Abbey Street corner, Hibernian Bank shelled

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Where: 12 O'Connell Street Lower, North City, Dublin 1, Ireland

Try to find the spot where the photographer was standing.

When: 01 January 1916

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
Following the image of Sean MacDiarmada yesterday we continue with another image from 1916. The Hibernian Bank facade on the corner of Abbey St. and O'Connell street stands in the midst of the destruction wrought during the Rising! Few of us imagined the centre of Dublin to have been so badly destroyed and would associate that level of devastation with WW2 images of Coventry, London, Berlin, Dresden or Hamburg.

This is 12-13 Lower O’Connell Street, Dublin and from Archiseek we get the following - 1872 Shops & dwellings, for J.G. Mooney. Constructed in Dalkey granite & Portland stone, it was converted into a branch of the Hibernian Bank in 1878, and destroyed in the Easter Rising of 1916.

Public Armed Ship Muirchú was a ship in the Irish Naval Service. She was the former Royal Navy ship HMY Helga and was involved in shelling Liberty Hall in Dublin from the River Liffey with her pair of 12-pounder naval guns during the Easter Rising of 1916.

Helga was purchased by the Irish Free State in 1923 and renamed Muirchú (Irish: Hound of the Sea).

She sank off the Wexford coast after disposal in 1947.

Thanks to beachcomberaustralia O Mac Niall McAuley for the details, and with some content from Wikipedia.

Photographer: Brendan Keogh

Collection: Keogh Photographic Collection

Date: Between Mon 24th April and 17th May 1916

NLI Ref: KE 118

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 29091
brendankeogh thekeoghphotographiccollection keoghbrothersltd nationallibraryofireland 1916thehibernianbank façade abbeyst sackvillestreet dublin codublin leinster 1213lowero’connellstreet archiseek shopsdwellings jgmooney 1872 dalkeygranite portlandstone hibernianbank 1878 destroyed easterrisingof1916 publicarmedshipmuirchú irishnavalservice royalnavyshiphmyhelga shelling libertyhall riverliffey 12poundernavalguns houndofthesea disposalin1947 oconnellstreet 1916rising

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  • profile

    D.G-S

    • 19/Feb/2016 08:29:33

    unimaginable!

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 19/Feb/2016 08:39:35

    I think this is the right spot - streetview - goo.gl/maps/q3D8PHUpVhr Edit: Or maybe a bit further back to include Sir John Gray's statue - goo.gl/maps/KuyKpzxtFhS2 Streetview around O'Connell Street has gone beserk!

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    Niall McAuley

    • 19/Feb/2016 09:07:35

    OSI 25" link

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    philipgmayer

    • 19/Feb/2016 10:33:13

    Don't forget Liverpool also suffered major bomb damage.

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    O Mac

    • 19/Feb/2016 10:49:49

    In this Thomas Westropp photograph taken from the pillar and dated 18th May 1916, the remaining ruins of the Hibernian bank above have been demolished. So taken between Mon 24th April and 18th May 1916. Edit: Another Westropp from the day before (17th May) showing men within the rubble of the demolished bank. So Pre 17th May 1916 objects.dri.ie/ie.dri.production.95947816w/959478175_full...

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    Vab2009

    • 19/Feb/2016 12:00:08

    That really does look like WW2 damage. I have always tended to think of the just the GPO being so badly damaged. There must have been quite a lot of heavy weapons used.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 19/Feb/2016 12:04:59

    18 pounder guns, including those on the gunship Helga on the Liffey.

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 19/Feb/2016 13:49:43

    wow. I wasn't aware there was such damage.

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    O Mac

    • 19/Feb/2016 15:32:01

    archiseek

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 19/Feb/2016 17:12:33

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] I never knew that the Helga was acquired by the Free State.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 19/Feb/2016 17:38:00

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/vab2009] Most of the shells that were fired were said to be incendiaries and they started fires in the old Georgian buildings in central Dublin!

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 19/Feb/2016 21:08:58

    The best description I could find of what actually happened specifically at the Hibernian Bank is here - comeheretome.com/2010/06/04/another-unusual-dublin-plaque... - press the "more" button at the end. The website is about a plaque for Captain Thomas Weafer who was killed there on Wednesday 26/4/1916, just before the fire which began on Thursday 27/4/1916. A couple of relevant quotes from the above link - The strategic importance of the building is clear. It allowed Weafer and his men to control access to the street from Amiens Street Station for example, and members of the the GPO Garrison were occupying a number of buildings on each side of Sackville Street. Some time on Thursday a barricade which stretched from the Royal Hibernian Academy to a cycle shop - I think the name of it was Keating’s, on the opposite side of the street, took fire as a result of a direct shell hit. It was the firing of this barricade that caused the fire which wiped out the east side of O’Connell St. I saw that happen myself. I saw the barricade being hit, I saw the fire consuming it and I saw Keating’s going up. Then Hoyt’s caught fire, and when Hoyt’s caught fire the whole block up to Earl St. became involved. Hoyt’s had a lot of turpentine and other inflammable stuff, and I saw the fire spread from there to Clery’s. Clery’s and the Imperial Hotel were one and the same building, and this building was ignited from the fire which consumed Hoyt’s (…..) I had the extraordinary experience of seeing the huge plate-glass windows of Clery’s stores run molten into the channel from the terrific heat. [witness statement WS340 from the Bureau of Military History]

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 19/Feb/2016 21:46:32

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] Fascinating stuff, watching glass melt and run like butter must have been a sight to see!

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    Vab2009

    • 19/Feb/2016 23:10:28

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] Thanks for that. That would explain the devastation.

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    waewduan4

    • 20/Feb/2016 13:44:15

    Greetings !!

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 20/Feb/2016 20:48:50

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/eyelightfilms] Those are interesting. It is very noticeable how the General Public are NOT present in the NLI photo, implying an earlier date when still under martial law. The soldier bottom right is giving the photographer a 'wtf-r-u-doing' look (see megazoom).

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 20/Feb/2016 21:10:36

    Also via megazoom (how did we ever live without it ?!), the statue of Sir John Gray (extreme right) has bullet and shrapnel scars on the pedestal, but not on the statue. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Gray_(Irish_politician)

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    Niall McAuley

    • 21/Feb/2016 07:53:13

    In this zoomed streetview of the O'Connell Monument, you can see that one of the angels has bullet wounds to this day!

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    Owen J Fitzpatrick

    • 22/Feb/2016 10:56:49

    Looks like Stalingrad. I do a lot of shooting on O'Connell Street. Can't believe the damage to the Abbey Lower Street area. Superb post.