Lieutenant Storey (or more likely Stoney?)

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Where: Unknown

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When: 01 January 1888

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
Can we find out more about our young man? This studio portrait was probably taken in the 1880s when Lieutenant Storey/Stoney was based at one of the Barracks in Waterford city. He may have been from Kilkenny...

Photographer: Poole Photographic Studios, Waterford

Date: 1880s??

NLI Ref: POOLEWP 0692

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 54614
lieutenantstorey bearskin busby soldier uniform sword gloves 19thcentury crests ahpoole arthurhenripoole glassnegative nationallibraryofireland royalirishfusiliers fulldress britisharmy victorian regiment regimental poolephotographiccollection

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    derangedlemur

    • 06/Jan/2014 08:51:10

    Once upon a time there was a bear... Doesn't seem to have ended well for him.

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    derangedlemur

    • 06/Jan/2014 09:04:49

    He seems to be a Royal Scot

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 06/Jan/2014 09:26:45

    Without the busby - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/P_WP_0691/Image?lookfor=http://ww...

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    mogey

    • 06/Jan/2014 09:28:41

    looking at the original photo size he appears to be attempting to grow a mousetache (not very successfully)

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    derangedlemur

    • 06/Jan/2014 10:09:33

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/mogey] But I thought it was Teh Rulez!

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    John Spooner

    • 06/Jan/2014 11:01:01

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/mogey] [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] The moustache was "a mark of the British soldier, whether it was the newly joined ploughboy's youthful wisp of straw-coloured hair or the cognita canities of the veteran with a long record of service under tropic suns" according to the London Times when the regulation to make top-lip shaving optional in 1916 (Oct 7). I think Lieutenant Story falls under the former category.

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    derangedlemur

    • 06/Jan/2014 11:27:11

    There's no Storeys in Kilkenny by 1901.

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    derangedlemur

    • 06/Jan/2014 11:31:50

    Is he definitely Storey? Stoney, Thomas Ramsay, 35, 10th April 1918, 3rd Bn. attd. 6th Bn. King's Own Scottish Borderers, Second Lieutenant, Adjt., Born at Dungarvan, Co. Waterford. Son of Maj. George Ormonde Stoney, (K.O.S.B.) and Meylia Stoney; husband of Dorothy Agnes Stoney, of Stokelake House, Chudleigh, Devon. LA CLYTTE MILITARY CEMETERY, IV. A. 19 35 would be too young but he could be the dad (also KSOB).

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 06/Jan/2014 11:47:16

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] He's definitely Storey in our catalogue However, we've unearthed spelling errors in, or transcription errors from, the Poole Studios day books before...

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    derangedlemur

    • 06/Jan/2014 11:52:06

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] The death notice is correctly spelled, btw waterfordsdead.shaunmcguire.co.uk/images/headstones/Stone...

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    John Spooner

    • 06/Jan/2014 12:31:21

    A Lieutenant George Ormond (without the 'e') Stoney was appointed instructor of Musketry (25th foot) on 26th February 1870(London Gazette). Doesn't match the uniform, place or the age of the sitter. Irrelevant aside - I also came across a naval Lieuteneant Storey, who was court-martialled in 1880 for being responsible for a collision at sea which resulted in the loss of the British barque Nereid. "Lieut. Storey had lost his power of self-control, and gave orders which sent the Eclipse in different directions .... Lieut. Storey was severely reprimanded, and ordered to forfeit all seniority as lieutenant, and be dismissed from his ship."

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    John Spooner

    • 06/Jan/2014 12:41:59

    London Gazette 27th Nov 1883 - Kings's Own Borderers, Captain George Ormond Stoney, to be Major.

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    La Belle Province

    • 06/Jan/2014 12:52:24

    I wonder how much those hats weighed.

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    derangedlemur

    • 06/Jan/2014 13:01:11

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/la_belle_province] one and a half pounds, if I recall correctly (from reading it somewhere, not wearing one).

