Labourers' Cottages

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Where: Unknown

Try to find the spot where the photographer was standing.

When: 01 January 1900

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
Quite a bit different from the temporary "Labourer's Hut" we saw from Friday's shot, this Mason image is labelled simply "Labourers' Cottages". Do we think there's enough to go-on to determine where the shot was taken?


Photographer: TH Mason

Contributor: Thomas H. Mason & Sons photographers

Collection: Mason Photographic Collection

Date: c.1890-1910

NLI Ref: M57/31

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 13297
masonphotographiccollection thomasholmesmason nationallibraryofireland cottage thomashmasonsons masonsons labourerscottages landacts unknownlocation land labour associ

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    sharon.corbet

    • 07/Dec/2015 08:51:43

    Labourers' Cottages.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 07/Dec/2015 08:55:12

    Bit of a seaside smell to this one.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 07/Dec/2015 12:17:35

    Apologies, we had an issue with the sync on the description and labels this morning. With thanks to [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] and [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] for establishing the catalogue references in the meantime, we've since updated the description....

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    guliolopez

    • 07/Dec/2015 20:15:39

    This was probably one of many labourers' cottages built under some of the turn of the century acts. I couldn't say where these are. Because the country is littered with them. The 1881/1882 acts provided for the building of a lot of these. Mainly to address a lot of the probems we've discussed in the recent "evictions" series. A series of acts were passed between the 1880s and the 1930s, specifically with the intent of improving living conditions for agricultural labourers - local authorities were therefore involved in locating and compulsorily purchasing sites, building cottages and housing people. Tens of thousands of simple labourers cottages of this type were built all over the country. About the only thing that looks different for these ones is the second/dormer story - most were very simple one-storey buildings to pretty much the same plan. And the (newly en-vogue) water butt. If someone recognised the plan/form of this house we might be able to narrow down a county (as many local authorities and poor law unions built from their own plans). But otherwise it might be needle in a countryside of haystacks... (See Land & Labour Association#Cottage ownership and Land Acts#Labourers Act 1906 - both Wikipedia).

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 07/Dec/2015 23:35:58

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/2072750[email protected]] We have a variation on a theme in the Claddagh here in Galway. These are known locally as "exservicemens houses" built under the "Irish Land (Provision for Sailors and Soldiers) Act 1919"

  • profile

    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 08/Dec/2015 00:54:27

    looks like a nice place, wonder if it's still around?

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 08/Dec/2015 01:19:20

    I would bet money it's still standing. But I can't think of a way to find it yet....

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 08/Dec/2015 11:01:46

    Thanks all - for the same reasons noted above, we thought that perhaps this might be a toughie. The only thing perhaps to go on was that the photo seemed a little "staged" - perhaps shortly after the homes were newly built. (We say that as the downstairs and upstairs window boxes would seem to indicate "dressing" for the photo). Although perhaps those who moved in were so house-proud in their new digs that they kept it spick and span - and perhaps that is what caught the Mason photographer's eye. Anyway, we've updated the tags for now, and will wait with baited breath to see if anyone can come up with a strategy for divining location....

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 17/Dec/2015 10:57:01

    It reminds me of this one in Malahide: www.google.ie/maps/@53.4489644,-6.1557741,3a,75y,128.36h,... There's even the same iron railings behind that hedge. Maybe whoever built it had been inspired by these cottages.

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    derangedlemur

    • 18/Dec/2015 09:39:46

    Here's another one in Clondalkin that seems not unrelated: www.google.ie/maps/@53.3307632,-6.3965216,3a,75y,184.88h,...

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    Niall McAuley

    • 18/Dec/2015 09:53:04

    Following my nose to the seaside, I see this in Rosslare, which is close, but no cigar.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/Dec/2015 20:48:19

    Brilliant [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] and [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley]. Thanks for sticking with it :) For some reason the style and landscape (the little of it we can see) suggests perhaps east- rather than west-coast. Who knows, we might get confirmation yet...

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    derangedlemur

    • 18/Dec/2015 23:10:40

    The style looks familiar but I can't place it. I'll get it yet, though.

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    Sunny Harry

    • 19/Dec/2015 18:11:26

    There is a water butt at the side. This probably means the soil is sandy, and it must be beside the sea somewhere.

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    derangedlemur

    • 20/Dec/2015 09:51:37

    According to a document about roof conservation that I found, the flat pitch of the roofs means that the roofs are made of big bits of welsh slate, which at the time these would have been built would place them beside a port, probably on the east or south coast.

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    derangedlemur

    • 20/Dec/2015 16:00:13

    I'm not sure it is east coast. All the adjacent records look like the west.

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    derangedlemur

    • 21/Dec/2015 08:43:56

    The vast amount of mayweed suggests it's somewhere in these areas: bsbi.org/maps/?taxonid=2cd4p9h.ffr

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    Greg Carey

    • 22/Dec/2015 12:50:57

    Are you definitely sure this is in Ireland?

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    Greg Carey

    • 22/Dec/2015 14:56:52

    Although the fact that there are shamrocks on the flower pots does indicate it's most likely in Ireland!

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    derangedlemur

    • 23/Dec/2015 13:22:53

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gregcarey] I was wondering about that. Maybe it was taken for the shamrocks.

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    derangedlemur

    • 23/Dec/2015 13:26:31

    Maybe not so western after all. M57/35 is just outside Trim. www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/23299329663/in/datepost...

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    derangedlemur

    • 24/Dec/2015 19:59:09

    Perhaps somewhere near Sion Mills. The architecture is starting to look similar: www.google.ie/maps/@54.784953,-7.474679,3a,90y,324.72h,77...

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    derangedlemur

    • 19/Sep/2017 13:26:22

    Other not dissimilar places: Cushendun: www.google.ie/maps/@55.125726,-6.042984,3a,75y,217.01h,76...