Man with shell fragments

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Where: 20 Rium Terrace, Hartlepool TS24 8AW, UK

Try to find the spot where the photographer was standing.

When: 01 January 1914

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A man holding shell fragments found in Girvan Terrace, off Throston Street in West Hartlepool. This was the result of the bombardment of the Hartlepools by Germany, which took place on the 16th December 1914. It was the first time British civilians were in the line of enemy fire during a World War. HAPMG : 240

Images from Hartlepool Cultural Services that are part of The Commons on Flickr are labeled 'no known copyright restrictions' indicating that Hartlepool Cultural Services is unaware of any current copyright restrictions on these images either because the copyright is waived or the term of copyright has expired.

Commercial use of images is not permitted. Applications for commercial use or for higher quality reproductions should be made to Hartlepool Cultural Services, Sir William Gray House, Clarence Road, Hartlepool, TS24 8BT. When using the images please credit 'Hartlepool Cultural Services'.

Info:

Owner: Museum of Hartlepool
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 17223
bombardment worldwari hartlepool policeman bomb navy navalbombardment german germany shell 1914

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  • profile

    Muddy Watters

    • 21/Apr/2011 01:15:59

    I like the uniform on the police man in the back ground.

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    elizabeth.littlefield

    • 21/Apr/2011 02:55:50

    Fantastic.

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    holgate

    • 21/Apr/2011 03:08:52

    Was going to ask whether this was from the Zeppelin attack, then saw the set description that confirmed it. A fantastic collection, and a worthy addition to the Commons: could I ask the librarians to add a little more detail to the individual photo pages?

  • profile

    DacidUser27

    • 21/Apr/2011 05:31:49

    Fantastic photo!! Buy HCG

  • profile

    sizervillain

    • 21/Apr/2011 08:02:19

    Excellent!

  • profile

    Michael DeVowe

    • 21/Apr/2011 13:39:38

    This is very interesting. I love the police man in the background!

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    Toby Rampton

    • 21/Apr/2011 14:07:48

    Amazing picture! Nice pipes too!

  • profile

    Jim Plumb

    • 21/Apr/2011 14:10:55

    Cool photo. Too bad scammers have invaded.

  • profile

    Ehmbong

    • 21/Apr/2011 14:49:50

    I really love retro images like these, the sets in here are simply superb!

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    █ fo112 █

    • 21/Apr/2011 16:24:27

    Nice Shot!!labels=1 labels=1 labels=1:)

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    whatsthatpicture

    • 21/Apr/2011 19:04:17

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/nicksweeney/] not Zeppelin, but naval bombardment - see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raid_on_Scarborough,_Hartlepool_and... I agree with you on asking curators/archivists/librarians to add such details in descriptions. Would also be nice to see the images with a proper 'date taken' and geotagged where this is known. But that's not criticism as such, and can all be sorted in time - great that the images are here at all than seeing the extra work deter such institutions from sharing their collections

  • profile

    patrick.vickers1

    • 21/Apr/2011 19:14:01

    This was the shelling of Hartlepool, Scarborough and Whitby by three German battleships,not by the Zeppelin..

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    holgate

    • 21/Apr/2011 20:57:47

    I appreciate the correction: the Zeppelin raids are famous, which is why I leapt to that conclusion, but the naval shelling is historically more significant, as the arrival of civilian bombardment to Britain.

  • profile

    4String

    • 21/Apr/2011 22:26:17

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/nicksweeney] This bombardment was significant for so many reasons. Though we'd been at war with Germany since August of that year and the significant numbers of soldiers were dying, they were all on foreign soil. The first british soldier killed on british soil during the conflict, died during this bombardment. Up until then, there had not been a military casualty on British soil since the Jacobites had been defeated at the Battle of Culloden in 1746. And as far as England was concerned, there had been no military casualties since the Battle of Sedgemoor in 1685 during the Monmouth Rebellion.

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    holgate

    • 21/Apr/2011 23:13:56

    Conversely, gunboat diplomacy had been standard British practice throughout the previous century: literally stationing vessels offshore and either blockading or bombarding foreign ports.

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    Ben_Hazrael

    • 22/Apr/2011 03:28:38

    Espetacular, cool and belíssima!!!

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    Museum of Hartlepool

    • 23/Apr/2011 00:07:10

    Incidently Hartlepool was also attacked by Zeppelin airships during World War I. One piloted by the uncle of the famous film actress Marlene Dietrich was shot down off the coast with all hands lost. Hartlepool is the only town in Britain to have suffered more civilain casualties in World War I than in World War II.

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    patrick.vickers1

    • 27/Apr/2011 18:03:31

    Those who wish to see a map of the track of the German battle cruisers during this action can see a picture on my photo-stream, do not forget that you can enlarge this photo by clicking on actions and then on pictures and then the scene will be much clearer..

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    AmandaF12345

    • 01/Jun/2011 23:25:11

    Girvan Terrace wasn't on the Headland, it was in West Hartlepool, just off where Raby Road stands today. My family lived at 5 Girvan Terrace for many years. It is shown on the West Hartlepool map of 1896.

  • profile

    AmandaF12345

    • 01/Jun/2011 23:27:23

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/hartlepool_museum] Thanks for adding the detail about the Civilian casualties. Would the Museum of Hartlepool know where I could access information about those that were killed in the bombardment of 1914?

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    Museum of Hartlepool

    • 08/Jun/2011 13:04:03

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Hi. Thanks for highlighting the mistakes with the photographs of Girvan Terrace and letting us know where it was located.

  • profile

    Museum of Hartlepool

    • 08/Jun/2011 14:39:36

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] There is a war memorial on the Headland in Hartlepool but this only appears to feature some of the names of those that were killed. Follow this link for further information : www.newmp.org.uk/detail.php?contentId=7438#listlink This website lists 119 names : norfolk1515.com/Bombardment.html Mark Marsay's book 'Bombardment : The Day The East Coast Bled' details the raids on Scarborough and Whitby as well as Hartlepool and includes lists of those who died. Hope this helps!

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    Cluehunt

    • 09/Jul/2011 01:06:46

    Just goes to show history has a funny way of turning up things that you never new about. Just like in the second world war German planes did not want to bring there bombs hone with them so they off loaded them over Dublin. http://www.cluehunt.com