"Railway bridge, in an unidentified location" is likely on the Dublin/Drogheda line north of Amiens street, Dublin

Download this image

More from this collection

Related by Where

Support Pastpin!

Where: 23 Ossory Rd, North Dock, Dublin, Ireland

Try to find the spot where the photographer was standing.

When: 01 January 1890

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
Today another Hargrave image and yet another railway bridge but this time no known location! This looks like a fine piece of engineering and some excellent cast iron work. If it is still in place today then there may have been some changes but the distinctive cast iron features might still be there(?)

Following a few days, and some singular and amazing detective work from Eiretrains, it is confirmed that this railway bridge is on the Dublin and Drogheda Railway line, just north of Amiens Street (Connolly) station. Specifically, this bridge spans the Royal Canal and Ossory Road on Dublin's northside. The decorative cast-iron flourishes and many structural elements of the bridge are gone, but some of the stonework in particular remains....


Photographer: Joshua H. Hargrave

Collection: Joshua H. Hargrave Collection

Date: ca.1890

NLI Ref.: HAR146

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 16348
nationallibraryofireland railwaybridge castiron ornate cables electricwires bridge railwaysignal tracks unknownlocation joshuehhargrave joshuahhargravecollection points signal chevron dublinanddroghedarailway amiensstreetstation ossoryroad dublin amiensstreetnorth royalcanal greatnorthernrailwayireland gnri northernrailwayofireland latticetruss 1845 sirjohnmacneill locationidentified

Add Tags
  • profile

    swordscookie back and trying to catch up!

    • 14/Jun/2016 07:43:01

    I was thinking Memorial Bridge (?) in Dublin City Centre but it looks too short for that?

  • profile

    Carol Maddock

    • 14/Jun/2016 08:16:54

    *cough* Hargrave not Hargreave.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 14/Jun/2016 08:22:43

    It looks as if there are points near the camera, suggesting that this is the whole bridge - quite short all right.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 14/Jun/2016 08:32:10

    Looks a bit forrin to me.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 14/Jun/2016 08:51:15

    I'm going to stick my neck out and say that the distant signal with a swallow-tail and a bobble and spike on top is a GWR feature and we should maybe be looking in the UK.

  • profile

    swordscookie back and trying to catch up!

    • 14/Jun/2016 09:25:25

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Humph!

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 14/Jun/2016 09:27:24

    Hargrave has a pic of the Forth bridges, and some from as far away as Vienna in his collection.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 14/Jun/2016 09:30:02

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] These early(ish) mornings are getting to me, I need a break:-) All corrected now thank you for the guidance and pay no attention to the Cookie, he's still celebrating the three Irish teams wins at the weekend!

  • profile

    Carol Maddock

    • 14/Jun/2016 09:37:41

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] And he is getting on a bit, so we have to make allowances! :)

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 14/Jun/2016 09:41:33

    Hmm. Callander and Oban and S&DJR both also favour ball and spike finials.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 14/Jun/2016 10:46:11

    It seems a distant signal with a bar instead of a chevron is not in fact British or Irish (or American or Australian) but could be italian: mysite.du.edu/~etuttle/rail/ital.htm Edit: Or maybe it's just old: www.railsigns.uk/sect2page4/sect2page4.html

  • profile

    robinparkes

    • 14/Jun/2016 11:08:31

    I'm wondering if it could be continental for, if the signal is facing the train (for the signal arm is the other side of the post), it appears that the trains run on the right (left in this photo) rather than the left. I also get the impression that there is a junction for each line has a set of points. BTW I haven't a notion where it could be.

  • profile

    Melinda Stuart

    • 14/Jun/2016 11:12:29

    The decorative element is amazing. . . .

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 14/Jun/2016 11:49:35

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Good point.

  • profile

    Carol Maddock

    • 14/Jun/2016 13:37:21

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Do you think is there any way this might need flipping horizontally? I can't see anything in the photo (crest, etc.) that'd show it definitely is the right or the wrong way around, and sometimes confusion arises around lantern and other slides. Unless resident railway buffs can see something around the tracks or sleepers or ties that prove it's the right way around?

  • profile

    robinparkes

    • 14/Jun/2016 13:50:34

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] A good suggestion. I've flipped it horizontally and looked at the original size but, as you say, there are no identifying marks to help us.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 14/Jun/2016 13:55:50

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] I tried that too, but the magnification actually supports the continental thesis: It looks like a french railway building at the far end of the bridge with a load of external beams in the gable.

  • profile

    A. P. L.

    • 14/Jun/2016 14:25:00

    If it is in France or Belgium or places like that, chances are it was subsequently destroyed during one of the wars...... This ones going to be a challenge to identify!

