US diesels arrive, North Wall, Co. Dublin

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Where: Tom Clarke Bridge, Dublin, Ireland

Try to find the spot where the photographer was standing.

When: 01 January 1961

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
This was the beginning of a change from British to US locomotives in the CIE livery. As the mighty Wikipedia states:
From the early 60s, CIE looked to GM, with their history of reliability. 15 121 Class were purchased in 1961. These were modified shunting locos ("switchers") and proved an instant success (more in the comment from swordscookie below) .

OwenMacC Tells us that on the same day as this photo was taken John F. Kennedy was formally elected the 35th President of the United States.

Photographer: James P. O'Dea

Collection: James P. O'Dea

Date: January 04 1961

NLI Ref.: ODEA 23/9

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 16692
jamespo’dea o’deaphotographiccollection nationallibraryofireland no124 iarnrodeireann iarnrodeireannlivery dublin northwall leinster ireland irishtractiongroup westclarerailwaymoyastacoclare generalmotors usbuilt 1961 jan4th1961 jfk johnfkennedy formallyelected shuntinglocos switchers 121class 40yearlifetime cie córasiompairéireann

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  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 23/Apr/2015 08:01:33

    No. 124 features on the wikipedia page in Iarnrod Eireann livery. It was only withdrawn from service in 2008. It has been preserved by the Irish Traction Group and is now at West Clare Railway, Moyasta, Co. Clare. (There are more photos showing no. 124 over its 40+ year lifetime with CIE).

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    sharon.corbet

    • 23/Apr/2015 08:04:05

    www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/6633962763/ Being unloaded.

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    swordscookie back and trying to catch up!

    • 23/Apr/2015 08:32:50

    This was the beginning of a change from British to US locomotives in the CIE livery. As the mighty Wikipedia states: From the early 60s, CIE looked to GM, with their history of reliability. 15 121 Class were purchased in 1961. These were modified shunting locos ("switchers") and proved an instant success. One drawback was the single cab construction requiring the loco to be turned at the end of each journey as the drivers refused to operate them "long hood" forward. They were modified in the mid-1970s for multiple unit operation and operated in consist, "long hood" to "long hood", with their cabs at each end. 37 141 Class, delivered in 1962, were fitted with two cabs to overcome this problem. The delivery of these engines brought an end to regular steam working in April 1963. A third batch of GM locomotives (181 Class) were delivered in 1966, which were essentially 141s with 1,100 h.p. engines. Having experienced GM's reliability, CIE decided in 1964 to fit higher-powered engines in both Class 001 and Class 201 locos. However, GM would only sell complete engine / generator assemblies and would not provide engines on their own. They finally agreed in 1967 to supply engines to enable re-engining of the Class 001. The trials were a total success and over the next four years, all 94 Metrovicks were fitted with replacement EMD 645 engines. Eighteen new GM locomotives were delivered in 1977. Visually resembling a stretched 141/181 Class, the new locomotives had a Co-Co wheel arrangement and were of significantly higher power, 2,475 h.p. The 071 Class with its higher speed and power went on to become the principal passenger locomotive on the Irish railway network for the next twenty years. The new 201 Class, again built by GM, superseded them in 1994–1995. These are currently the heaviest, fastest and most powerful diesel locomotives operating in Ireland (112 tons, max. speed 102 mph and 3,200 hp).

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    O Mac

    • 23/Apr/2015 13:26:59

    John F. Kennedy was formally elected the 35th President of the United States on Wed, January 4th 1961.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 23/Apr/2015 16:37:54

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Good afternoon, you know I cannot function without the help of a street view or an OSI reference :)

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    swordscookie back and trying to catch up!

    • 23/Apr/2015 18:23:02

    Now this is something I am not good at but here goes:-) www.google.ie/maps/place/N+Wall+Quay,+Dublin/@53.34736,-6...

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 23/Apr/2015 20:05:26

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie] Thanks Sean.

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    O Mac

    • 23/Apr/2015 20:40:06

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] I believe the photograph was taken on the North Wall Extension beyond the Point Depot. The shadows tell us the engine is on the quay side (south side) of the shed and the only place with twin tracks on the quay side of a shed was here. maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V1,718348,734362,7,9 It was also where the 100ton travelling crane used to be. (One of its legs is seen in the photo [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] linked) It would have been behind the cameraman. catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000306538 A ship of this size wouldn't have had the water to go much further up the liffey.

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 24/Apr/2015 02:47:58

    railroad overload! great stuff. A GL8 model. Measuring 36 feet 2 inches over the end sills, they are equipped an EMD 8-567CR engine producing 875 hp (652 kW) for traction, driving four traction motors in either A1A-A1A or B-B flexicoil trucks

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    Eiretrains

    • 25/Apr/2015 19:40:38

    When these locomotives arrived they had white sand from the Illinois Desert in their sandboxes (used for wheel adhesion). As the locomotive was an American design, on railroads, sand could be loaded from an elevated position from a sand-tower, and you can see the cap opening for entering sand at the bonnet end of locomotive B124, visible at the end of the handrail. Naturally this posed problems for CIÉ, as with no sand-towers, the only way to add sand was to climb the side of the locomotive and scoop a handful of sand from a bucket load and drop it through the open cap. Not too long after delivery, the opening for sand was removed to a more conventional lower position on the locomotive, and you will see in later pictures of these locomotives (below), the original entry was removed. www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/15127212376/in/photol...