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    ofarrl

    • 06/Jan/2014 14:08:42

    His uniform is that of the Royal irish Fusiliers I believe. Only two regiments I know of wore two collar badges, the other one being the Seaforth Highlanders and he's definitely not one of those. He might be Ralph Durrant Sadleir Stoney or Leigh Sadleir Stoney mentioned here books.google.com/books?id=YSowAAAAYAAJ&lpg=PR20&o... I would lean towards this being Leigh Sadleir Stoney. It seems he had more of a connection to Ireland. He was made 2nd lieutenant in March 1898 and was later on High Sherriff of Queens County in 1911. www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/26948/pages/1717/page.pdf en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Sheriff_of_Queen's_County

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    derangedlemur

    • 06/Jan/2014 15:04:31

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Should he not have a grenade on his collar instead of an eagle if he's RIF?

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    ofarrl

    • 06/Jan/2014 15:06:37

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] It's a grenade with an eagle on it as far as I can see, you can make it out if you zoom in on the fullsize photo.

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    derangedlemur

    • 06/Jan/2014 15:12:50

    So it is. I didn't notice because the eagle is so much shinier than the grenade.

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    TEXASJOHN

    • 06/Jan/2014 15:34:41

    It must have gotten a bit tiring to wear a busby for any prolonged length of time!

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    silverfox2504

    • 06/Jan/2014 15:43:32

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] no beards though, except for officers in the Senior Service.

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    John Spooner

    • 06/Jan/2014 15:47:57

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/nicksbuscoach] I think the pioneers were allowed full beards as well.

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    John Spooner

    • 06/Jan/2014 15:53:36

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] A relative? The Pall Mall Gazette (London, England), Tuesday, June 7, 1892

    AN IRISH J.P. SENTENCED FOR ASSAULTING A LADY At the Court -house at Menagh yesterday there was disclosed a remarkable case in the house of Captain Bunbury, of Woodville, county Tipperary. Mr Sadleir Storey, a justice of the peace and Barrister at law, being charged with assault on Mrs. Bunbury. It was stated that while Mrs. Bunbury went out to visit a lady friend in the neighbourhood, who was about to leave for the Continent, Captain Bunbury, who was drinking, invited Mr Sadleir Storey, who resided in the vicinity, to join him, and that when she returned the two gentlemen were engaged carousing in a room to which she was refused admittance. The door was locked, and with a small hachet she attempted to break it open, whereupon Mr Sadleir Storey, rushing out, felled her with a blow, and seizing the hatchet beat her with it. He aimed a blow with the edge of the hatchet at her. The coachman came up, but Mr Sadleir Storey, hatchet in hand, chased both of them and afterwards, when Mrs. Bunbury, fearing for the safety of her children, ran to the nursery, she found the infuriated gentleman pursuing the nurse round a table, and proclaiming his intention to murder her if only he could lay his hands on her. Mrs. Bunbury and the servants were examined for the prosecution. Mr. Sadleir Storey defended himself, and contended that the assault was a slight one and much exaggerated. The magistrates sentenced him to three months' imprisonment with hard labour, and to give security for good behaviour. He gave notice of appeal.
    But what was Captain Bunbury doing while all this was going on? And why didn't he give evidence (one way or another)? My guess is that he'd drunk himself insensible and was incapable of intervening.

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    ofarrl

    • 06/Jan/2014 16:05:27

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner/] Very likely Leigh Sadleir Stoney himself, he was a J.P. for Queens County also and later on his wife divorced him on the grounds of cruelty I believe. Haven't found the details but the divorce is mentioned here hansard.millbanksystems.com/lords/1919/may/29/stoneys-div...

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 06/Jan/2014 16:05:50

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] A) Mad story, thank you John! B) They wrote of Sadleir StoRey (not Stoney) throughout that article?

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    ofarrl

    • 06/Jan/2014 16:15:37

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland]' I think it has to be a typo and perhaps a common one at the time maybe.

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    John Spooner

    • 06/Jan/2014 16:16:21

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] B) Yes with an R - my befuddled mind had got into the habit of thinking Storey and Stoney were interchangeable. The same story appeared in 6 other newspapers, all with 'R'. So possibly not related at all.

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    ofarrl

    • 06/Jan/2014 16:30:26

    I think its definitely a mispelling of his name in both the case of the photo and the account from the Pall Mall Gazette. In 1891 there was a Sadleir Stoney J.P. residing at Ballycapple, Cloughjordan, Tipperary, the same County as Captain Bunbury and close to his home at Woodville. books.google.com/books?id=xJsxAQAAIAAJ&pg=RA1-PA41&am...

