Parish Registers for Nenagh, Co. Tipperary

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Where: 25 Kenyon St, Nenagh South, Nenagh, Co. Tipperary, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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Listed in the catalogue as "Street, Nenagh, Co Tipperary", we selected this image (with others to follow later) to highlight the Parish Registers at NLI launch.

We wondered whether anyone in this turn-of-the-century image was listed in the registers for the parish of Nenagh? Were the shopkeeping Hogan or Ryan families baptised locally? Or, after their marriages were recorded in the register, did many newly weds retire to the Railway Hotel for their reception?

With thanks to sharon.corbet and guliolopez, we not only confirmed the location and info on the Ryan and Hogan families from the Barrack Street Census, but crucially some likely candidates for the baptism records of Michael Ryan and Michael Hogan from the parish registers of May 1863 and March 1879

Thanks again all!

Contributor: Eason & Son

Collection: Eason Photographic

Date: ca 1900-1939

NLI Ref: EAS_3452

You can also view this image, and thousands of others, at the NLI’s catalogue

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 26328
eason easonson easoncollection easonphotographiccollection glassnegative 20thcentury nationallibraryofireland nenagh countytipperary catholicparishregistersatnli michaelryan michaelhogan bridgetryan countytown ireland munster hanoraryan locationidentified

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  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 13/Jul/2015 07:48:51

    From what I can tell, the Railway Hotel was on Barrack St. (now Kenyon St.) but the OSI is currently down, and I can't find a proper match on streetview. ETA: Spoke too soon Streetview

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    guliolopez

    • 13/Jul/2015 07:58:03

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] is correct I am sure (as usual) as we find the Hogan and the Ryan [edit - probably the wrong Ryans - see Sharon below for correction] shopkeeping families on Barrack Street in the 1911 census.

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 13/Jul/2015 08:03:02

    Michael Hogan in 1901Census as a Provision Merchant. Michael Ryan in 1901 Census though it's his mother who is a newsagent/publican while he's a Clerk.

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    guliolopez

    • 13/Jul/2015 08:11:56

    Michael Hogan is listed in the 1911 census as 48 y/o and the 1901 census as 37 y/o. This puts his birth date around 1863, and we also no from the census that he was baptised R/C. While there's no guarantee it's the same Michael Hogan, there is a baptism record for a Michael Hogan (born to Michael Hogan [Snr] and Honora Darcy) in the local parish registers from May of 1863. (About two-thirds down on the righthand page among the other baptisms of 15 May 1863).

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 13/Jul/2015 08:20:52

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Is it not this set of Ryans in 1911? 2 doors down from the Ryans?

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    guliolopez

    • 13/Jul/2015 08:22:46

    Still not certain of the relationship to the shop-keeping Hogan's of Barrack Street, but Michael Hogan [Snr] and Hanora Darcy had another son: Patrick. Or at least we find a baptism record for Patrick Hogan in March 1866 to undoubtedly the same parents. (Left-hand page about half-way down)

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    guliolopez

    • 13/Jul/2015 08:26:50

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] You're probably correct - lots of Ryans in that part of the world :) Which makes "finding the private Ryans" a little difficult. However, the Michael Ryan (who was the clerk in his mother Bridget's shop according to the 1901 and 1911 census) would have been born c.1879. And, we find a boy baptised by Michael and Bridget Ryan, as Michael Joseph Ryan in the records for March 1879. Again, no guarantees of the connection, but there they about 2/3 down on the left-hand page...

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 13/Jul/2015 08:50:05

    I found my Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grandfathers baptism in the register of the parish of Kingstown, Co.Dublin over the weekend!!

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 13/Jul/2015 09:12:11

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Here's Michael and Honora Hogan in the 1901 Census - there's no Michael living with them, so it doesn't rule them out being the parents of the shopkeeping Hogans. Theoretically it could also be this pair - Michael & "Mrs." Hogan, but with a daughter Nora.... There's also a Patrick Hogan of the right age in Nenagh too.

