40 ton concrete blocks, general view, men at work.

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Where: Clyde House, Custom House Quay, Waterford, Ireland

Try to find the spot where the photographer was standing.

When: 01 January 1948

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
Reading this title without sight of the shot I had visions of enormous masses of concrete. Instead we see what was once a familiar sight where concrete was mixed on-site and even blocks were made locally! A fine and unusual Poole shot with men at work.

With thanks to today's contributions, the consensus is that this is likely construction (likely of the P&T exchange building) behind the main Post Office building (Custom House) off the Waterford quays. Whatever these hard-working men were building, there's been some interesting in-site (pun intended) on the machinery and methods in use....


Photographer: A. H. Poole

Collection: Poole Photographic Studio, Waterford

Date:28 September 1948

NLI Ref: POOLEWP 4593

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 11717
ahpoole arthurhenripoole glassnegative nationallibraryofireland concrete waterford construction menatwork stationaryengine austink2 postoffice cementmixer guagebox workers cement tripod bricks blocks keyserstreet keizerstreet exchangestreet concreteblocks exchange piledriving poolephotographiccollection

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  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 22/Apr/2016 07:25:32

    Poole, eh? I'll guess Waterford.

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    derangedlemur

    • 22/Apr/2016 07:28:40

    GPO rebuilding, apparently: catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000595255

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    derangedlemur

    • 22/Apr/2016 07:31:54

    This yoke, maybe: www.google.ie/maps/@52.2608939,-7.1087032,3a,75y,321.3h,8...

  • profile

    Foxglove

    • 22/Apr/2016 07:38:01

    the detail in this photo is outstanding

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 22/Apr/2016 07:48:23

    Keyzer's lane isn't inconsistent with the map, anyway: maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V2,660848,612543,12,9

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    Vab2009

    • 22/Apr/2016 08:53:17

    Love the men in the background watching the photographer!

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    Vab2009

    • 22/Apr/2016 08:54:43

    I did not realise that the GPO rebuild was so recent.

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    j.coffey78

    • 22/Apr/2016 09:40:56

    "Any chance of the start"

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Apr/2016 09:48:01

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/vab2009] The Waterford GPO Viv! The other one was rebuilt in the 20's AFAIK

  • profile

    swordscookie back and trying to catch up!

    • 22/Apr/2016 09:56:11

    I'm trying to figure out what is driving that mixer? I see an electric cable nearby but that would not seem practical on a building site in most cases.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 22/Apr/2016 09:57:16

    The lorry / van in the background is an Austin K2 - www.trucksplanet.com/catalog/model.php?id=1705 [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/8364961649/]

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 22/Apr/2016 10:19:37

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie] Is the box on top of the mixer frame a generator?

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 22/Apr/2016 13:44:36

    Long time since I saw guage boxes being used. The extension [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] streetviewed (sic) was built in the 20's...twenty years earlier??? ---according to the Nah Nah Ni Nah Nah............. :) It looks like they're using Lister Stationary engines to drive the pile driving winches and an electric motor to drive the mixer. www.flickr.com/photos/pete_edgeler/14181342228/in/photoli... [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] Why did you put a hyphen in 'in-site' in your blurb above?

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    Omri Suissa

    • 22/Apr/2016 15:54:09

    Very good Thanks for sharing Like always National!

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Apr/2016 22:14:12

    Thanks all - Have updated the tags and mapped this to the area around Keyzer's Lane for now. If not the 1920/30s addition behind the earler post office (Custom House) building, do we think the work could be on the P&T exchange building at the other side of the "block" on Exchange Street? Whatever the case, hopefully everyone's weekends are a little less arduous than what Poole captures here :)

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    guliolopez

    • 22/Apr/2016 23:14:40

    If the building work is indeed near the Waterford GPO (as the other related image label suggests), then it seems quite plausible that the lads are indeed working on the (then) new P&T exchange building. According to this article from the Munster Express, it was opened in 1952. One imagines it took at least 3 or 4 years to construct all 5 stories of the "Most Modern Exchange in the Country": www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/26310807270/

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    Asdeewest

    • 22/Apr/2016 23:24:02

    They are piling foundations. You can see the tripods and casing liners on the ground.

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    O Mac

    • 23/Apr/2016 00:18:46

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] You have to be right. It has to be the exchange they are building... That arched doorway on the right can be seen as this entrance on the 25" OSI... I notice the street was called Exchange Street before this exchange was ever built? The Déisi must have been exchanging stuff there for years beforehand. EDIT [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Had I refreshed my screen I would have seen your comment before I ever wondered why it was called Exchange Street. Thanks.

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    KenjiB_48

    • 23/Apr/2016 00:20:01

    The gent with his hands behind him on the right side makes me think of an architect or clerk of the works...

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    ofarrl

    • 23/Apr/2016 00:36:34

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] that might be John Clancy, owner of the company that built the exchange.

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    KenjiB_48

    • 23/Apr/2016 00:41:34

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Ah - very likely. Thanks.

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    ofarrl

    • 23/Apr/2016 00:58:56

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] Unfortunately The original exchange is just one of many historic buildings lost to Waterford over the years. You can see a glimpse of the exchange in this painting from 1773 by William Van der Hagen, it's the building with 5 arches just to left of center.

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    O Mac

    • 23/Apr/2016 09:29:58

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Thanks Paul. It looked similiar to the exchange also lost to Cork and a row of Tuscan columns in the wall surrounding St Mary’s graveyard is all that's left of the Limerick Exchange.. Shame...