Howth, Co. Dublin

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Where: Station House, Howth Rd, Howth, Dublin, Ireland

Try to find the spot where the photographer was standing.

When: 01 March 1959

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
A tram crossing over the elevated road bridge at Howth, Co. Dublin.

Thanks to A. P. Luckwill we have an exact location for this photo as that bridge is long gone, and he also said:
"Parts of the original Howth Head tramway trackbed are still accessible on foot, from the top down, the path ends right at the point where this bridge once stood!"

Date: March 1959

NLI Ref.: ODEA10/2

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 26408
tram elevatedbridge bridge advertising prizebonds sweetafton howthcodublin howth dublin 1959 1950s jamespodea footpaths harbourtown britisharchitecture electrictrams findlaters clock gem thegem nationallibraryofireland odeaphotographiccollection

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    Peter Denton

    • 02/Aug/2011 08:55:45

    Being of a slightly vertiginous disposition, I don't much fancy the idea of being on the top deck when that tram travels across the bridge - even without passengers, it looks top heavy!

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 02/Aug/2011 14:15:17

    Or imagine it in a really high wind...

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    Jazz_is_here

    • 02/Aug/2011 20:05:11

    It is so cool to be able and see some of our history! So very cool!!

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    RETRO STU

    • 03/Aug/2011 07:37:37

    Alas I was born too late for this. How I would love to have taken a tram ride from Howth into the City Centre on a sunny and windy day, sitting aloft at the front seat! Sadly, we'll never see the likes again. By the way, surely not....but is that the very same concrete road surface that's still there today? Stuart.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 03/Aug/2011 08:15:40

    No idea, Stu, will have to take a trip out to Howth to investigate. Maybe some "Northsiders" can advise...

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    A. P. L.

    • 14/Mar/2012 17:31:14

    The location is completely wrong on the map - needs to be corrected!

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 14/Mar/2012 17:55:34

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/apl-irl] Do you have a Lat & Long we could use, or a link to location on Google Maps, please?

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    A. P. L.

    • 14/Mar/2012 18:03:32

    53 23 19 N & 6 04 28 W g.co/maps/zt8ua depicts what the scene looks like today, bridge long since demolished!

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 15/Mar/2012 20:46:32

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/apl-irl] If you have a second, could you check if this location is more accurate. I used the Google Map co-ordinates.

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    A. P. L.

    • 16/Mar/2012 11:25:21

    Yes, spot on. Parts of the original Howth Head tramway trackbed are still accessible on foot, from the top down, the path ends right at the point where this bridge once stood!

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 06/Apr/2012 15:29:27

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/apl-irl] Thanks for the spot check! :)

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    Rienk Mebius

    • 24/Apr/2012 08:23:56

    Should never have gone.

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    photopol

    • 05/Dec/2012 21:22:38

    If you look under the bridge on the right hand side of the road, you will first see a single storey building (No. 1 Harbour Rd.) and next a two storey building (No.2). The second of these is the Gem shop. My mother ran it between 1942, when she had to resign from the Department of Social Welfare on marriage, until around 1949. I have fond memories of growing up there and have put up a page on my website. This is the shop in which Gordon Brewster, the artist/cartoonist for the Irish Independent, died on 16 June 1946. The NLI have a wonderful collection of his cartoons, which are mainly of a financial or political nature, and many of which are as relevant today as the day they were drawn. You can see one in today's tweet from NLI. The shop has been significantly expanded since my day, when it consisted of only half the ground floor, the rest being accommodation.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 03/Jan/2013 14:32:30

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/photopol] Hi Pól! Have replaced this image with a higher res one so that you can see more detail...

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    photopol

    • 07/Jan/2013 21:58:19

    Thanks. That's great. Any idea of a date? You can just about see Findlater's clock and the front of the Gem is as I remember it. From what appear to be newspaper posters outside would put it at or after 1940, and the tram stopped in 1958 as far as I remember. On the other hand that was a tea rooms and a boarding house/hotel way back, so you'd need to be able to read the posters. Now, if that were a WL glass plate, that would not be out of the question. :) And yes he is coasting down, with the trolley retracted. Fabulous stuff.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 08/Jan/2013 14:09:08

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/photopol] March 1959 is the date we have for this one, Pól. (Date is always in the description, or above the map.)

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    photopol

    • 08/Jan/2013 19:28:59

    Thanks. Should have looked before jumping in. So that would be among the almost last photos of that tram/route which I now see closed in May 1959.

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    dayana.santamaria

    • 05/Apr/2014 18:32:25

    esta foto es fascinante que bonita

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    Photoamble.

    • 12/Jul/2016 06:09:11

    Tram sound as buzz buzz buzz buzz clang clang clang clang ect . As for what it lookd like see as is . Happy memories .

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    keen hat

    • 15/Feb/2017 15:38:52

    You can see the remains of this when you come out of the station and walk towards the harbour on the left. The detail in the Stone work on both sides of the road still remain.

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    Thom's 1904

    • 19/Mar/2018 06:49:41

    Ulysses p40 offers what's probably a confession of Joyce's teen years: "On the top of the Howth tram alone crying to the rain: naked women!"