  • profile

    Yaroslav Gerzhedovich

    • 14/Jun/2016 16:17:59

    Thank you for the link to the Joshua H. Hargrave Collection - it's incredible.

  • profile

    robinparkes

    • 14/Jun/2016 16:30:34

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] I was thinking that the bolts just don't look like what we would expect here or in Britain.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 14/Jun/2016 23:18:26

    Thanks all for the inputs today. We had considered that this one might be a toughie. There isn't much to go on other than the bridge itself and the large scroll work. Not helped by, as [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] points-out, the potential for mirroring/flipping issues with the lantern slide scans. We will hold out hope however - we've been consistently amazed by the "Mission Impossible" style finds in the past, and could yet be surprised on this one. Perhaps [https://www.flickr.com/photos/flyingsnail] or [https://www.flickr.com/photos/kevin-staddon] or [https://www.flickr.com/photos/metrovick] or other previous contributors to rail-history images might have some notions....

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 15/Jun/2016 06:28:42

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Yep. Irish railways have a sabot on every sleeper, whereas these appear to be bolted directly to the sleepers and there's only sabots on the points.

  • profile

    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 15/Jun/2016 13:02:26

    looks vaguely Eiffel-ish, Gustave. There seems to be a telegraph pole along the right of the image... No idea at this point though.

  • profile

    Eiretrains

    • 17/Jun/2016 00:30:43

    This on the Dublin-Belfast line, more specific it is the original Dublin & Drogheda Railway bridge just north of Amiens St (Connolly Station) which spans the Royal Canal and the Midland Great Western's 'Liffey Branch' (now Docklands line). The house just visible to the left is one of the terrace houses on Ossory Road. In the distance is one of the former Great Northern Railway signal cabins, possibly the named 'Amiens Street North' signal cabin. The view, looking north from Amiens St station, pre-dates the construction of the 'Drumcondra Link Line' bridge of c1904-6, which nowadays exists to the left of the bridge. I've been fascinating with this picture for a few years now and it took a lot of detective work to figure out the location, certainly a challenging one! The bridge spans still exist (or replaced by a spartan structure, it's not too clear), but the fancy ornate designs at the ends as well as the high side lattice frames are long gone. Similar fancy ends to the bridge spans were prepared for the D&DR viaduct in Drogheda, and despite appearing in the original proposed drawings, they were never built. The little low wall just to the bottom left of the picture can still be seen today.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 17/Jun/2016 05:08:05

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/flyingsnail] Brilliant stuff, Ciarán! Streetview looking up at the bridge from Ossory Road.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 17/Jun/2016 06:15:30

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/flyingsnail] Amazing. I was convinced it was continental. The only slight uneasiness I had was with the track width, but I assumed that was a foreshortening artefact. Well done!

  • profile

    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 17/Jun/2016 12:57:00

    nicely done! [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] from the Streetview it appears the ornamental iron work is long gone.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 17/Jun/2016 15:17:12

    Amazing stuff [https://www.flickr.com/photos/flyingsnail] - though we never doubted for a minute that if anyone could identify/pinpoint this one that it would likely be your good self! Have updated the description and map to reflect. Very very well done. We need to work on our recognition system - but for now here's some virtual flowers (and rolling stock) courtesy of Meridith112 www.flickr.com/photos/meridithb/26481537023/

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 18/Jun/2016 06:10:18

    Well done [https://www.flickr.com/photos/flyingsnail] No. 20 Ossery Rd was the end of terrace house before 21-23 were built. It has its windows above one another and the down pipe, barge, curved window headers and pronounced dental brickwork on eaves as per photo are still evident. Pink house in this Streetview. William Edward Bryson's 1845 sketch of proposed Boyne Viaduct showing similar squiggly detail and lattice work. www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/27134623944/in/datepos...

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/Jun/2016 23:36:10

    Thanks [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] - it is indeed impressive squiggly detail :) One wonders if that decorative ironwork was melted down at a later date. (Perhaps in the war years when certain metals were harder to come by - and in demand for more practical purposes by the rail companies...)

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 19/Jun/2016 08:37:49

    I see in NLI's biog of Hargrave that he worked as a "railway engineer for the Great Northern Railway, in its Dublin office".....which was at Amiens Street. catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000289138

  • profile

    Eiretrains

    • 19/Jun/2016 16:58:29

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] That's great spotting that, I hadn't noticed how the terrace was extended! Next time I'm there I will look a closer look.

  • profile

    Eiretrains

    • 19/Jun/2016 17:02:53

    Just another thing to add, there's an illustration of this bridge showing the side elevation, it was published in IRRS Journal No.67 (June 1975).