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    John Spooner

    • 06/Jan/2014 16:30:31

    London Times June 25th 1919 in the account of the divorce proceedings.

    The parties were married on December 20, 1899. in the parish church of Seskinore, county Tyrone, according to the rites of the CHurch of Ireland, and they cohabited at Mullingar, in Dublin, and in other places in Ireland. There was the issue of the marriage one daughter, born on October 10, 1900. The petitioner alleged that her husband frequently, when under the influence of drink, swore at her and beat her, and that he had committed adultery with various women whose names were unknown. In June, 1918, the petitioner obtained a decree of divorce a mensa et thoro from the Matrimonial Court in Ireland on the ground of her husband's adultery and cruelty.
    He certainly sounds like the same person. EDIT: but he would have been only 14 at the time of the hatchet incident, and didn't become a JP until 1904.

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    ofarrl

    • 06/Jan/2014 17:06:24

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner/] Interesting, perhaps the gentleman in the Bunbury incident was his brother or cousin Ralph. I still am inclined to think the photo is that of Leigh Sadleir Stoney. Edited: It seems there were other members of the Sadlier Stoneys in Tipperary including a Sadleir Stoney, Esquire, M.A., Barrister at Law & J.P. with the family seat at Ballycapple, Tipperary. I think it was likely this Sadleir Stoney, an uncle of leigh Sadleir Stoney, that was involved in the Bunbury incident, he would have been about 70 at the time. books.google.com/books?id=uzc6AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA787&l...

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    ofarrl

    • 06/Jan/2014 17:58:10

    To get back to the uniform, the officer in the photo is a second lieutenant, the next rank up, lieutenant, would have had a single star on each shoulder in addition to the braided shoulder boards. The cuff braiding also indicates a lieutenant, this form of rank insignia was only in use from 1881 to 1902. Leigh Sadleir Stoney was made second lieutenant in March 1898.

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 07/Jan/2014 05:13:46

    So his coat would be red like that certain Prince that got married to Kate Middleton?

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    ofarrl

    • 07/Jan/2014 05:39:26

    Yes, the prince wore a very similar Irish Guards uniform. This is a nice example of an R.I.F. Officers uniform historical.ha.com/c/item.zx?saleNo=6050&lotIdNo=1006

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    bobgbennett

    • 13/Jan/2014 15:05:33

    Spot on ofarrl, I concur with all that you have said. A nice photo of a R.I.F. subaltern in full dress circa 1881-1902. They had been Princess Victoria's own regiment and so wore as one part of their two-piece collar badge a representation of her coronet. The other part was the fusiliers grenade with an Imperial French eagle mounted upon the ball, in commemoration of Sgt Masterson's (of the 87th Foot) capture of an eagle at the Battle of Barrossa. It is said that he was fighting drunk (perhaps apocryphal) and at the moment of capture shouted: "Bajasus bhoys, oi have the cuckoo". Whether true, or not, it makes a great story and paints an evocative picture! Sgt Masterson was rewarded with an ensigncy in the Royal Yorkshire Light Infantry Volunteers. Later the eagle was stolen and never recovered. The original staff is on display in the Royal Irish Fusiliers Museum in Armagh. The head dress in the photo is a bearskin, as worn by officers and warrant officers, rather than a busby.

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    @ltin zaçe

    • 15/Jan/2014 12:30:30

    Great photo

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    Metacolor

    • 01/Apr/2014 13:57:23

    www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/13560512033/ Great photo! I added some color to this portrait.

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    histoire_en_couleur

    • 11/Oct/2014 12:58:31

    www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/15317415768/in/photos... Great picture. Please look my work some different and more historic. The green scarf not appear in any document / archive footage. The gray hue, can be confused with green but it is indeed red. The uniform of a more intense red. That of a young lieutenant is almost new. It is not faded by time, fighting or campaigns.

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    bobgbennett

    • 07/Jul/2015 16:02:12

    The cuff under the braid should be dark blue, like the collar, but the rest of the colouration is accurate.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Jun/2016 08:04:42

    I have just added this photo to our 50,000+ Views Album. [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/sets/72157651136879037]

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