s William Hall collection. If reproduced or distributed, this image should be clearly attributed to the collection of the Australian National Maritime Museum; and not be used for any commercial or for-profit purposes without the permission of the museum. For more information see our Flickr Commons Rights Statement.

The Australian National Maritime Museum undertakes research and accepts public comments that enhance the information we hold about images in our collection. If you can identify a person, vessel or landmark, write the details in the Comments box below.

Thank you for helping caption this important historical image.

Object number: ANMS1092[162]

ANMM Collection Gift from Mr and Mrs Glassford

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Owner: Australian National Maritime Museum on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 6685
wreck shipwreck shore williamhall williamhallcollection

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 11/Sep/2013 11:04:21

    Ooops! Wondering what and where?

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 17/Sep/2013 09:12:02

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] I think you could well be right. RMS MALOJA - [http://www.flickr.com/photos/anmm_thecommons/8570796402/]

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    Australian National Maritime Museum on The Commons

    • 18/Sep/2013 06:53:23

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] We'll have a closer look & see if we can confirm the liner is MALOJA - thanks guys :)

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    PhillMono

    • 07/Oct/2013 07:42:03

    Unfortunately this ship is not the Maloja, from the link quasymody added: trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/2066720 we can see the Maloja has a crows nest on her foremast and an enclosed wheelhouse. This vessel has no look out on the mast and the wheelhouse is open to the elements. I propose this ship is P&O's China (built in 1896 and scrapped in 1928). I can't find photos of this incident online but if it is the China, then there are some photos of the ship here: www.flickr.com/photos/anmm_thecommons/8292113725/ and possibly here: www.flickr.com/photos/anmm_thecommons/8406651029/ BUT on p132 in the book 'P&O: A Fleet History' published by the World Ship Society there is a similar photo to the one posted above and the following info: 25 March 1898: China (II) ran aground on Perim Island in the Red Sea while homeward bound for Australia. After several months, the ship was salvaged and much of the bow was reconstructed. Could it be a contender?

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 07/Oct/2013 09:20:17

    Oh goody - a spanner in the works ... ! I am seeing a few anomalies with the RMS CHINA too - no paler line at water level, different porthole enclosures at the end of the bridge, 14(?) davits here to 16 on the CHINA ... . Hmmm ...

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    Australian National Maritime Museum on The Commons

    • 11/Oct/2013 03:46:52

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] Its a tricky one this one, none of our other images of vessels aground appear to depict this event - yet it must have been photographed multiple times. We'll keep looking...

  • profile

    PhillMono

    • 12/Oct/2013 01:49:18

    If this ship is the China then there may not be as many photos considering this happened in 1898 however the photo in the P&O book is a close match to this one. The davits and bridge wing differences are valid points and it's possible that these were adjusted later in the ship's life? The paler line/boot topping is there but it's not as sharp as on the other photos. Nothing like a good mystery :)

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    Australian National Maritime Museum on The Commons

    • 13/Oct/2013 22:38:02

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] I don't know if you have seen them but we have two images of RMS CHINA: P&O passenger ship RMS CHINA in Circular Quay, Sydney Harbour Departure of the P&O RMS CHINA

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    PhillMono

    • 15/Oct/2013 11:57:33

    Yes, I referenced them in my first comment :) Is there a chance of scanning the photo from P&O: A Fleet History so others can compare with this photo?

  • profile

    Australian National Maritime Museum on The Commons

    • 15/Oct/2013 21:07:43

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Oops! My apologies! Of course you are all over it :) Re the P&O Book - I'll see what I can do :)