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    O Mac

    • 13/Jul/2015 10:11:58

    Shadows of the photographers/developers hair can be seen across the top and top right of picture ?

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 13/Jul/2015 18:58:13

    Thanks to all for the usual sleuthing - especially to [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] and [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] for the location and nuggets from the Registers!

  • profile

    guliolopez

    • 13/Jul/2015 19:05:29

    For anyone using the Registers website as a resource, you might find it useful to refer to an index - like the LDS index search - to aid in refining a date or month. While the reasons for maintaining these records might seem a little strange to some, they are a useful resource for cross referencing and refining a search in other sources.

  • profile

    Carol Maddock

    • 13/Jul/2015 21:18:22

    A Mrs Carroll ran the Railway Hotel at 12/13 Barrack Street in the late 19th century. She was retiring from the business and tried to sell her “Right, Title, and Interest" by auction a couple of times — in July 1897 (Leinster Express and September 1899 (Nenagh News). This attempt must have been successful, as the hotel is being referred to as Mrs McCarthy’s Railway Hotel by June 1901 (Nenagh News) when a branch of the American Dental Association visited the hotel every second Wednesday. The paper is very discreet about the technicalities of their “new and improved departure in dental surgery”, and not entirely clear when talking about “gratuitous treatment” — free or unnecessary?! More detail on this by September 1905, when the Hotel is still spoken of as McCarthy’s (Nenagh Guardian). The generous dentists? technicians? were now visiting every other Thursday. Messrs J. and G. Simons were from Stanley’s Teeth Institute of Lower Mount Street in Dublin. Full sets of false teeth cost from 21s, and you could get a single tooth from 2s 6d, and “extractions of stumps not always necessary”...

  • profile

    guliolopez

    • 13/Jul/2015 23:34:11

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Indeed - I noticed this ad in the Nenagh Guardian (announcing a change in ownership in 1912) www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/19646194836/

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 14/Jul/2015 04:52:03

    We had a couple of baptisms already, so here's a marriage - Michael Ryan and Bridget Ryan on February 14 1878 in Silvermines. (Third down on the left side.)

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    guliolopez

    • 14/Jul/2015 09:29:09

    And to follow that thread, following marriage and baptism, we find the obituary of Hanora Hogan (nee Darcy; mother of Michael) in local Nenagh paper in 1919: www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/19688483871/ And, unfortunately for Michael, he had a tough time of it in the years that followed - with the commandeering of premises by the "authorities" (report from local Nenagh paper in 1922): www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/19061388894/in/photost...

  • profile

    Carol Maddock

    • 14/Jul/2015 19:58:16

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] I wonder if he was able to get compensation later? Michael Hogan had put a notice in the Nenagh Guardian to let his friends and customers know that because of the commandeering, he was moving and re-opening his business at no. 2 Kenyon Street from 7 January 1921. (And that he would be selling the best brands of American, Irish, and Canadian Bacon, plus puddings and sausages &c.)

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    Niall McAuley

    • 28/Jan/2016 17:34:14

    I could be convinced that one of the posters in the window says MIRROR - WATCHING FOR GERMAN SUBMARINES

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    Niall McAuley

    • 28/Jan/2016 17:41:07

    ...and searching here for that phrase in the Mirror, I see an image of the superstructure of a military ship which matches the mushroom shape on that poster which is dated Fri 4 Jun 1915. Anyone with a newspaper archive account [ahem ahem] could check the Irish Times (the left hand poster, I think) for that period for stories about PRINCE ... STOPPED ... GEORGE ... EXPULSION

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 28/Jan/2016 17:45:31

    Hmm, not EXPULSION, maybe MILITARY COMPULSION?

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 28/Jan/2016 17:49:02

    GEORGE could be Lloyd George, there's a story about him called LLOYD GEORGE AND MUNITIONS

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    Niall McAuley

    • 29/Jan/2016 09:04:44

    See what you think: Mirror

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 29/Jan/2016 23:51:53

    Excellent sleuthing and megazooming [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] - seems like a very likely match to the story, date and newspaper/poster image to me!