Sinking of a shaft from the Hetton Colliery at Carrington

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Sinking of a shaft from the Hetton Colliery at Carrington
Dated: 1877
Digital ID: 10036_a027000036
Rights: www.records.nsw.gov.au/about-us/rights-and-permissions

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Owner: State Archives NSW
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 3701
archives staterecordsnsw newsouthwales blackandwhite hunter river newcastle carrington hettoncolliery

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  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 28/Jan/2011 23:47:15

    Lesbians in 1890s Newcastle, NSW? Queen Victoria would never believe it - www.forteantimes.com/strangedays/mythbusters/353/victoria... !

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 29/Jan/2011 22:12:27

    [ ^ Apologies - too much nescafe. Again.] History of Newcastle Harbour - www.afloat.com.au/afloat-magazine/archive/2006_September2...

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 29/Jan/2011 22:14:18

    See also - [http://www.flickr.com/photos/uon/5203425768/] [http://www.flickr.com/photos/uon/3323650301/]

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    iain stuart

    • 30/Jan/2011 21:31:35

    Isn't that a coal mine? You can see the headframe and associate buildings - I'd say Ralph Snowball would be the photographer but would have to check this out.

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    john cowper

    • 31/Jan/2011 01:46:17

    Definitely coal wagons which compare favourably with beachcomber's pictorial suggestions

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    john cowper

    • 31/Jan/2011 02:01:37

    Here's a picture of the dyke at Carrington in 1901 if it helps [http://www.flickr.com/photos/uon/3324488260/in/set-72157622628357892/]

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    iain stuart

    • 31/Jan/2011 02:26:08

    Further research (i.e. I looked through some of my books) has identified this photo as being of the sinking of a shaft from the Hetton Colliery at Carrington in 1877. Another version is here www.flickr.com/photos/uon/5147551508/ The Dyke is in the background. Iain

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    State Archives NSW

    • 03/Feb/2011 01:07:15

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] [http://www.flickr.com/photos/johncowper] [http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] Thanks for your help here! Iain, we have updated the caption to "Sinking of a shaft from the Hetton Colliery at Carrington". AB

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    russellr50

    • 24/Oct/2013 13:22:11

    The shaft was about 85m (280ft) deep - the first 60m was sunk through water saturated sand and clay by forcing down a column of cast iron sections (tubbing). Each ring of tubbing was 3ft high, and weights ( sand bags and rails) were loaded on a platform on top to force the shaft lining down while the sand was dredged out of the bottom of the shaft. When the platform reached ground level the load was taken off and several more rings bolted together and the process repeated until the lower end of the shaft lining reached solid rock. A detailed description of the process was given by Danvers Powers in 1912. This photo show the tubbing with the loaded platform on top, and the headframe used to remove the spoil from inside the shaft lining. This was the only part of the Hetton Colliery where the workings were under land (& not very solid land) - all of the rest of the mine workings were under Newcastle harbour or the Pacific Ocean!